What else? There is never ‘guilt’ as an ingredient. I promise. Go check the back of your favorite “guilty” food, it won’t be listed. When we label foods as ‘guilt free’ it makes it seem like we should feel guilt about foods that aren’t labeled guilt free. Yikes. What’s really happening is that the labeling of this product is using basic psychology and marketing principles to make you buy their product - but it’s also changing how you feelings and thoughts about food.
4. HEAT an 8" skillet on medium heat. Spray with cooking spray and pour about 1⁄4 cup of the batter into the skillet. Immediately tilt the skillet and swirl the batter around to coat the entire cooking surface. Cook until the bottom side is golden brown, 1 to 1½ minutes. Loosen with a spatula and flip, using the spatula and your fingers to help turn the crêpe. Cook until the opposite side is golden brown, reducing the heat to medium low if the crêpe browns too quickly, about 45 seconds. Transfer to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel.
You can also substitute it in your favourite smoothie recipes. Add PB2 in powder form instead of high calorie peanut butter. And it will make a great addition to your favourite keto pancakes! You can also use it to make your favourite frozen treats or protein bars by simply substituting PB2! Don’t forget a classic PB&J sandwich, using the PB2 powder mixed with water to form a yummy paste!

If you’re looking for a way to sustain your health and weight loss goals, the keto diet may be just the thing for you. It’s a high fat, low carb eating plan that forces your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When your body is in ketosis, it uses fat as its primary food source, rather than carbohydrates. Your body typically burns carbs for energy, but the goal of the keto diet is to rid your body of as many carbs as you can so that your body has to look elsewhere for fuel. It ends up burning new and stored fat for weight loss that actually lasts!


I’m Julie. This is where my love of cupcakes, digital photography as well as writing comes to life! How did this recipe thing all begin? In November of 2012, I made the decision that I needed to keep a log of my recipes, so I started a simple recipe blog. This beautiful collection of cupcakes and cafe delights continues to grow every week and I can’t wait to see where it is 5 years down the road. My grandma encouraged all of my baking. At family gatherings with well over 250 individuals the midst of absolutely no where, she consistently was able to create perfect cherry cobblers along with other goodies for dessert over the campfire. It seemed to be like magic for me.


Don’t get angry. If you become angry at yourself after eating more than planned, think about why. You know one or two “out-of-the-ordinary” meals won’t reverse all of your progress. If you let minor setbacks get to you, you could be getting into a dangerous mindset. If you try to restrict and lower your calories below what Noom has set for you, you are likely to binge later on. This binge-restrict pattern is very difficult to get out of once it’s become habit. The best thing you can do for yourself after overeating is to continue as planned. Don’t try to account for the extra food, and don’t be angry at yourself. Everyone slips up in dieting, even those who have done it countless times. Forgive yourself and move on.
The Standard Ketogenic Diet Plan is the plan that you will learn the most about. When the “Keto Diet” is referenced, this is the plan being referenced. This diet plan consists of a 75% fat intake, 20% protein intake, and 5% carbohydrate intake. As with all diets, you should keep in mind that fat intake is different for everyone, so you can tweak it to your optimal consumption point.
I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
It’s a while since I ate a burger, but there they were, nonchalant and fast on Oxford Street, so I slid into a booth and took a bite. And oh God it was fantastic. Rich and salty, a nostalgic ooze, the vivid memory of being eight years old and delighted, and yet, as I swooned into this moment of pleasure, I was conscious of having to trample a familiar guilt. As well as the guilt about eating meat, there was a whole lasagne of additional guilts, layered one on top of the other and softened with a rich white sauce.

Ketogenic diets also help lower insulin levels, which can prevent type 2 diabetes, or reduce the symptoms of those with T2 Diabetes. The pancreas makes insulin to regulate glucose levels and move glucose through the bloodstream.  Since the ketogenic diets limits carbohydrate intake, your body will have less glucose and therefore produce less insulin.
Research has found that the antioxidant capacity of cacao in comparison to green tea, black tea, and red wine has the greatest activity and most potential for health benefits. If you don’t know, antioxidants are those fabulous things that slow down those unwanted changes that come with aging, reduce the risk of cancer and help decrease the chances of heart disease. At only 108 calories a pop, feel free to have two or three of these eye-pleasing little bliss balls.

This basic (and delicious) vegan cookie recipe can be used in a variety of tasty ways. Try peanut butter and peanuts in place of chocolate chips, or adding mini vegan marshmallows on top and broiling for a torched effect.

Get the recipe for Vegan Chocolate Cookies


Crêpes are easy to make—once you get the hang of it. Some tips: Tilt the skillet immediately after pouring in the batter so it thinly coats the entire cooking surface, and make sure the pan is hot enough so that the crêpe cooks quickly and doesn’t stick (it should sizzle a little on contact). Also take the crêpe out of the pan as soon as both sides are light golden brown so it’s tender, not crispy.

Turn off the oven and head to your nearest farmers’ market to grab a basket of naturally sweet and tangy raspberries. This raw and vegan dessert will please any diner, regardless of dietary restriction.

Get the recipe for No-Bake Raspberry Crumble Bowls


Crêpes are easy to make—once you get the hang of it. Some tips: Tilt the skillet immediately after pouring in the batter so it thinly coats the entire cooking surface, and make sure the pan is hot enough so that the crêpe cooks quickly and doesn’t stick (it should sizzle a little on contact). Also take the crêpe out of the pan as soon as both sides are light golden brown so it’s tender, not crispy.
UV radiation is one part of the spectrum of light that reaches the earth from the sun. At the UV end of the spectrum, the wavelengths are too short to be visible to the naked eye. They range in length from 100 to 400 nanometers (nm, or billionths of a meter) and are classified — from the longest to the shortest — as UVA (320 to 400 nm), UVB (290 to 315 nm), and UVC (100 to 280 nm). UVA rays, which penetrate deep into the skin, are responsible for tanning. UVB rays damage superficial skin cell layers, causing sunburn. UVC rays, the shortest, are considered harmless, since most UVC light is absorbed by ozone in the upper atmosphere and thus does not reach the earth. Of the UV solar radiation that does reach the earth, up to 95% is UVA, and about 5% is UVB. For years, scientists believed UVB rays were the most harmful, because sunburn is linked to melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. But since the late 1980s, we've learned that UVA rays also increase skin cancer risk — and they are the main cause of photoaging.

Inspired by the old-school, ultra-rich, mousselike chocolate cake that usually called for a whole pound of chocolate, half a dozen eggs and lots of butter, this enlightened rendition has deep bittersweet chocolate flavor and dense melt-in-your-mouth texture. No one will guess it's healthier. The secret is excellent natural cocoa powder and good-quality bittersweet chocolate, preferably with 70% cacao. Although the cake can be eaten once it's completely cool, it comes out of the pan much easier and even tastes better if it has been chilled at least overnight.


Butter, cheese, full fat milk, yogurt, sour cream, cream, beef, pork and nuts - The common thread here is that many still are confused about fat since it was wrongfully demonized in the 1970s. The fats that are found in these foods are long chain fatty acids (LCFA) and form the core structural fats in the body comprising 75 - 80% of fatty acids in most cells. LCFA, along with monounsaturated fats (MFA) are the body’s preferred fuel source. Well conducted and replicated research has shown that these fats reduce the risk of heart disease by increasing HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol. These fats also help to increase muscle mass and stabilize energy and mood.

When you tell someone that you made a ‘guilt-free’ dessert without flour (or another normal baking ingredient), they’ll probably say something along the lines of “okay so I can have twice as many now, right?!” That is exactly the messaging of Halo Top ice cream. Their packages tell you to “stop eating when you hit the bottom” since they are a ‘guilt-free’ dessert. It enforces the idea that we eat based on how guilty a food makes us or not - instead of things like taste, satisfaction, hunger, nutrition, what you’re in the mood for, all the WHYs and reasons we should be eating and enjoying foods!
Sure, you could just eat cold pizza from the night before, but if you want to experience the true joy of pizza for breakfast, try this recipe. The pizza is topped with tater tots (you can choose fried or baked, but go with fried today, obviously)—plus two kinds of bacon. Oh, and there are eggs on top too. And cheese. Breakfast of champions? Yes indeed.  
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