But that’s our food reality these days. Food marketers freely use words like “guilt” and “sin” and “cheat” in the context of food, so what we eat is wrapped up in who we are and the choices we make. We judge food as being either good or bad, and then judge ourselves based on what we choose to eat. If we enjoy salad, we are good, but if we indulge in ice cream, we are bad . . . unless it’s guilt-free ice cream, of course. Doesn’t this sound absurd?
In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer analyzed 19 studies on indoor tanning and the risk for melanoma. It concluded that people who started indoor tanning before age 35 had a 75% greater risk of developing melanoma. Since 2003, UV radiation from any source has been listed by the U.S. National Toxicology Program as a known carcinogen (cancer-causing substance). Currently, many government agencies caution against tanning.
4. HEAT an 8" skillet on medium heat. Spray with cooking spray and pour about 1⁄4 cup of the batter into the skillet. Immediately tilt the skillet and swirl the batter around to coat the entire cooking surface. Cook until the bottom side is golden brown, 1 to 1½ minutes. Loosen with a spatula and flip, using the spatula and your fingers to help turn the crêpe. Cook until the opposite side is golden brown, reducing the heat to medium low if the crêpe browns too quickly, about 45 seconds. Transfer to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel.
This sandwich involves waffles, but it's more of a lunch than a breakfast thing. Want it for breakfast? No judgments. The idea is basically this: Take some greasy fried chicken and turn it into a sandwich by stuffing it between two slices of bacon-and-cheese-spiked waffles. Hard to get greasier than that. PS: This recipe calls for homemade waffles and home-fried chicken, but you can easily adapt it by using storebought frozen wafles and picking up some fried chicken from your favorite local source.

What is it about these foods that make us feel guilty? It’s different for everyone. Generally speaking, American society’s obsession with healthy eating can make it seem “better” to opt for a salad (nutritious, lower in calories, green) rather than a burger (oily, higher in calories, processed). In some cases, people have arbitrarily decided (perhaps after reading a misguided article or two) what foods are “good” or “bad” and feel guilty after eating a “bad’ food as a result of this categorization.
Don’t try to “work it off.” We’ve all been there: you eat a few too many cookies, then pledge to hit the gym extra hard the following day. Bad news: you can’t out-exercise a poor diet. In fact, exercising is the least efficient way that our bodies burn calories. So what should you do? Don’t worry about it. In order to gain one real pound, you would have to eat 3500 calories over your caloric limit. That’s over 5000 calories in a day! As long as you’re not going over your calorie budget on a regular basis, one day won’t derail your diet. So forget about cookies of the past and just keep sticking to your plan.

Zucchini adds moisture and a bit of sneaky nutrition in this classic quick bread, while chopped pecans add a crunchy twist. Make a double batch and stick a loaf in the freezer for when a craving strikes.

Get the recipe for Zucchini Bread with Pecans


Kelley Herring had to win over her health condition that went misdiagnosed for two full years. She learned that her sickness was a result of yeast infection,  sugars,  and preservatives in her diet and came to realize how a diet can break or build a person. Now, Kelly is the CEO, of Healing Gourmet website. She has written a number of resources on healthy eating and authored Healing Gourmet and Eat to Beat Diabetes that was published by McGraw-Hill back in 2005. Kelley has gathered ways to improve her health by simple changes in her lifestyle. She targeted mainly nutritional biochemistry, and learned how food compounds can help improve health and fight diseases. Kelley professionally leads a team of dieticians, doctors and chefs to create tools and resources on proper eating and nutrition.
2. MELT the butter in a medium saucepan on medium heat. Stir in the sugars and reduce the heat to low. Heat the mixture (avoid simmering), stirring often, until the sugar is partially dissolved, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in the cocoa, vanilla and 1⁄2 tsp salt. Beat the eggs lightly in a small bowl. Add to the cocoa mixture, stirring until just combined. Add the flour and stir until just combined. Stir in the chopped walnuts.
This year, a French grocery chain created a video for Ad Week showing how customers were tricked into thinking popsicles and yogurts were different flavors based on their coloring alone. They were actually all the same flavor but red ones were guessed to be cherry or strawberry and orange ones were guessed to be apricot or orange - coloring can trick our brain into assuming taste! Similarly, when we are told that one food product is superior to another or no longer ‘off limits’ since it’s labeled ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt-free’ it can change our sensory experience with the food, making it taste better. Our positive assumptions about how healthy or good a food is for us, can also make us find it more palatable and enjoyable but if we were to step back and objectively compare them - we might not be so convinced.
Food guilt is something a lot of people struggle with daily and it’s no wonder since the messages around us are constantly telling us to eat less red meat, that eggs are high in cholesterol, that all carbs are bad, that you must eat non-GMO and 100% organic, that saturated fat is bad and too much fruit is bad - it’s no wonder the population is confused and feeling guilty! Not only that, but many of us are trying to lose a few extra pounds, so even if healthy food is being consumed, there is still a lot of guilt experienced around the amount of calories one has probably eaten.

Light and healthy carrot cake topped with smooth cream cheese frosting and chopped walnuts.

Get the recipe for Two-Tiered Spiced Carrot Cake with Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting


What is it about these foods that make us feel guilty? It’s different for everyone. Generally speaking, American society’s obsession with healthy eating can make it seem “better” to opt for a salad (nutritious, lower in calories, green) rather than a burger (oily, higher in calories, processed). In some cases, people have arbitrarily decided (perhaps after reading a misguided article or two) what foods are “good” or “bad” and feel guilty after eating a “bad’ food as a result of this categorization.
17. Heavenly Blueberry and Cream Dessert: Heavenly is the absolute right word to describe this dessert. Use a store-bought angel food cake to save yourself some time and layer it with homemade whipped cream and fresh blueberries. Stick the completed trifle in the fridge and try to distract yourself for the next two hours while it chills. (via Mel’s Kitchen Cafe)
Those who “cheat” at the modern rules of eating, where the ultimate aim appears to be a white-eyed kind of superior weightlessness, are now so laughably old-fashioned that Americans (nearly 40% of whom are obese) are being invited to pay $38 to dress up as them, being photographed with pizza as a document of how far it’s possible to fall. Into a cereal bowl, into a pit, into a dark and terrifying place where you are a walking burger and no longer in control.
Sure, you could just eat cold pizza from the night before, but if you want to experience the true joy of pizza for breakfast, try this recipe. The pizza is topped with tater tots (you can choose fried or baked, but go with fried today, obviously)—plus two kinds of bacon. Oh, and there are eggs on top too. And cheese. Breakfast of champions? Yes indeed.  
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