While once museums held collections of arrowheads and rudimentary knives, visitors to this museum, which opens in LA at the end of bikini season, will enjoy a “donut gym complete with pastry dumbbells, or a life-size bowl of cereal where you suspend from the spoon to get that perfect Insta shot”. There is an area where visitors will be invited to take selfies in an oversized “hamburger dress”, and in the gift shop, to purchase merchandise embroidered with the word “Cheater”.
Hi Alisha, the recipe card does list total carb and fiber. The issue you are having is that your counting the sugar substitute but every low carb keto food blogger doesn’t count this because it’s not necessary. Here is an explanation from Swerve and includes a short video. I hope this clarifies things for you darling. I assure you that you can enjoy these treats: Erythritol is only 0.2 Calories per gram. It is listed as 25 grams of carbs by difference. In the US at least, anything that is not protein or fat when tested is automatically listed as a carb by difference. Erythritol is a sugar alcohol that is 90% processed in the small intestine. The human body cannot derive energy from erythritol (hence the low calorie count), and it has 0 glycemic impact and load (no insulin response).https://swervesweet.com/videos/swerve-and-carbohydrates
I'm a personal chef and have been cooking this way for years. Many of the recipes are those I've already lightened up myself, but a lot are new ideas. I love her recipes for sausage and other basics. She uses fewer store bought ingredients i believe than skinny girl, though ive only seen sg's tv appearances and not read all of her recipes. always better from scratch if you can do it. These recipes are simple and you'll find them delicious. I hope this inspires and teaches home cooks to adapt their own favorites. A few words of advice though with regard to things like canned tomatoes and low fat cheeses and breads etc. you may have to try a few to find ones you like that are decent. Don't toss a recipe before you do. With few ingredients the quality is super important and never, ever be tempted to use fat free cheese, it's gross! most important, pay close attention to portion. Even thougha recipe is low fat and low cal doesnt mean you can eat as much as you want!
I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
I decided to make it while my older boys were at baseball practice (so they wouldn’t see what I was making) and then give them a piece after dinner and get their feedback. They. Loved. It. When I told them it had a can of Diet Coke in it, their jaws hit the floor! You can use any kind of diet soda and any cake mix too – I’m already thinking of the yummy combos! Strawberry cake mix + orange soda, funfetti cake + lemon-lime soda, I mean seriously the list goes on and on! I’m a chocolate freak and currently trying to maintain a healthier diet, so this really hit the spot!

You won’t find refined sugar or dairy in this luscious chocolate mousse made from avocados, coconut milk, coconut oil, cocoa, and dates. Because of the fibre and healthy fats found in this recipe, it won’t cause your blood sugar to spike – but it will still satisfy your chocolate craving.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Chocolate Avocado Mousse


You won’t find refined sugar or dairy in this luscious chocolate mousse made from avocados, coconut milk, coconut oil, cocoa, and dates. Because of the fibre and healthy fats found in this recipe, it won’t cause your blood sugar to spike – but it will still satisfy your chocolate craving.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Chocolate Avocado Mousse


For those seeking something sweet without dunking into the decadence of chocolate, these energy balls are for you! What a fun and healthy way to enjoy the taste of homemade Snickerdoodle cookies! These delicious energy balls are loaded with oats, cashews, dates, vanilla and cinnamon to keep you enjoying the taste of homemade sweets, while treating your body right. What a classic, with a twist… well, technically a roll. Love the idea of energy balls? Check out our round-up of 4 Lip-Smacking Energy Balls for a Tastier Snack Time >
Oh well. From September, tourists in LA will be invited to marvel at these greasy artefacts of a more ignorant time, when humans ate what they wanted to eat, regardless of how processed or sugary it was, or if it was classed as “clean”, or whether its calories were “empty” or if it was presented in a cartoon-charactered tin. Before the complexities of food, and comfort, and class, were boiled down to good and bad, and then liberally distributed through supermarkets and Facebook, like a sprinkling of fine table salt.

If you’re looking for an alternative to cream and sugar-based ice creams, a can of coconut milk perked up with espresso beans is just the ticket. The healthy fats in coconut butter (similar to peanut butter, but made with coconut flakes instead of nuts) rounds things out.

Get the recipe for Vegan Vanilla Faux Ice Cream


Rich and delicious, this vegan carrot cake is filled and topped with a thick layer of dairy-free cream cheese frosting for extra creaminess in every bite.

Get the recipe for Vegan Carrot Cake with "Cream Cheese" Frosting


Hi Hilda, thanks for the info on the sugar and the link. Just to ensure I am understanding the #’s, is it safe to say that the total carb count is 7.3g? And of that 7.3g the sugar amount is 3.9g? I have an app I use to track and it is simple total carbs, total fat and total protein, that is as detailed as it gets. I wanted to put this recipe in that appt journal so I can track correctly.
This year, a French grocery chain created a video for Ad Week showing how customers were tricked into thinking popsicles and yogurts were different flavors based on their coloring alone. They were actually all the same flavor but red ones were guessed to be cherry or strawberry and orange ones were guessed to be apricot or orange - coloring can trick our brain into assuming taste! Similarly, when we are told that one food product is superior to another or no longer ‘off limits’ since it’s labeled ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt-free’ it can change our sensory experience with the food, making it taste better. Our positive assumptions about how healthy or good a food is for us, can also make us find it more palatable and enjoyable but if we were to step back and objectively compare them - we might not be so convinced.
Don't feel guilty if you need your daily chocolate fix. Dark chocolate that is 70 to 85 percent cacao offers around 90 calories per half-ounce serving. In 2011, Boston-based researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted a review of the benefits of dark chocolate. Published in the "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition," the study reported that consuming dark chocolate on a daily basis for two to 12 weeks improves blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol. This is the harmful cholesterol that hardens arteries and increases your risk of heart disease. Although dark chocolate can be beneficial for your heart, keep your serving size to a half-ounce to avoid consuming a high amount of calories.
Quick story: My brother recently moved to Bermuda for work and went to a new dentist there. While the dentist was introducing himself - doing his spiel - he touted to my brother, “And I want you to know, we’re very proud that all of our equipment is totally sterile and we check it before each patient - just like in the States!” Not only did this make my brother think about the possibility of non-sterile equipment being used but it also created doubt about other dentists in Bermuda! (and was a funny story) Point is: making a statement like this - even if it’s about something that didn’t cross your mind earlier, or that you already assumed to be true, creates doubt about other products that don’t advertise that feature.
Those who “cheat” at the modern rules of eating, where the ultimate aim appears to be a white-eyed kind of superior weightlessness, are now so laughably old-fashioned that Americans (nearly 40% of whom are obese) are being invited to pay $38 to dress up as them, being photographed with pizza as a document of how far it’s possible to fall. Into a cereal bowl, into a pit, into a dark and terrifying place where you are a walking burger and no longer in control.

These light and fluffy vegan pumpkin scones are sweetened with maple syrup and topped with a luscious maple glaze, making them a pretty decadent breakfast or coffee break treat you can feel good about!

Get the recipe for Vegan Pumpkin Scones with Maple Glaze


Author Devin Alexander makes it easy. Each recipe is either 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 calories (within 10 calories), so it's easy to track your calories without a calculator. The dishes are, for the most part, healthy versions of your old favorite fattening ones. So, for example, instead of the typical 746-calorie, 38-grams-of-fat slice of chocolate cake, you can have a slice of Dark Chocolate Layer Cake with Buttercream Frosting for 294 calories and 6 grams of fat.
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