It's not uncommon to be doing well on a diet but also think from time to time, "I would do anything for a giant slice of cake." Cravings for sugary, sweet, and all around indulgent desserts seem to spike and stick around whenever we've gotten used to a healthy routine, and that can feel especially true if you've decided to try the keto diet. Since the whole point of this regimen is to rely on healthy fats and oils to burn fat, plunging a fork into a dessert seems strictly off limits.

In a blog post for the International Food Information Council Foundation, Pike wrote how clean eating transformed from people wanting to eat more wholesome foods to it becoming “a privilege of consuming nicely packaged foods with influencer-approved ingredients,” and how this type of eating excludes those who don’t have access to upscale grocery stores. “[Clean eating] implies that those who don’t care to eat clean are unhealthy or lazy — they are eating ‘dirty,’” she wrote in the post.
To serve: Soak the blade of a thin knife in a cup of very hot water until warm. Slide the knife around the sides of the pan to release the cake. Place a piece of wax paper on top of the cake. Invert a plate over the wax paper and invert the pan onto the plate. Remove the pan and peel away the paper liner. Place a serving plate over the cake and turn the cake right-side up again; remove the wax paper. Dip a sharp knife in hot water and wipe it dry before cutting each slice. Serve with Candied Orange Peel, if desired.
If junk foods are “bad,” it’s human nature to try to make them good so we can continue to enjoy them without remorse. That’s where the whole guilt-free movement comes from — it’s supposed to give us permission to indulge. But it’s based on lies. The reality is that no magic wand can turn sugar and trans fat into health food, and it shouldn’t have to. It’s okay to have a treat once in a while.

There's nothing sinister about these no-bake fudgy brownies. Made with good-for-you ingredients like dates, raw cocoa and natural peanut butter, they'll fuel your body instead of tiring it out.

Get the recipe for No-Bake Chocolate Crunch Brownies


There's nothing sinister about these no-bake fudgy brownies. Made with good-for-you ingredients like dates, raw cocoa and natural peanut butter, they'll fuel your body instead of tiring it out.

Get the recipe for No-Bake Chocolate Crunch Brownies


I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
Inspired by the old-school, ultra-rich, mousselike chocolate cake that usually called for a whole pound of chocolate, half a dozen eggs and lots of butter, this enlightened rendition has deep bittersweet chocolate flavor and dense melt-in-your-mouth texture. No one will guess it's healthier. The secret is excellent natural cocoa powder and good-quality bittersweet chocolate, preferably with 70% cacao. Although the cake can be eaten once it's completely cool, it comes out of the pan much easier and even tastes better if it has been chilled at least overnight.
Guilt doesn’t work as a motivator for healthy eating — so why bother? It just makes us feel bad. Remind yourself that you do not need to succumb to the marketing ploy of “guilt-free food.” Eating is pleasure and is part of everyday life. And if you forget that, repeat these words: “I don’t have to feel guilty, because I haven’t done anything wrong.”

Protein is important on the keto diet, but too much of it will cause you to fall out of ketosis. If you are consistently eating more protein than is necessary for your body, your body will actually convert that protein into glucose, and use that glucose for energy. This is known as gluconeogenesis, which will actually break down your  lean muscle, and can also raise your blood glucose and insulin levels. Obviously, this will affect your ketosis, as you will have glucose fueling your body again.


You think that name is a mouthful, wait until you try these! Dates are one of the best foods to eat for your digestion. Their high fiber content regulates the digestive process, and they are the perfect natural sweetener for healthy desserts and snacks. Many health specialists say that eating one a day is good for a balanced diet. We’d say that stuffing one with peanut butter and covering it in dark chocolate is the best way to eat that one.
We all have cravings and impulses and urges. Heck, half the time time I don’t want to get up in the morning and go to work, or help my kids with homework, or wash dishes. These are impulses, but ultimately, I know the work needs to get done. Well, why is that different than eating? Why is it OK to succumb to our urges that push us further away from our goals, because its food? What if it was drugs? You get my point…..
To serve: Soak the blade of a thin knife in a cup of very hot water until warm. Slide the knife around the sides of the pan to release the cake. Place a piece of wax paper on top of the cake. Invert a plate over the wax paper and invert the pan onto the plate. Remove the pan and peel away the paper liner. Place a serving plate over the cake and turn the cake right-side up again; remove the wax paper. Dip a sharp knife in hot water and wipe it dry before cutting each slice. Serve with Candied Orange Peel, if desired.
PB2 AKA low carb peanut butter, is extremely versatile, so you can use it in all your favourite classic peanut butter keto recipes and more! First things first, unless you’re baking with it or using it in smoothies, you have to add water to it to (typically, two tablespoons of powdered peanut butter to one tablespoon of water). This will create a PB2 paste.

Thanks Hilda! Good to know that 6.2 is the total carb count. My mother and I made these and they turned out delicious! We will make again. The batch ended up making 27 cookies though versus 16. We followed both wet and dry ingredients so not sure why the extra. The cookies ended up being about 1.5- 2 inches in diameter.I also found this recipe on my Senza app so tracking will be easy. 😁


Simmer some peaches in a spiced maple whiskey sauce, stuff them into fluffy cinnamon rolls, top with vegan vanilla icing and all your sweet food dreams will come true.

Get the recipe for Vegan Cinnamon Rolls with Spiced Whiskey Peaches


We're making your childhood dreams come true with this safe-to-consume vegan cookie dough you can eat by the spoonful. Its secret powerhouse ingredient? Chickpeas!

Get the recipe for Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough


What else? There is never ‘guilt’ as an ingredient. I promise. Go check the back of your favorite “guilty” food, it won’t be listed. When we label foods as ‘guilt free’ it makes it seem like we should feel guilt about foods that aren’t labeled guilt free. Yikes. What’s really happening is that the labeling of this product is using basic psychology and marketing principles to make you buy their product - but it’s also changing how you feelings and thoughts about food.
“When we finally take the restrictions off our food choices, we’re less likely to crave or overeat those indulgent foods,” Pike said. “What you eat over the long haul is more important than any one particular meal or food item that you eat. Your eating patterns should be sustainable long-term, considering your taste preferences, budget and lifestyle.”

The research on the Health Halo - the idea that we make generalized assumptions about the health of a food based on a few trendy claims  - isn’t new. In the past, we’ve studied a similar phenomenon in people, being that we assume when we meet a person who is physically attractive, we also assume that the are also social, friendly, fun, competent etc. (a discussion for another day). But newer research is showing that we make these same generalizations from claims on food packaging. Foods labeled as ‘low calorie’ ‘fair trade’ ‘organic’ ‘natural’ we infer that they are superior in many ways to their shelf competitors. But not just superior - we assume it’s overall lower in calories. With fair-trade chocolate bars, there was an assumption that they ‘fair trade’ version was lower in calories - even though the way chocolate is farmed and traded doesn’t have much to do with it’s caloric content - we assume it does based on the claim!

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These light and fluffy vegan pumpkin scones are sweetened with maple syrup and topped with a luscious maple glaze, making them a pretty decadent breakfast or coffee break treat you can feel good about!

Get the recipe for Vegan Pumpkin Scones with Maple Glaze


Nothing says summer like strawberry shortcake! Sweet cashew-coconut crust is packed with a creamy strawberry filling in these raw vegan strawberry shortcake pies.

Get the recipe for No-Bake Vegan Strawberry Shortcake Pies


Jen Bateman, aka Dr. Jen, a food psychologist who specializes in diabetes and weight management, considers how that type of classification is a disservice to our health. “When we make foods ‘bad,’ we can set up a cycle of rebellion and craving them more,” she said. “It’s the inner teen inside us that doesn’t like to be told what to do. People feel ashamed and often feel hopeless or a sense of ‘what’s the point,’ and then they overeat to comfort.”

Thick Icelandic yogurt, skyr, is made into a creamy no-bake cheesecake that’s naturally high in protein and calcium, and is also gluten-free with a nut and date crust. This recipe is free of refined sugar, using maple syrup to sweeten everything up instead. Blueberries add drama and big flavour to this impressive dessert.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Blueberry Skyr Cheesecake


Snack on dried fruit between meals. Dried fruits are a sweet treat that adds fiber to your diet to keep you full until lunch or dinner. One serving -- eight dried apricot halves, three prunes or four dried apple rings -- has approximately 60 calories. These single servings also provide about 3 grams of fiber. Dole out your servings of dried fruit into individual plastic bags and keep them in your pantry. Your snacks will be pre-portioned and you'll be less likely to overindulge and consume too many calories.


Crispy rice, rich, deep chocolate and nutty peanut butter make for a tasty, indulgent square that (shhhh) is actually kind of healthy. Plus, you can satisfy your cravings for chewy chocolate brownies without turning on the oven. Bonus!

Get the recipe for No-Bake Chocolate Brownies


If you’re looking for a way to sustain your health and weight loss goals, the keto diet may be just the thing for you. It’s a high fat, low carb eating plan that forces your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When your body is in ketosis, it uses fat as its primary food source, rather than carbohydrates. Your body typically burns carbs for energy, but the goal of the keto diet is to rid your body of as many carbs as you can so that your body has to look elsewhere for fuel. It ends up burning new and stored fat for weight loss that actually lasts!
For those seeking something sweet without dunking into the decadence of chocolate, these energy balls are for you! What a fun and healthy way to enjoy the taste of homemade Snickerdoodle cookies! These delicious energy balls are loaded with oats, cashews, dates, vanilla and cinnamon to keep you enjoying the taste of homemade sweets, while treating your body right. What a classic, with a twist… well, technically a roll. Love the idea of energy balls? Check out our round-up of 4 Lip-Smacking Energy Balls for a Tastier Snack Time >
Oh well. From September, tourists in LA will be invited to marvel at these greasy artefacts of a more ignorant time, when humans ate what they wanted to eat, regardless of how processed or sugary it was, or if it was classed as “clean”, or whether its calories were “empty” or if it was presented in a cartoon-charactered tin. Before the complexities of food, and comfort, and class, were boiled down to good and bad, and then liberally distributed through supermarkets and Facebook, like a sprinkling of fine table salt.
The goal is not to demonize any kind of food. There is nothing wrong with a cookie or a piece of pizza. However, it is important to be mindful of how much and how often we eat certain foods. Seek balance and practice moderation. Remember that food is necessary for both nourishment and enjoyment. Work on not only having a healthy body, but also on having a healthy relationship with yourself and with food.

Don’t get angry. If you become angry at yourself after eating more than planned, think about why. You know one or two “out-of-the-ordinary” meals won’t reverse all of your progress. If you let minor setbacks get to you, you could be getting into a dangerous mindset. If you try to restrict and lower your calories below what Noom has set for you, you are likely to binge later on. This binge-restrict pattern is very difficult to get out of once it’s become habit. The best thing you can do for yourself after overeating is to continue as planned. Don’t try to account for the extra food, and don’t be angry at yourself. Everyone slips up in dieting, even those who have done it countless times. Forgive yourself and move on.
The Most Decadent Diet Ever! is actually NOT a diet book! It tells the story of how I’ve lost over 70 pounds and kept it off WITHOUT dieting! Then it offers over 125 incredibly decadent recipes – the stuff we all crave (like Buffalo Wings and Chocolate Layer Cake). It’s the perfect book if you think that healthy food can’t be insanely delicious AND/OR if you love to bake (though there are plenty of “real food” recipes too). The recipes are simple, but many do take a bit of time.
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