4. HEAT an 8" skillet on medium heat. Spray with cooking spray and pour about 1⁄4 cup of the batter into the skillet. Immediately tilt the skillet and swirl the batter around to coat the entire cooking surface. Cook until the bottom side is golden brown, 1 to 1½ minutes. Loosen with a spatula and flip, using the spatula and your fingers to help turn the crêpe. Cook until the opposite side is golden brown, reducing the heat to medium low if the crêpe browns too quickly, about 45 seconds. Transfer to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel.


This sandwich involves waffles, but it's more of a lunch than a breakfast thing. Want it for breakfast? No judgments. The idea is basically this: Take some greasy fried chicken and turn it into a sandwich by stuffing it between two slices of bacon-and-cheese-spiked waffles. Hard to get greasier than that. PS: This recipe calls for homemade waffles and home-fried chicken, but you can easily adapt it by using storebought frozen wafles and picking up some fried chicken from your favorite local source.
Chef and former L.A. caterer Devin Alexander has maintained a fifty-five-pound weight loss for over sixteen years by transforming the dishes she and millions of other Americans love best into guilt-free (yet still outrageously mouth-watering) indulgences--Rigatoni with Meat Sauce, BBQ Bacon Cheeseburgers, Eggplant Parmesan, Sinless Yet Sinful Sticky Buns, and even Dark Chocolate Layer Cake with Chocolate Buttercream Frosting.
The goal is not to demonize any kind of food. There is nothing wrong with a cookie or a piece of pizza. However, it is important to be mindful of how much and how often we eat certain foods. Seek balance and practice moderation. Remember that food is necessary for both nourishment and enjoyment. Work on not only having a healthy body, but also on having a healthy relationship with yourself and with food.

Eat real food. That’s the essence of today’s nutrition message. Our knowledge of nutrition has come full circle, back to eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it. Based on a solid foundation of current nutrition science, Harvard’s Special Health Report Healthy Eating: A guide to the new nutrition describes how to eat for optimum health.

These crunchy cookie bars are packed with dried cranberries and creamy chunks of sweet white chocolate. Coat them in a citrusy orange yogurt glaze and sprinkle with chopped cranberries for added texture and sweetness.

Get the recipe for White Chocolate Cranberry Cookie Bars


Inspired by the old-school, ultra-rich, mousselike chocolate cake that usually called for a whole pound of chocolate, half a dozen eggs and lots of butter, this enlightened rendition has deep bittersweet chocolate flavor and dense melt-in-your-mouth texture. No one will guess it's healthier. The secret is excellent natural cocoa powder and good-quality bittersweet chocolate, preferably with 70% cacao. Although the cake can be eaten once it's completely cool, it comes out of the pan much easier and even tastes better if it has been chilled at least overnight.
If junk foods are “bad,” it’s human nature to try to make them good so we can continue to enjoy them without remorse. That’s where the whole guilt-free movement comes from — it’s supposed to give us permission to indulge. But it’s based on lies. The reality is that no magic wand can turn sugar and trans fat into health food, and it shouldn’t have to. It’s okay to have a treat once in a while.
Research has found that the antioxidant capacity of cacao in comparison to green tea, black tea, and red wine has the greatest activity and most potential for health benefits. If you don’t know, antioxidants are those fabulous things that slow down those unwanted changes that come with aging, reduce the risk of cancer and help decrease the chances of heart disease. At only 108 calories a pop, feel free to have two or three of these eye-pleasing little bliss balls.

Coated in cinnamon-sugar and finished with melted dark or white chocolate, these delicious churro-style doughnuts — hold the deep fryer — can be made in under an hour, and are the perfect party snack. Swap regular chocolate for a dairy-free variety to make this fully vegan.

Get the recipe for Vegan Churro Doughnuts


Don’t get angry. If you become angry at yourself after eating more than planned, think about why. You know one or two “out-of-the-ordinary” meals won’t reverse all of your progress. If you let minor setbacks get to you, you could be getting into a dangerous mindset. If you try to restrict and lower your calories below what Noom has set for you, you are likely to binge later on. This binge-restrict pattern is very difficult to get out of once it’s become habit. The best thing you can do for yourself after overeating is to continue as planned. Don’t try to account for the extra food, and don’t be angry at yourself. Everyone slips up in dieting, even those who have done it countless times. Forgive yourself and move on.
The research on the Health Halo - the idea that we make generalized assumptions about the health of a food based on a few trendy claims  - isn’t new. In the past, we’ve studied a similar phenomenon in people, being that we assume when we meet a person who is physically attractive, we also assume that the are also social, friendly, fun, competent etc. (a discussion for another day). But newer research is showing that we make these same generalizations from claims on food packaging. Foods labeled as ‘low calorie’ ‘fair trade’ ‘organic’ ‘natural’ we infer that they are superior in many ways to their shelf competitors. But not just superior - we assume it’s overall lower in calories. With fair-trade chocolate bars, there was an assumption that they ‘fair trade’ version was lower in calories - even though the way chocolate is farmed and traded doesn’t have much to do with it’s caloric content - we assume it does based on the claim!
It's nearly the end of November, the traditional kick-off to holiday temptations. And it's a long season — Thanksgiving, family get togethers, office parties, New Year's Eve celebrations, right through to Superbowl Sunday. Many people find healthy eating difficult this time of year. Maybe you've settled into an exercise routine and eaten wisely for months and are worried about undoing all the good you've done. Or maybe you want to simply avoid adding pounds.

I am a big fan of coconut oil and flour for cooking as coconut feeds your digestive tract encouraging the growth of good bacteria. Did you realize that 70% of the cells in your immune system are in the digestive tract? Good reason to ensure you get the right diet and ingredients into you. Coconut also kills yeast infections such as Candida and bad bacteria while leaving the good bacteria. This book will help you utilize coconut oil and flour to the max.
Hilda Solares holds a BA in Theology from the Latin University of Theology. She has worked in a variety of positions in education with close to 30 years of experience. Hilda also has an extensive ministry background with over 25 years of service. She is the founder of Fit To Serve Group, a church community group that combines the Christian faith with that of a low carb keto diet. The group was formed in 2014 and it’s where she and her husband Randy Solares teach the community how to combine Biblical principles with healthy eating habits for greater health and wellness. Hilda was awarded top 25 Christian Cooking and Food Blog by Feedspot, and recognized by WegoHealth for her inspiring writing. Her lifework aims to encourage people to be whole in spirit, mind, and body.
Haven’t heard of a frittaffle before? Time for your life to change. This frittata-waffle is made of potatoes, bacon, eggs and cheese and then cooked in a waffle maker (mind blown). Super easy and super delicious! This savory treat will get your taste buds dancing and keep your hunger off longer, with the high protein and low sugar content. Now that you’ve heard of it, go try it!

This year, a French grocery chain created a video for Ad Week showing how customers were tricked into thinking popsicles and yogurts were different flavors based on their coloring alone. They were actually all the same flavor but red ones were guessed to be cherry or strawberry and orange ones were guessed to be apricot or orange - coloring can trick our brain into assuming taste! Similarly, when we are told that one food product is superior to another or no longer ‘off limits’ since it’s labeled ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt-free’ it can change our sensory experience with the food, making it taste better. Our positive assumptions about how healthy or good a food is for us, can also make us find it more palatable and enjoyable but if we were to step back and objectively compare them - we might not be so convinced.

If junk foods are “bad,” it’s human nature to try to make them good so we can continue to enjoy them without remorse. That’s where the whole guilt-free movement comes from — it’s supposed to give us permission to indulge. But it’s based on lies. The reality is that no magic wand can turn sugar and trans fat into health food, and it shouldn’t have to. It’s okay to have a treat once in a while.

Rich and delicious, this vegan carrot cake is filled and topped with a thick layer of dairy-free cream cheese frosting for extra creaminess in every bite.

Get the recipe for Vegan Carrot Cake with "Cream Cheese" Frosting


Sure, you could just eat cold pizza from the night before, but if you want to experience the true joy of pizza for breakfast, try this recipe. The pizza is topped with tater tots (you can choose fried or baked, but go with fried today, obviously)—plus two kinds of bacon. Oh, and there are eggs on top too. And cheese. Breakfast of champions? Yes indeed.  
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