I'm a personal chef and have been cooking this way for years. Many of the recipes are those I've already lightened up myself, but a lot are new ideas. I love her recipes for sausage and other basics. She uses fewer store bought ingredients i believe than skinny girl, though ive only seen sg's tv appearances and not read all of her recipes. always better from scratch if you can do it. These recipes are simple and you'll find them delicious. I hope this inspires and teaches home cooks to adapt their own favorites. A few words of advice though with regard to things like canned tomatoes and low fat cheeses and breads etc. you may have to try a few to find ones you like that are decent. Don't toss a recipe before you do. With few ingredients the quality is super important and never, ever be tempted to use fat free cheese, it's gross! most important, pay close attention to portion. Even thougha recipe is low fat and low cal doesnt mean you can eat as much as you want!

Overnight oats for breakfast simply can't be beat. But don't overlook the dish as a healthy, fibre-packed sweet treat too. This vegan version celebrates pecans and peaches.

Get the recipe for Healthy Overnight Oats with Peaches


Sweet Treats & Swanky Stuff, Flaunt it Friday, Friday Fun Party, It’s a Hodgepodge Friday, Frugal Friday, Latest and Greatest Friday, Simply Link Party, Tickled Pink Fridays, Pity Party, Fantabulous Friday, Friday Flair,  Strut Your Stuff Saturday, Spotlight Saturday, Beautify it Monday, Tell Me Tuesdays, Spicy Link Up, Create and Share, Strut Your Stuff Link Party, Look What I Made!, Hookin’ Up with HoH, What I Whipped Up Wednesday, I Made This, Frugal Thursday, Catch a Glimpse Thursday, Thursdays are Your Days, Creative Thursdays, Transformation Thursday, A Crafty Soiree, Crazy Sweet Tuesdays, Handmade Projects,
First of all, what are guilt free snacks? That term can mean different things to different people. When we say “guilt free snacks” we’re referring to the guilt felt by those who eat sinfully delicious, yet calorie rich snacks in lieu of healthier options. Guilt free snacks take the guilt out of snacking by replacing things like saturated fat and sugar with more nutritious calorie sources, like protein and slow burning carbs that won’t spike your blood sugar.
It’s a while since I ate a burger, but there they were, nonchalant and fast on Oxford Street, so I slid into a booth and took a bite. And oh God it was fantastic. Rich and salty, a nostalgic ooze, the vivid memory of being eight years old and delighted, and yet, as I swooned into this moment of pleasure, I was conscious of having to trample a familiar guilt. As well as the guilt about eating meat, there was a whole lasagne of additional guilts, layered one on top of the other and softened with a rich white sauce.
Oh. Wow. Never would I have thought that a Diet Soda + Cake Mix = a decadent, yet low fat CAKE! Consider my mind blown. Just by nixing the eggs and oil, you deduct many calories from the cake. But who would have thought that adding a can of my favorite diet soda to it instead of the eggs and oil would make such a divine, diet-friendly dessert! Not me!!!!! Gotta be honest. I was truly skeptical. I decided I would give it a go but not have high expectations. And honestly, it was really delicious!
Think about the first time you tried a diet-y food or made your friend try something like frozen yogurt instead of ice cream. They probably reacted with a bit of disappointment compared to the real thing, but with enough praise of how ‘healthy’ this alternative is and some convincing marketing might be able to get just as excited about the diet version. That’s marketing.
As our understanding of the science behind diet and nutrition change, so too do the techniques behind dieting to lose weight. The Leaf weight loss blog is dedicated to keeping you informed about the most nutritious diet foods and dietary habits, working with top nutritionists to identify key ingredients to a balanced diet while still giving you the weight loss tools to indulge yourself in moderation.
Using the peanut paste, you can smear it on apples, bananas, or rice crackers. You can also replace the peanut butter in your favourite Thai noodle sauce with PB2, or use it in its powdered form in baked goods. If you go the baked goods route, make sure to swap out about ¼ of flour the recipe calls for since you’ll be adding extra powder with the PB2.
Fat-free Greek yogurt is a healthy alternative to sour cream or traditional full-fat yogurt. One 6-ounce serving has 100 calories, about half the calories of full-fat yogurt. This serving also has nearly 20 grams of protein and about 20 percent of your daily calcium requirement. Enjoy fat-free Greek yogurt as a dip for fresh cucumber slices, or blend it with fresh berries in a smoothie.
She further explained that having a positive attitude toward food is best for our emotional well-being. “In practice, this would mean feeling freedom to eat a range of food, including so-called ‘unhealthy’ options,” she said. “However, many people require support to be able to do this, particularly if they are using food for emotional regulation purposes ― they are using food for comfort or distraction the way others may use alcohol, shopping and sex. If the person identifies as having a true sugar addiction, striving for complete abstinence is wise.”
If you're from the South, you know all about chicken-fried steak: It's not chicken, it's steak—but it's deep-fried like fried chicken. Got it? Now make this brilliant version: Get some cube steak, cut it into fingers, and coat it in flour, saltine crackers and spices before giving it the deep-fry treatment. Make sure to dip the fingers in the mayo-mustard-sour cream mixture for extra decadence.

For those seeking something sweet without dunking into the decadence of chocolate, these energy balls are for you! What a fun and healthy way to enjoy the taste of homemade Snickerdoodle cookies! These delicious energy balls are loaded with oats, cashews, dates, vanilla and cinnamon to keep you enjoying the taste of homemade sweets, while treating your body right. What a classic, with a twist… well, technically a roll. Love the idea of energy balls? Check out our round-up of 4 Lip-Smacking Energy Balls for a Tastier Snack Time >
I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.

The research on the Health Halo - the idea that we make generalized assumptions about the health of a food based on a few trendy claims  - isn’t new. In the past, we’ve studied a similar phenomenon in people, being that we assume when we meet a person who is physically attractive, we also assume that the are also social, friendly, fun, competent etc. (a discussion for another day). But newer research is showing that we make these same generalizations from claims on food packaging. Foods labeled as ‘low calorie’ ‘fair trade’ ‘organic’ ‘natural’ we infer that they are superior in many ways to their shelf competitors. But not just superior - we assume it’s overall lower in calories. With fair-trade chocolate bars, there was an assumption that they ‘fair trade’ version was lower in calories - even though the way chocolate is farmed and traded doesn’t have much to do with it’s caloric content - we assume it does based on the claim!
The old egg-and-bacon combo is too predictable, and hot dogs can be tasty but...boring on their own. So here's a genius solution: Combine them all to make this inventively delicious, super-greasy meal, and dig in at breakfast or any time of day. These hot dogs don't just stop at fried eggs and bacon, by the way; they're also topped with hash browns, and cheese, and some tomato to keep the dietitians at bay.
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