In a blog post for the International Food Information Council Foundation, Pike wrote how clean eating transformed from people wanting to eat more wholesome foods to it becoming “a privilege of consuming nicely packaged foods with influencer-approved ingredients,” and how this type of eating excludes those who don’t have access to upscale grocery stores. “[Clean eating] implies that those who don’t care to eat clean are unhealthy or lazy — they are eating ‘dirty,’” she wrote in the post.
Crêpes are easy to make—once you get the hang of it. Some tips: Tilt the skillet immediately after pouring in the batter so it thinly coats the entire cooking surface, and make sure the pan is hot enough so that the crêpe cooks quickly and doesn’t stick (it should sizzle a little on contact). Also take the crêpe out of the pan as soon as both sides are light golden brown so it’s tender, not crispy.
3. TO MAKE THE TOPPING: In a food processor, combine the almonds, flour, brown sugar, sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Mix until finely ground. Add the vanilla and butter. Pulse until the butter is cut into small crumbs. Pour half of the peaches into the prepared pan. Add half of the raspberries. Top with the remaining peaches and then the remaining raspberries. Sprinkle with the topping and press gently.
Further proof that we are living in some bizarro capitalist dystopia came with reports from the United States on the ‘trend’ of co-workers donating portions of their paltry holiday allowance to new parents who have used up their paid family leave. Rather than a horrifying exposé of structural manipulation, it was framed as a cheery feelgood story of everyday heroism. Something is terribly, terribly wrong.
2. MELT the butter in a medium saucepan on medium heat. Stir in the sugars and reduce the heat to low. Heat the mixture (avoid simmering), stirring often, until the sugar is partially dissolved, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in the cocoa, vanilla and 1⁄2 tsp salt. Beat the eggs lightly in a small bowl. Add to the cocoa mixture, stirring until just combined. Add the flour and stir until just combined. Stir in the chopped walnuts.
I’ve also worked for startups - food, beverage and grocery store - so have been involved in the crafting of actual products and their messaging as well as seeing how customers react to them. When I worked in a boutique grocery in downtown NYC some customers wouldn’t buy products UNLESS they had calorie labels on them - even if they were made fresh from a restaurant next door. Others, would pick up $70+ worth of trendy supplements, weekly, and admit to not knowing what they were but that they recognized the name from Goop. Then there are the health-ified foods - that have added ‘protein’ or ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt free’ written into the brand name to let us know they’re okay to have! Thanks, marketing!
This year, a French grocery chain created a video for Ad Week showing how customers were tricked into thinking popsicles and yogurts were different flavors based on their coloring alone. They were actually all the same flavor but red ones were guessed to be cherry or strawberry and orange ones were guessed to be apricot or orange - coloring can trick our brain into assuming taste! Similarly, when we are told that one food product is superior to another or no longer ‘off limits’ since it’s labeled ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt-free’ it can change our sensory experience with the food, making it taste better. Our positive assumptions about how healthy or good a food is for us, can also make us find it more palatable and enjoyable but if we were to step back and objectively compare them - we might not be so convinced.
Andrea Soranidis is the author of popular food blog ThePetiteCook.com. She loves to share healthy and gourmet recipes inspired by her foodie adventures, and her aim is to help other foodies cook delicious easy recipes with natural ingredients. Follow The Petite Cook on Facebook (www.facebook.com/lovethepetitecook) for your daily source of cooking inspiration from all around the world.
This shake is vegan and gluten free without any added sugars. Using a tablespoon or two less peanut butter and add another tablespoon cacao to cut back the calories and fat content. This simple shake packs a fantastic flavor and is a perfect portion for a midafternoon snack or post-dinner dessert. It’s so tasty that you’ll have to be careful not to sip too fast and risk brain freeze!
Think about the first time you tried a diet-y food or made your friend try something like frozen yogurt instead of ice cream. They probably reacted with a bit of disappointment compared to the real thing, but with enough praise of how ‘healthy’ this alternative is and some convincing marketing might be able to get just as excited about the diet version. That’s marketing.
The Most Decadent Diet Ever! is actually NOT a diet book! It tells the story of how I’ve lost over 70 pounds and kept it off WITHOUT dieting! Then it offers over 125 incredibly decadent recipes – the stuff we all crave (like Buffalo Wings and Chocolate Layer Cake). It’s the perfect book if you think that healthy food can’t be insanely delicious AND/OR if you love to bake (though there are plenty of “real food” recipes too). The recipes are simple, but many do take a bit of time.
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