The beauty of vegan baking and raw cake-making is that you can totally reinvent classic dishes. That way, you get to enjoy two versions: the more traditional, familiar recipe, and the new, tantalizing recipe. The brownie base of Clémence Moulart‘s Raw Walnut Coffee Cake is a cheeky wink to all the chocolate lovers out there: it makes this cake even more indulgent!

These rich chocolate almond doughnuts are vegan and easy to make. You won't have to fumble with a special doughnut pan either since the dough rolls and cuts with ease.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson's Vegan Baked Chocolate Almond Doughnuts


I’ve also worked for startups - food, beverage and grocery store - so have been involved in the crafting of actual products and their messaging as well as seeing how customers react to them. When I worked in a boutique grocery in downtown NYC some customers wouldn’t buy products UNLESS they had calorie labels on them - even if they were made fresh from a restaurant next door. Others, would pick up $70+ worth of trendy supplements, weekly, and admit to not knowing what they were but that they recognized the name from Goop. Then there are the health-ified foods - that have added ‘protein’ or ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt free’ written into the brand name to let us know they’re okay to have! Thanks, marketing!
Hi, not to rain on someone else’s blog, but I have made these twice and was blown away- search’ bakery style keto chocolate chip cookies’. It is unbelievable that they are keto. Sorry, Kim, but these are really, REALLY good. give them a try, too! BTW, thank you so much for posting this dessert list. I especially like the dairy free pudding one, Ill be trying that as soon as I can get the ingredients.
Changing habits is an emotional processes by nature. They can be borne out of unhappiness, an intrinsic motivation such as being able to keep up with one’s kids, or simply a desire to lead a healthier lifestyle. Whatever the reason, lifestyle changes are often deeply personal. While some people love engaging in health and fitness communities, others would rather keep their information in a private app and never say a word about their goals. But no matter how you slice it, almost anyone who is trying to make a change in their diet has experienced food-related guilt. One study found that 80% of women and 70% of men suffer from food guilt. So what is food guilt and why does it happen to so many people?
In the past few years, the term “guilt-free comfort food” has been circulating on the internet and becoming prevalent in the marketing of food. Halo Top and the ilk advertise a guilt-free experience and Fitness magazine, The Daily Meal and Food Network have published roundup articles on guilt-free recipes. Many of these recipes substitute baked for fried, or they feature swaps like mac and cheese made with reduced-fat cheese or “ice cream” made with yogurt and vegan protein powder.
Whether you want to kick your afternoon sweet habit or simply need a snack to tide you over until your next meal, you have several healthy options available. Guilt-free foods are low in calories, provide nutrients to keep you healthy and offer fiber to improve satiety. Foods ranging from carrots to dark chocolate provide the nutrition your body needs, without excessive fat and calories to make you feel guilty.
Not only does it change your buying behavior but it also changes your EATING behavior. You’re more likely to have a greater amount of an item you label as ‘guilt-free’ than one you see as neutral. Research by Brian Wansink  - a known leader in studying consumer behavior and marketing research -  has shown that labeling a food as ‘low fat’ increased the consumption of that food by as much as 50%. Regardless of the amount more we may have - the idea is that when we see a food as ‘guilt-free’ we consume more of it than we would it’s ‘guilty’ competitor.  
The goal is not to demonize any kind of food. There is nothing wrong with a cookie or a piece of pizza. However, it is important to be mindful of how much and how often we eat certain foods. Seek balance and practice moderation. Remember that food is necessary for both nourishment and enjoyment. Work on not only having a healthy body, but also on having a healthy relationship with yourself and with food.

Don’t be competitive. Have you ever gone out to eat in a group and had someone announce that they were going to “be good” and get a salad? You had been working hard that week and you were ready (and excited!) to reward yourself with a treat meal. This little announcement might cause you to rethink your choice. Don’t let it! Other people’s diets and food choices have no impact on your personal diet. People who announce their food choices are probably just looking to be rewarded with kind comments by others. Don’t let their insecurity get you down.
3. ROLL OUT the dough into an 11" round on a lightly floured surface. Transfer the dough to a 9" tart pan with a removable bottom. Firmly press the dough against the bottom and sides of the pan. Trim the edges. Prick the bottom of the dough all over with a fork. Line with foil or parchment paper and weight down with pie weights or dried beans. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove the foil and weights. Bake for 5 minutes longer, or until lightly browned. Cool completely on a rack.
Thanks Hilda! Good to know that 6.2 is the total carb count. My mother and I made these and they turned out delicious! We will make again. The batch ended up making 27 cookies though versus 16. We followed both wet and dry ingredients so not sure why the extra. The cookies ended up being about 1.5- 2 inches in diameter.I also found this recipe on my Senza app so tracking will be easy. 😁
2. MELT the butter in a medium saucepan on medium heat. Stir in the sugars and reduce the heat to low. Heat the mixture (avoid simmering), stirring often, until the sugar is partially dissolved, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in the cocoa, vanilla and 1⁄2 tsp salt. Beat the eggs lightly in a small bowl. Add to the cocoa mixture, stirring until just combined. Add the flour and stir until just combined. Stir in the chopped walnuts.

Layers of banana, raspberry and blueberry yogurt (essentially plain yogurt, sugar and fruit blended together) are poured into popsicle molds before getting tossed in the freezer. A super simple treat the whole family will enjoy!

Get the recipe for Tri-Coloured Frozen Yogurt Popsicles


For all you dip lovers out there, here’s your next favorite snack perfect for dipping fruit and veggies in! Swap the chocolate chips out for a more natural form, cacao nibs, and use plain greek yogurt instead for an added source of protein, a lower carb intake, and less sugar. Get your dippers ready because this treat is something you won’t stop coming back to!
Kelley Herring had to win over her health condition that went misdiagnosed for two full years. She learned that her sickness was a result of yeast infection,  sugars,  and preservatives in her diet and came to realize how a diet can break or build a person. Now, Kelly is the CEO, of Healing Gourmet website. She has written a number of resources on healthy eating and authored Healing Gourmet and Eat to Beat Diabetes that was published by McGraw-Hill back in 2005. Kelley has gathered ways to improve her health by simple changes in her lifestyle. She targeted mainly nutritional biochemistry, and learned how food compounds can help improve health and fight diseases. Kelley professionally leads a team of dieticians, doctors and chefs to create tools and resources on proper eating and nutrition.

Raw desserts often feature a short list of whole, unprocessed ingredients like nuts, seeds, and dried fruit. They get their sweetness from dried fruit, raw agave nectar, and other natural sweeteners. No refined or artificial sweeteners here! They are no-bake! Great for the warmth of spring or summer, and also for energy conservation, you can avoid cranking up the oven to 350 when making a raw dessert. Most raw desserts are gluten-free and vegan!
Oh. Wow. Never would I have thought that a Diet Soda + Cake Mix = a decadent, yet low fat CAKE! Consider my mind blown. Just by nixing the eggs and oil, you deduct many calories from the cake. But who would have thought that adding a can of my favorite diet soda to it instead of the eggs and oil would make such a divine, diet-friendly dessert! Not me!!!!! Gotta be honest. I was truly skeptical. I decided I would give it a go but not have high expectations. And honestly, it was really delicious!

Believe it or not, your body is really, really good at guiding you to eat enough, choose nourishing foods and support your health. Yes, nutrition knowledge and understanding is helpful to guide that intuition, but it’s definitely there. So if you’re eating and choosing foods because of some flashy labeling or creative marketing - it’s hard to tell if you actually LIKE what you’re eating and if it even feels good to you. If you’re eating ‘til the bottom of Halo Top because it’s a ‘permitted food’, you likely aren’t paying attention to your increasing fullness, how satisfying it is, or if you’re even liking it! If we’re constantly ignoring those signals and eating until uncomfortable - albeit, ‘guilt-free’ - fullness, it makes it much harder for us to tune in and eat a satisfying amount of the real stuff and increases our dependence on filling up on the ‘guilt-free’ ones!

Silken tofu is incredibly soft and creamy, often used in dairy-free desserts, just like in this tasty recipe with cocoa and maple syrup. It's healthier than your typical pudding so you can enjoy it for breakfast, too!

Get this recipe for Cocoa Silken Pudding


If you want to beat food guilt, think about why you have it in the first place. What triggers your guilt? It might be specific foods or it might be an internal feeling. Now think about why. Do you feel bloated after you eat it? Did someone once tell you that X food was healthier than Y food and now you feel bad after eating Y food? Once you find the root of your guilt, you can start to alleviate it.
Never heard of PB2 before? You’re in for a treat! It’s peanut butter in powdered form, made by pressing peanuts to remove their natural oils and fat content. In the end, you get a powdered peanut butter that has about 85% to 90% fewer calories than traditional peanut butter! PB2 has become a go-to for the health conscious since it’s so easy to throw into meals, baked goods and post-workout smoothies. You still get the delicious flavour of peanut butter without all the calories!
Okay, we all know bacon is delicious any way you eat it. But, if you haven’t tried the combination of bacon with maple syrup, you need to, right now! These homemade granola bars are the perfect substitute for a store bought brand because you’ll know everything going into them. (No hidden ingredients!) Using maple syrup as a sweetener is one of the most natural forms of sugar. Replacing refined sugar with the same amount of maple syrup will cut the total sugar content by a third! I also recommend swapping the butter for coconut oil for added benefits.

Despite what naysayers believe, fruit is not a boring dessert option. Especially when in skewer form, topped with melted chocolate and shredded coconut. Yes, please!

Get the recipe for Pineapple, Banana, Strawberry Skewers with Salted Chocolate Drizzle


Jen Bateman, aka Dr. Jen, a food psychologist who specializes in diabetes and weight management, considers how that type of classification is a disservice to our health. “When we make foods ‘bad,’ we can set up a cycle of rebellion and craving them more,” she said. “It’s the inner teen inside us that doesn’t like to be told what to do. People feel ashamed and often feel hopeless or a sense of ‘what’s the point,’ and then they overeat to comfort.”

Dessert—quite possibly the eighth wonder of the world—sometimes gets a bad rap for packing on the calories. But here at Nutrisystem, we believe that dessert doesn’t have to demolish your healthy diet. In fact, we know there are plenty of ways to indulge without maxing out on calories or feeling the guilt that normally goes hand-in-hand with decadent treats.


Eat real food. That’s the essence of today’s nutrition message. Our knowledge of nutrition has come full circle, back to eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it. Based on a solid foundation of current nutrition science, Harvard’s Special Health Report Healthy Eating: A guide to the new nutrition describes how to eat for optimum health.

No oven? No problem! This berry tasty treats go into the freezer where the cashew, strawberry and coconut oil filling will solidify into a cool and creamy treat.

Get the recipe for Vegan Strawberry Cheesecake Bites


Believe it or not, your body is really, really good at guiding you to eat enough, choose nourishing foods and support your health. Yes, nutrition knowledge and understanding is helpful to guide that intuition, but it’s definitely there. So if you’re eating and choosing foods because of some flashy labeling or creative marketing - it’s hard to tell if you actually LIKE what you’re eating and if it even feels good to you. If you’re eating ‘til the bottom of Halo Top because it’s a ‘permitted food’, you likely aren’t paying attention to your increasing fullness, how satisfying it is, or if you’re even liking it! If we’re constantly ignoring those signals and eating until uncomfortable - albeit, ‘guilt-free’ - fullness, it makes it much harder for us to tune in and eat a satisfying amount of the real stuff and increases our dependence on filling up on the ‘guilt-free’ ones!

There's nothing sinister about these no-bake fudgy brownies. Made with good-for-you ingredients like dates, raw cocoa and natural peanut butter, they'll fuel your body instead of tiring it out.

Get the recipe for No-Bake Chocolate Crunch Brownies


No oven? No problem! This berry tasty treats go into the freezer where the cashew, strawberry and coconut oil filling will solidify into a cool and creamy treat.

Get the recipe for Vegan Strawberry Cheesecake Bites


Dessert—quite possibly the eighth wonder of the world—sometimes gets a bad rap for packing on the calories. But here at Nutrisystem, we believe that dessert doesn’t have to demolish your healthy diet. In fact, we know there are plenty of ways to indulge without maxing out on calories or feeling the guilt that normally goes hand-in-hand with decadent treats.
Hey, guys! I don't know about you, but we often find ourselves craving something sweet, especially after dinner. It's a thing. We shared our favorite sweets a couple weeks ago, and now we are going to switch gears and give you some healthier options. A lot of them involve chocolate and they are still pretty guilt-free. We'll take it! First off is this non-dairy chocolate pudding made with avocado (it's amazing).
But that’s our food reality these days. Food marketers freely use words like “guilt” and “sin” and “cheat” in the context of food, so what we eat is wrapped up in who we are and the choices we make. We judge food as being either good or bad, and then judge ourselves based on what we choose to eat. If we enjoy salad, we are good, but if we indulge in ice cream, we are bad . . . unless it’s guilt-free ice cream, of course. Doesn’t this sound absurd?
How to stop this? Train yourself to remember that healthy eating is NOT a straight and easy path. Some days we will eat too much and some days we won’t eat enough. It’s just life. Get back up and get back in the game. Go for a walk and let go of all those negative feelings. Let those endorphins get you back on the right track. After all, it’s just one meal. You have plenty more to enjoy. Start fresh again. You got this.
In a blog post for the International Food Information Council Foundation, Pike wrote how clean eating transformed from people wanting to eat more wholesome foods to it becoming “a privilege of consuming nicely packaged foods with influencer-approved ingredients,” and how this type of eating excludes those who don’t have access to upscale grocery stores. “[Clean eating] implies that those who don’t care to eat clean are unhealthy or lazy — they are eating ‘dirty,’” she wrote in the post.
Whether you want to kick your afternoon sweet habit or simply need a snack to tide you over until your next meal, you have several healthy options available. Guilt-free foods are low in calories, provide nutrients to keep you healthy and offer fiber to improve satiety. Foods ranging from carrots to dark chocolate provide the nutrition your body needs, without excessive fat and calories to make you feel guilty.
Scenario: You go to a party or get together and end up eating more than expected. Or, maybe you had a heavy breakfast that leaves you feeling gross and tired. Or you binge and all is thrown off. This might lead to you feeling disappointed and result in making some unhealthy decisions throughout the rest of the day or cause you to throw in the towel.

Zucchini adds moisture and a bit of sneaky nutrition in this classic quick bread, while chopped pecans add a crunchy twist. Make a double batch and stick a loaf in the freezer for when a craving strikes.

Get the recipe for Zucchini Bread with Pecans


Too often we are focused on calories, fat, carbs and protein and we aren’t eating food for its vitamin, mineral and phytochemical content. Eating whole foods, including healthy fats and protein, help to keep us feeling satiated, balance our energy and mood and keep carb cravings down, all of which aid in maintaining or achieving a healthy weight. So, not only does a diet full of whole foods alleviate food guilt, it also eliminates the need to count calories.

As someone who has managed a 55-pound weight loss for 16 years, Alexander knows her stuff. At the beginning of the book, she gives you options: Do you want to count calories or not? The author details a simple diet plan either way (based on your gender, age and activity level), shows you how to put together a weekly meal plan, and covers the importance of exercise.
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