I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
First of all, what are guilt free snacks? That term can mean different things to different people. When we say “guilt free snacks” we’re referring to the guilt felt by those who eat sinfully delicious, yet calorie rich snacks in lieu of healthier options. Guilt free snacks take the guilt out of snacking by replacing things like saturated fat and sugar with more nutritious calorie sources, like protein and slow burning carbs that won’t spike your blood sugar.
“There are an abundance of messages that tell overweight people it should be easy to lose or maintain a healthy weight,” she said. “For instance, ‘just eat less and move more.’ There are a lot of negative and shaming words and phrases around food: ‘I shouldn’t,’ ‘it’s naughty,’ ‘it’s a treat,’ ‘I’ve been good, so I’ll have one.’ We are wired to move away from pain, so the term ‘guilt-free’ likely provides a sense of relief that comes from reading a ‘guilt-free’ message before buying, and it helps marketers sell their products.”

This heavenly vegan double-layered apple cake is easy to make and combines fresh apples, cinnamon, all-spice, ginger, molasses and brown sugar with a fluffy and sweet maple buttercream frosting.

Get the recipe for Vegan Apple Spice Cake with Maple Buttercream


Rich and delicious, this vegan carrot cake is filled and topped with a thick layer of dairy-free cream cheese frosting for extra creaminess in every bite.

Get the recipe for Vegan Carrot Cake with "Cream Cheese" Frosting


Light and healthy carrot cake topped with smooth cream cheese frosting and chopped walnuts.

Get the recipe for Two-Tiered Spiced Carrot Cake with Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting


If you’ve never had the pleasure of eating fries covered in gravy and cheese curds, now's the time. This recipe shows you how to make the iconic Canadian snack food—and gives an easy substitution for cheese curds if you don't have any on hand (just tear up some mozzarella). Once you've mastered this traditional version of poutine, you can start piling on additional greasy toppings, like bacon (naturally). We've even seen poutine piled with fried eggs, short ribs, chopped corn dogs, and all kinds of greasy delights. 

Chocolate - As long as you are focusing on eating dark chocolate with little sugar, then chocolate has a lot of minerals to offer such as iron, magnesium, copper and manganese as well as flavanol, which has been shown to aid in cardiovascular health.  If you have a sweet tooth, try to squash it with dark chocolate dipped in natural peanut butter, and enjoy it guilt free!


Blueberries are low in calories, high in fiber and rich in antioxidants. They have about 60 calories and nearly 3 grams of fiber in 3/4 cup. Powerful antioxidant flavonoids called anthocyanins are particularly high in blueberries. Anthocyanins neutralize damaging free radicals that boost your risk of chronic diseases by increasing oxidative stress on cells. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health published a study on anthocyanins and published their work in a 2012 publication of "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." They found that consuming at least two servings of anthocyanin-rich blueberries each week lessens oxidative stress in your system and minimizes your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Never heard of PB2 before? You’re in for a treat! It’s peanut butter in powdered form, made by pressing peanuts to remove their natural oils and fat content. In the end, you get a powdered peanut butter that has about 85% to 90% fewer calories than traditional peanut butter! PB2 has become a go-to for the health conscious since it’s so easy to throw into meals, baked goods and post-workout smoothies. You still get the delicious flavour of peanut butter without all the calories!
Did you say guacamole?! Being one of the latest crazes, guacamole is something people are willing to bathe in and always willing to pay the extra dollar. This is not just any ordinary guacamole, though; this is guacamole combined with bacon and cheese. Extremely low in sugar, this cheesy guacamole is perfect for dipping carrots or celery into. If you find yourself unable to stop once you’ve started, try making a smaller portion using just one avocado.
For all you dip lovers out there, here’s your next favorite snack perfect for dipping fruit and veggies in! Swap the chocolate chips out for a more natural form, cacao nibs, and use plain greek yogurt instead for an added source of protein, a lower carb intake, and less sugar. Get your dippers ready because this treat is something you won’t stop coming back to!

To make this quick and healthy dessert, simply whip up some unsweetened coconut cream in a food processor to form a whipped cream consistency and serve with some fresh berries. That’s it! You now have a delicious guilt-free dessert that doesn’t add unnecessary amounts of sugar plus this recipe is dairy free and packs in a nice dose of fiber and antioxidants from the berries.
Research has found that the antioxidant capacity of cacao in comparison to green tea, black tea, and red wine has the greatest activity and most potential for health benefits. If you don’t know, antioxidants are those fabulous things that slow down those unwanted changes that come with aging, reduce the risk of cancer and help decrease the chances of heart disease. At only 108 calories a pop, feel free to have two or three of these eye-pleasing little bliss balls.

Thanks Hilda! Good to know that 6.2 is the total carb count. My mother and I made these and they turned out delicious! We will make again. The batch ended up making 27 cookies though versus 16. We followed both wet and dry ingredients so not sure why the extra. The cookies ended up being about 1.5- 2 inches in diameter.I also found this recipe on my Senza app so tracking will be easy. 😁
In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer analyzed 19 studies on indoor tanning and the risk for melanoma. It concluded that people who started indoor tanning before age 35 had a 75% greater risk of developing melanoma. Since 2003, UV radiation from any source has been listed by the U.S. National Toxicology Program as a known carcinogen (cancer-causing substance). Currently, many government agencies caution against tanning.
I’ve also worked for startups - food, beverage and grocery store - so have been involved in the crafting of actual products and their messaging as well as seeing how customers react to them. When I worked in a boutique grocery in downtown NYC some customers wouldn’t buy products UNLESS they had calorie labels on them - even if they were made fresh from a restaurant next door. Others, would pick up $70+ worth of trendy supplements, weekly, and admit to not knowing what they were but that they recognized the name from Goop. Then there are the health-ified foods - that have added ‘protein’ or ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt free’ written into the brand name to let us know they’re okay to have! Thanks, marketing! 

I know exactly where you are because I’ve been there myself…I remember being so tired that I could barely function. I gained 30 pounds out of nowhere and had a severe case of brain fog. I also started to get severe anxiety and panic attacks. I was driven and motivated…until I wasn’t. I didn’t know what was happening to me. All I wanted was to get my life back…
Excellent recipe, came out amazing, delicious and just as the picture. Taste was rich and cake moist. Was a bit too sweet, will reduce the amount of sugar next time. No need to add sugar to the egg whites. If you want your cake to have height, you need to be extremelly careful while folding in the whipped egg whites. Overall I really recommend if you are a chocolate lover like me!
Well, buckle up, because these healthy desserts are about to take you on an unexpected, yet truly exciting ride. This means we’re not talking about chocolate covered strawberries—as tasty as they are. From potassium-packed chocolate banana bread muffins to “clean” cookie dough (that’s totally safe to eat raw), these amazing healthy desserts prove that healthy eating doesn’t have to mean salads without dressing. What’s more, making healthy choices can mean actually looking forward to what you eat.
If you're from the South, you know all about chicken-fried steak: It's not chicken, it's steak—but it's deep-fried like fried chicken. Got it? Now make this brilliant version: Get some cube steak, cut it into fingers, and coat it in flour, saltine crackers and spices before giving it the deep-fry treatment. Make sure to dip the fingers in the mayo-mustard-sour cream mixture for extra decadence.
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