To avoid these messages is a part-time job with little security and no holiday, yet vital, if you want to enjoy food and still not detest your belly. And even when you’re sane, even when you know that thinness is not godliness and sugar is not evil, there is still the pressing awareness, like a small sharp stone in your shoe, that eating a burger is… wrong.
4. HEAT an 8" skillet on medium heat. Spray with cooking spray and pour about 1⁄4 cup of the batter into the skillet. Immediately tilt the skillet and swirl the batter around to coat the entire cooking surface. Cook until the bottom side is golden brown, 1 to 1½ minutes. Loosen with a spatula and flip, using the spatula and your fingers to help turn the crêpe. Cook until the opposite side is golden brown, reducing the heat to medium low if the crêpe browns too quickly, about 45 seconds. Transfer to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel.
It's nearly the end of November, the traditional kick-off to holiday temptations. And it's a long season — Thanksgiving, family get togethers, office parties, New Year's Eve celebrations, right through to Superbowl Sunday. Many people find healthy eating difficult this time of year. Maybe you've settled into an exercise routine and eaten wisely for months and are worried about undoing all the good you've done. Or maybe you want to simply avoid adding pounds.
We all have cravings and impulses and urges. Heck, half the time time I don’t want to get up in the morning and go to work, or help my kids with homework, or wash dishes. These are impulses, but ultimately, I know the work needs to get done. Well, why is that different than eating? Why is it OK to succumb to our urges that push us further away from our goals, because its food? What if it was drugs? You get my point…..

These simple-to-prepare recipes for the kind of delectable dishes people crave but feel they can’t eat when trying to be healthy and trim, actually can be the basis of a personal weight-loss plan. They can also be a way to add “off-limit” foods back into an already successful diet. Or they can simply be part of an exciting new way to eat healthfully — and with pleasure.
Changing habits is an emotional processes by nature. They can be borne out of unhappiness, an intrinsic motivation such as being able to keep up with one’s kids, or simply a desire to lead a healthier lifestyle. Whatever the reason, lifestyle changes are often deeply personal. While some people love engaging in health and fitness communities, others would rather keep their information in a private app and never say a word about their goals. But no matter how you slice it, almost anyone who is trying to make a change in their diet has experienced food-related guilt. One study found that 80% of women and 70% of men suffer from food guilt. So what is food guilt and why does it happen to so many people?

These simple-to-prepare recipes for the kind of delectable dishes people crave but feel they can’t eat when trying to be healthy and trim, actually can be the basis of a personal weight-loss plan. They can also be a way to add “off-limit” foods back into an already successful diet. Or they can simply be part of an exciting new way to eat healthfully — and with pleasure.
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