Lori and Michelle Corso‘s Raw Mini Chocolate Cream Cakes are not only healthy and easy to make, they are raw and gluten free too! Plus perfect individual serving! Plus this recipe can be easily changed to your taste preference. We used pecans in the crust, but any nut would work.  For the filling, we used cashews as they provide the best cream. But macadamia nuts would be okay.  We reduced the amount of sugar in these chocolate cream cakes, so adjust to your liking.
Hey, guys! I don't know about you, but we often find ourselves craving something sweet, especially after dinner. It's a thing. We shared our favorite sweets a couple weeks ago, and now we are going to switch gears and give you some healthier options. A lot of them involve chocolate and they are still pretty guilt-free. We'll take it! First off is this non-dairy chocolate pudding made with avocado (it's amazing).
Inspired by the old-school, ultra-rich, mousselike chocolate cake that usually called for a whole pound of chocolate, half a dozen eggs and lots of butter, this enlightened rendition has deep bittersweet chocolate flavor and dense melt-in-your-mouth texture. No one will guess it's healthier. The secret is excellent natural cocoa powder and good-quality bittersweet chocolate, preferably with 70% cacao. Although the cake can be eaten once it's completely cool, it comes out of the pan much easier and even tastes better if it has been chilled at least overnight.
It’s not so long ago that to be thought of as a “picky eater” was something to be avoided at all costs. “More tripe please!” you’d gag, spooning remnants of emulsified cabbage into your mouth to get rid of the taste of undiluted Vimto, secure in the knowledge there would be pink Angel Delight as soon as you’d cleaned your plate. Until: suddenly not. Suddenly the concept blossomed, its roots cracking the tarmac and altering the landscape, causing pile-ups. And here we are in a time when to be a picky eater is simply to be “educated”, adult, conscious, in pursuit of physical health at both emotional and social cost, and also, importantly, better than you.
The Guilt Free Desserts review provides knowledge of a famous product of Kelley Herring – The Guilt Free Desserts recipes cookbook. It is based on the real experience of Lucy – a woman who tried this cookbook and felt very satisfied with what the book brings about. According to Lucy, author Kelley is the Founder & CEO of Healing Gourmet – the world’s leading provider of organic, sustainable meal plans and recipes for health and fitness. She is also the Chief Editor of a 4-book series published by McGraw-Hill including: Eat to Boost Fertility, Eat to Lower Cholesterol, Eat to Beat Diabetes, and Eat to Fight Cancer.

While these little treats are not actually Paleo if you decide to use peanut butter, they are still little bites of heaven. If you choose to stick with almond butter, they can still be eaten on a Paleo diet, and they are just as delicious! The Reese’s we are all familiar with is filled with refined sugars and a bunch of other ingredients no one knows how to pronounce. Here is a healthy option to swap for your favorite candy. The recipe is quick and the outcome is oh-so-tasty.

Guilt doesn’t work as a motivator for healthy eating — so why bother? It just makes us feel bad. Remind yourself that you do not need to succumb to the marketing ploy of “guilt-free food.” Eating is pleasure and is part of everyday life. And if you forget that, repeat these words: “I don’t have to feel guilty, because I haven’t done anything wrong.”

Food guilt is something a lot of people struggle with daily and it’s no wonder since the messages around us are constantly telling us to eat less red meat, that eggs are high in cholesterol, that all carbs are bad, that you must eat non-GMO and 100% organic, that saturated fat is bad and too much fruit is bad - it’s no wonder the population is confused and feeling guilty! Not only that, but many of us are trying to lose a few extra pounds, so even if healthy food is being consumed, there is still a lot of guilt experienced around the amount of calories one has probably eaten.


Don't feel guilty if you need your daily chocolate fix. Dark chocolate that is 70 to 85 percent cacao offers around 90 calories per half-ounce serving. In 2011, Boston-based researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted a review of the benefits of dark chocolate. Published in the "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition," the study reported that consuming dark chocolate on a daily basis for two to 12 weeks improves blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol. This is the harmful cholesterol that hardens arteries and increases your risk of heart disease. Although dark chocolate can be beneficial for your heart, keep your serving size to a half-ounce to avoid consuming a high amount of calories.

These vegan muffins prove you can whip up a delicious baked good when low on pantry staples. Switch up the pears and pecans in this recipe for whichever fruits and nuts you have on hand.

Get the recipe for Vegan Pear, Cranberry and Pecan Muffins


These crunchy cookie bars are packed with dried cranberries and creamy chunks of sweet white chocolate. Coat them in a citrusy orange yogurt glaze and sprinkle with chopped cranberries for added texture and sweetness.

Get the recipe for White Chocolate Cranberry Cookie Bars


These simple-to-prepare recipes for the kind of delectable dishes people crave but feel they can’t eat when trying to be healthy and trim, actually can be the basis of a personal weight-loss plan. They can also be a way to add “off-limit” foods back into an already successful diet. Or they can simply be part of an exciting new way to eat healthfully — and with pleasure.
×