To serve: Soak the blade of a thin knife in a cup of very hot water until warm. Slide the knife around the sides of the pan to release the cake. Place a piece of wax paper on top of the cake. Invert a plate over the wax paper and invert the pan onto the plate. Remove the pan and peel away the paper liner. Place a serving plate over the cake and turn the cake right-side up again; remove the wax paper. Dip a sharp knife in hot water and wipe it dry before cutting each slice. Serve with Candied Orange Peel, if desired.

You won’t find refined sugar or dairy in this luscious chocolate mousse made from avocados, coconut milk, coconut oil, cocoa, and dates. Because of the fibre and healthy fats found in this recipe, it won’t cause your blood sugar to spike – but it will still satisfy your chocolate craving.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Chocolate Avocado Mousse


Rather than chastising ourselves for eating ice cream, we need to congratulate ourselves for enjoying it mindfully. We need to banish the inner voices that shame us for enjoying food and replace the negative thoughts with positive ones. That will help us feel good about ourselves and our food choices, which boosts self-worth and perpetuates a positive cycle of making better choices. The goal: Get to a point where we nourish the body with nutritious food and allow treats in moderation, without any guilt or trickery.
Raw chocolate, or better known in the raw food world as “raw cacao” is an amazing source of magnesium (great for helping you relax), as well as an astounding way to gobble up antioxidants. And, it contains phenylethylamine (PEA) — this is what our brains secrete when we fall in love. Ooooh! No wonder we love Kristen Suzanne‘s Raw Double Chocolate Cherry Cheesecakes so much!

Despite what naysayers believe, fruit is not a boring dessert option. Especially when in skewer form, topped with melted chocolate and shredded coconut. Yes, please!

Get the recipe for Pineapple, Banana, Strawberry Skewers with Salted Chocolate Drizzle


UV radiation is one part of the spectrum of light that reaches the earth from the sun. At the UV end of the spectrum, the wavelengths are too short to be visible to the naked eye. They range in length from 100 to 400 nanometers (nm, or billionths of a meter) and are classified — from the longest to the shortest — as UVA (320 to 400 nm), UVB (290 to 315 nm), and UVC (100 to 280 nm). UVA rays, which penetrate deep into the skin, are responsible for tanning. UVB rays damage superficial skin cell layers, causing sunburn. UVC rays, the shortest, are considered harmless, since most UVC light is absorbed by ozone in the upper atmosphere and thus does not reach the earth. Of the UV solar radiation that does reach the earth, up to 95% is UVA, and about 5% is UVB. For years, scientists believed UVB rays were the most harmful, because sunburn is linked to melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. But since the late 1980s, we've learned that UVA rays also increase skin cancer risk — and they are the main cause of photoaging.
Don’t get angry. If you become angry at yourself after eating more than planned, think about why. You know one or two “out-of-the-ordinary” meals won’t reverse all of your progress. If you let minor setbacks get to you, you could be getting into a dangerous mindset. If you try to restrict and lower your calories below what Noom has set for you, you are likely to binge later on. This binge-restrict pattern is very difficult to get out of once it’s become habit. The best thing you can do for yourself after overeating is to continue as planned. Don’t try to account for the extra food, and don’t be angry at yourself. Everyone slips up in dieting, even those who have done it countless times. Forgive yourself and move on.
Not only does it change your buying behavior but it also changes your EATING behavior. You’re more likely to have a greater amount of an item you label as ‘guilt-free’ than one you see as neutral. Research by Brian Wansink  - a known leader in studying consumer behavior and marketing research -  has shown that labeling a food as ‘low fat’ increased the consumption of that food by as much as 50%. Regardless of the amount more we may have - the idea is that when we see a food as ‘guilt-free’ we consume more of it than we would it’s ‘guilty’ competitor.  
This recipe calls for 20 soaked and pitted Medjool dates, ¼ cup pure grade B maple syrup, ¾ cup raw and soaked cashews, 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup, and a pinch of sea salt. Simply place all the ingredients into a food processor and blend until the mixture comes together. Form into about 20 bite sized rounds roll in some unsweetened shredded coconut and store in the refrigerator.

Then we have a box of Cheetos and glass of soda. The glass of soda is a bunch of chemicals and pure sugar that has no nutrients. Just caloric energy (calories). The Cheetos are made from chemicals and wheat that has been stripped of its nutrients and processed down to flour. This process makes these foods more calorie dense and easier to consume more of.

Zucchini adds moisture and a bit of sneaky nutrition in this classic quick bread, while chopped pecans add a crunchy twist. Make a double batch and stick a loaf in the freezer for when a craving strikes.

Get the recipe for Zucchini Bread with Pecans


As someone who has managed a 55-pound weight loss for 16 years, Alexander knows her stuff. At the beginning of the book, she gives you options: Do you want to count calories or not? The author details a simple diet plan either way (based on your gender, age and activity level), shows you how to put together a weekly meal plan, and covers the importance of exercise.
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