Finally, I learned about functional medicine and found a practitioner that I hoped could help me. They ran specialized tests that were far different than I had ever had before. When I got the results back, it turned out I had candida, parasites, high cortisol, the Epstein Bar Virus and many food intolerances. I also had an issue with my thyroid that no one found before because they were using the conventional medicine lab ranges which are way too broad….which I now know is one of the leading causes of hypothyroid misdiagnosis.

The idea that all of our weight gain is tied to lack of exercise is not born out by data, and it’s a myth perpetuated by the exercise industry, and producers of harmful foods that want to convince you that you can still consume their product if you just get off your lazy butt, effectively blaming us for the impact of what they encourage us to consume from infancy.

It’s not so long ago that to be thought of as a “picky eater” was something to be avoided at all costs. “More tripe please!” you’d gag, spooning remnants of emulsified cabbage into your mouth to get rid of the taste of undiluted Vimto, secure in the knowledge there would be pink Angel Delight as soon as you’d cleaned your plate. Until: suddenly not. Suddenly the concept blossomed, its roots cracking the tarmac and altering the landscape, causing pile-ups. And here we are in a time when to be a picky eater is simply to be “educated”, adult, conscious, in pursuit of physical health at both emotional and social cost, and also, importantly, better than you.

If it wasn’t supposed to be pleasurable, why do we have taste buds? Oh, right, because pleasurable foods tell our brains that we enjoy this thing. Also, it’s how we learn nutrition, our brains learn the outcome of ingesting different nutrients and then triggers cravings for things that will replenish those deficiencies. Yes, there are the sweet tooth cravings and such, but fundamentally, we learn to eat due to pleasurable responses TO what we eat.
Potatoes or any other vegetable cooked with or dressed with butter/healthy oils -  As long as you aren’t eating reconstituted fries from a drive-thru, potatoes in the form of wedges, baked with sour cream and bacon, mashed, or boiled are all full of the many vitamins and minerals that potatoes have to offer such as Vitamin C, B-6, iron, potassium and fibre. Potatoes also have ⅓ of the carbs and calories that pasta and bread have, so they shouldn’t be put in the same category as these more carb/starch dense foods. Dress other vegetables in a salad with plenty of olive oil, and bake or saute vegetables with butter, coconut oil, avocado oil or canola oil.
Hey, guys! I don't know about you, but we often find ourselves craving something sweet, especially after dinner. It's a thing. We shared our favorite sweets a couple weeks ago, and now we are going to switch gears and give you some healthier options. A lot of them involve chocolate and they are still pretty guilt-free. We'll take it! First off is this non-dairy chocolate pudding made with avocado (it's amazing).

This delicious and decadent vegan salted caramel apple crumble tart is absolutely perfect for fall, but definitely one to add to your arsenal year round!

Get the recipe for Vegan Apple Crumble Tart with Salted Caramel


These crunchy cookie bars are packed with dried cranberries and creamy chunks of sweet white chocolate. Coat them in a citrusy orange yogurt glaze and sprinkle with chopped cranberries for added texture and sweetness.

Get the recipe for White Chocolate Cranberry Cookie Bars


I am a big fan of coconut oil and flour for cooking as coconut feeds your digestive tract encouraging the growth of good bacteria. Did you realize that 70% of the cells in your immune system are in the digestive tract? Good reason to ensure you get the right diet and ingredients into you. Coconut also kills yeast infections such as Candida and bad bacteria while leaving the good bacteria. This book will help you utilize coconut oil and flour to the max.
Crêpes are easy to make—once you get the hang of it. Some tips: Tilt the skillet immediately after pouring in the batter so it thinly coats the entire cooking surface, and make sure the pan is hot enough so that the crêpe cooks quickly and doesn’t stick (it should sizzle a little on contact). Also take the crêpe out of the pan as soon as both sides are light golden brown so it’s tender, not crispy.
As someone who has managed a 55-pound weight loss for 16 years, Alexander knows her stuff. At the beginning of the book, she gives you options: Do you want to count calories or not? The author details a simple diet plan either way (based on your gender, age and activity level), shows you how to put together a weekly meal plan, and covers the importance of exercise.
×