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creamy, rich, and chocolatey I happened upon this recipe, and boy am I glad. It's a little time consuming, but there are shortcuts. I pre melted the chocolate (whole squares, not grated) in the microwave. Just enough to be moveable, not totally melted. Then, I added the cocoa with a little instant coffee. From there I added the hot liquid and it melted it the rest of the way. I also used a springform pan. It worked fine. I left the cake in the fridge overnight, and tried a piece the next day with a little whipped cream. I didn't do the orange part of the recipe. I just did the cake. I usually have a lindor dark chocolate truffle once a day, but now I think I'm going to have a thin slice of this. I'm also going to cut and freeze all the pieces and take them out as I need them. This is an awesome cake for so little calories. I also didn't add the rest of the sugar when I did the egg whites. It was sweet enough. Perfect chocolate fix. Maybe I'll experiment with it a little more when I make it again. DEEEELLLIIISSHHH.
Kelley Herring had to win over her health condition that went misdiagnosed for two full years. She learned that her sickness was a result of yeast infection,  sugars,  and preservatives in her diet and came to realize how a diet can break or build a person. Now, Kelly is the CEO, of Healing Gourmet website. She has written a number of resources on healthy eating and authored Healing Gourmet and Eat to Beat Diabetes that was published by McGraw-Hill back in 2005. Kelley has gathered ways to improve her health by simple changes in her lifestyle. She targeted mainly nutritional biochemistry, and learned how food compounds can help improve health and fight diseases. Kelley professionally leads a team of dieticians, doctors and chefs to create tools and resources on proper eating and nutrition.
Some of the ingredients in real ice cream - like fat and milk - are what make ice cream creamy, smooth, and satisfying! Those are also the things that make you naturally stop eating ice cream when you do feel satisfied and are allowing yourself to enjoy it. When we restrict ourselves of certain foods, it makes the sensory reward of those foods increase. All these effects of food marketing and diet culture make it hard to believe that you aren’t just a bottomless pit who can’t control yourself around certain foods - but you aren’t. Eating foods - especially ones that you like and taste good - doesn’t make you guilty of anything.  

You do your best to eat a balanced, healthy diet most days of the year (or maybe you don't). But if there's one time you should definitely feel entitled to give it a rest, it's National Greasy Foods Day on Oct. 25. Need convincing? Check out these phenomenally decadent dishes, which celebrate grease in all its crunchy, bacony, cheesy, buttery, not-so-good-for-you glory. Pick your favorite—or try them all and keep the celebration going on and on.
If it wasn’t supposed to be pleasurable, why do we have taste buds? Oh, right, because pleasurable foods tell our brains that we enjoy this thing. Also, it’s how we learn nutrition, our brains learn the outcome of ingesting different nutrients and then triggers cravings for things that will replenish those deficiencies. Yes, there are the sweet tooth cravings and such, but fundamentally, we learn to eat due to pleasurable responses TO what we eat.

Crispy rice, rich, deep chocolate and nutty peanut butter make for a tasty, indulgent square that (shhhh) is actually kind of healthy. Plus, you can satisfy your cravings for chewy chocolate brownies without turning on the oven. Bonus!

Get the recipe for No-Bake Chocolate Brownies


This basic (and delicious) vegan cookie recipe can be used in a variety of tasty ways. Try peanut butter and peanuts in place of chocolate chips, or adding mini vegan marshmallows on top and broiling for a torched effect.

Get the recipe for Vegan Chocolate Cookies


Blueberries are low in calories, high in fiber and rich in antioxidants. They have about 60 calories and nearly 3 grams of fiber in 3/4 cup. Powerful antioxidant flavonoids called anthocyanins are particularly high in blueberries. Anthocyanins neutralize damaging free radicals that boost your risk of chronic diseases by increasing oxidative stress on cells. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health published a study on anthocyanins and published their work in a 2012 publication of "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." They found that consuming at least two servings of anthocyanin-rich blueberries each week lessens oxidative stress in your system and minimizes your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
In the past few years, the term “guilt-free comfort food” has been circulating on the internet and becoming prevalent in the marketing of food. Halo Top and the ilk advertise a guilt-free experience and Fitness magazine, The Daily Meal and Food Network have published roundup articles on guilt-free recipes. Many of these recipes substitute baked for fried, or they feature swaps like mac and cheese made with reduced-fat cheese or “ice cream” made with yogurt and vegan protein powder.

She further explained that having a positive attitude toward food is best for our emotional well-being. “In practice, this would mean feeling freedom to eat a range of food, including so-called ‘unhealthy’ options,” she said. “However, many people require support to be able to do this, particularly if they are using food for emotional regulation purposes ― they are using food for comfort or distraction the way others may use alcohol, shopping and sex. If the person identifies as having a true sugar addiction, striving for complete abstinence is wise.”

Darshana Thacker is chef and culinary project manager for Forks Over Knives. A graduate of the Natural Gourmet Institute, she is the author of Forks Over Knives: Flavor! She created the recipes for Forks Over Knives Family and was a lead recipe contributor to the New York Times bestseller The Forks Over Knives Plan. Her recipes have been published in The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook, Forks Over Knives—The Cookbook, Forks Over Knives: The Plant-Based Way to Health, and LA Yoga magazine online. Visit DarshanasKitchen.com for more.

Guilt doesn’t work as a motivator for healthy eating — so why bother? It just makes us feel bad. Remind yourself that you do not need to succumb to the marketing ploy of “guilt-free food.” Eating is pleasure and is part of everyday life. And if you forget that, repeat these words: “I don’t have to feel guilty, because I haven’t done anything wrong.”

The research on the Health Halo - the idea that we make generalized assumptions about the health of a food based on a few trendy claims  - isn’t new. In the past, we’ve studied a similar phenomenon in people, being that we assume when we meet a person who is physically attractive, we also assume that the are also social, friendly, fun, competent etc. (a discussion for another day). But newer research is showing that we make these same generalizations from claims on food packaging. Foods labeled as ‘low calorie’ ‘fair trade’ ‘organic’ ‘natural’ we infer that they are superior in many ways to their shelf competitors. But not just superior - we assume it’s overall lower in calories. With fair-trade chocolate bars, there was an assumption that they ‘fair trade’ version was lower in calories - even though the way chocolate is farmed and traded doesn’t have much to do with it’s caloric content - we assume it does based on the claim!
Meanwhile, the tanning industry makes misleading claims for the healthfulness of indoor tanning. One claim is that it helps build a base that protects against sunburn. It does, but only slightly — the equivalent of a sunscreen rated SPF 4 or less. Another claim is that tanning is a good way to stimulate the skin's production of vitamin D, a hormone that's essential to bone health and has been linked to a reduced risk for several cancers. But you can get all the vitamin D you need in a daily vitamin D supplement, which offers all the benefits without any of the risks to your skin.

I am a big fan of coconut oil and flour for cooking as coconut feeds your digestive tract encouraging the growth of good bacteria. Did you realize that 70% of the cells in your immune system are in the digestive tract? Good reason to ensure you get the right diet and ingredients into you. Coconut also kills yeast infections such as Candida and bad bacteria while leaving the good bacteria. This book will help you utilize coconut oil and flour to the max.

It was late, and I was in town alone after seeing Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again and, as well as being elated and raw with emotion, I was suddenly starving. That panicky kind of hunger where it’s dangerous to go into Tesco because you know you’ll leave with a bag for life swollen with Nik Naks and coffee drinks and yesterday’s sushi, then still need some toast when you get in. And then I remembered burgers.
But that’s our food reality these days. Food marketers freely use words like “guilt” and “sin” and “cheat” in the context of food, so what we eat is wrapped up in who we are and the choices we make. We judge food as being either good or bad, and then judge ourselves based on what we choose to eat. If we enjoy salad, we are good, but if we indulge in ice cream, we are bad . . . unless it’s guilt-free ice cream, of course. Doesn’t this sound absurd?
Food guilt is something a lot of people struggle with daily and it’s no wonder since the messages around us are constantly telling us to eat less red meat, that eggs are high in cholesterol, that all carbs are bad, that you must eat non-GMO and 100% organic, that saturated fat is bad and too much fruit is bad - it’s no wonder the population is confused and feeling guilty! Not only that, but many of us are trying to lose a few extra pounds, so even if healthy food is being consumed, there is still a lot of guilt experienced around the amount of calories one has probably eaten.
Why would you have plain old sweet-potato fries when you can wrap them in bacon? This recipe calls for just two ingredients: sweet potatoes and bacon. The only trick is twirling the bacon around the sweet potato fries, but it's pretty darn easy. What you end up with is a surprisingly attractive party hors d'oeuvre (if you don't devour them all yourself, of course).  
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