Who doesn’t love a good brownie for dessert? The problem is that traditional brownies are full of sugar, artificial ingredients, and gluten which is not something you would want to include as part of a healthy diet. However, this doesn’t mean that you can never enjoy a brownie again it just means that you have to get creative with how you make your brownie recipes.

Vegans and non-vegans alike will love this creamy cheesecake. Top with fresh berries or a fresh lemon curd for a light finish to any meal.

Get the recipe for Raw Vanilla Cheesecake with Chocolate Almond Crust


In the past few years, the term “guilt-free comfort food” has been circulating on the internet and becoming prevalent in the marketing of food. Halo Top and the ilk advertise a guilt-free experience and Fitness magazine, The Daily Meal and Food Network have published roundup articles on guilt-free recipes. Many of these recipes substitute baked for fried, or they feature swaps like mac and cheese made with reduced-fat cheese or “ice cream” made with yogurt and vegan protein powder.
Butter, cheese, full fat milk, yogurt, sour cream, cream, beef, pork and nuts - The common thread here is that many still are confused about fat since it was wrongfully demonized in the 1970s. The fats that are found in these foods are long chain fatty acids (LCFA) and form the core structural fats in the body comprising 75 - 80% of fatty acids in most cells. LCFA, along with monounsaturated fats (MFA) are the body’s preferred fuel source. Well conducted and replicated research has shown that these fats reduce the risk of heart disease by increasing HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol. These fats also help to increase muscle mass and stabilize energy and mood.
Kelley Herring had to win over her health condition that went misdiagnosed for two full years. She learned that her sickness was a result of yeast infection,  sugars,  and preservatives in her diet and came to realize how a diet can break or build a person. Now, Kelly is the CEO, of Healing Gourmet website. She has written a number of resources on healthy eating and authored Healing Gourmet and Eat to Beat Diabetes that was published by McGraw-Hill back in 2005. Kelley has gathered ways to improve her health by simple changes in her lifestyle. She targeted mainly nutritional biochemistry, and learned how food compounds can help improve health and fight diseases. Kelley professionally leads a team of dieticians, doctors and chefs to create tools and resources on proper eating and nutrition.

Thick Icelandic yogurt, skyr, is made into a creamy no-bake cheesecake that’s naturally high in protein and calcium, and is also gluten-free with a nut and date crust. This recipe is free of refined sugar, using maple syrup to sweeten everything up instead. Blueberries add drama and big flavour to this impressive dessert.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Blueberry Skyr Cheesecake


Though the ketogenic diet is a great healthy option, there are some people, in special circumstances, who should not try a ketogenic diet. Some of these special circumstances include: pregnant or breastfeeding women, and athletes who are starting a new season. Individuals with kidney stones or gallbladder issues should discuss their diet plans with a medical professional before starting on a ketogenic diet.

If you’re looking for a way to sustain your health and weight loss goals, the keto diet may be just the thing for you. It’s a high fat, low carb eating plan that forces your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When your body is in ketosis, it uses fat as its primary food source, rather than carbohydrates. Your body typically burns carbs for energy, but the goal of the keto diet is to rid your body of as many carbs as you can so that your body has to look elsewhere for fuel. It ends up burning new and stored fat for weight loss that actually lasts!

These rich chocolate almond doughnuts are vegan and easy to make. You won't have to fumble with a special doughnut pan either since the dough rolls and cuts with ease.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson's Vegan Baked Chocolate Almond Doughnuts


For those seeking something sweet without dunking into the decadence of chocolate, these energy balls are for you! What a fun and healthy way to enjoy the taste of homemade Snickerdoodle cookies! These delicious energy balls are loaded with oats, cashews, dates, vanilla and cinnamon to keep you enjoying the taste of homemade sweets, while treating your body right. What a classic, with a twist… well, technically a roll. Love the idea of energy balls? Check out our round-up of 4 Lip-Smacking Energy Balls for a Tastier Snack Time >


While once museums held collections of arrowheads and rudimentary knives, visitors to this museum, which opens in LA at the end of bikini season, will enjoy a “donut gym complete with pastry dumbbells, or a life-size bowl of cereal where you suspend from the spoon to get that perfect Insta shot”. There is an area where visitors will be invited to take selfies in an oversized “hamburger dress”, and in the gift shop, to purchase merchandise embroidered with the word “Cheater”.

Meet the powerhouse dish good for all occasions: on-the-go breakfast, post-workout snack or sweet dessert. Bonus: the granola bars are no-bake and can be whipped up in 20 minutes.

Get the recipe for No-Bake Fruit and Nut Granola Bars


I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.

Oats are one of the more protein-dense whole grains, combined here with tender apples and the real protein star of this breakfast: yogurt. Use unsweetened Greek yogurt for the most protein and lowest sugar option. No more blood sugar crashes!

Get the recipe for Bobby Flay's Baked Apples with Oatmeal and Yogurt


If you find yourself craving something sweet try one of these quick, simple, and delicious guilt-free desserts instead. You will find that healthy eating doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the occasional sweet treat it just means that there are healthier ways to enjoy them. Give these recipes a try, and you may be surprised at how much they satisfy that sweet tooth craving. Plus, you won’t have to worry about feeling guilty after eating them. It’s a win, win!

Some of the ingredients in real ice cream - like fat and milk - are what make ice cream creamy, smooth, and satisfying! Those are also the things that make you naturally stop eating ice cream when you do feel satisfied and are allowing yourself to enjoy it. When we restrict ourselves of certain foods, it makes the sensory reward of those foods increase. All these effects of food marketing and diet culture make it hard to believe that you aren’t just a bottomless pit who can’t control yourself around certain foods - but you aren’t. Eating foods - especially ones that you like and taste good - doesn’t make you guilty of anything.  
Living organisms maintain themselves by acquiring nutrients from their environments. The energy they extract from their environments permits them to initiate controlled movements. Basically, we are supposed to move, and by doing so we utilize nutrients we obtain from food. I dont think food enjoyment and pleasure is really a primal animal instinct. 😉
While once museums held collections of arrowheads and rudimentary knives, visitors to this museum, which opens in LA at the end of bikini season, will enjoy a “donut gym complete with pastry dumbbells, or a life-size bowl of cereal where you suspend from the spoon to get that perfect Insta shot”. There is an area where visitors will be invited to take selfies in an oversized “hamburger dress”, and in the gift shop, to purchase merchandise embroidered with the word “Cheater”.
its raelly obvious, if your favorite food is bad for you guess what NO WEIGHT HAHA! actually, that would be really bad cuz a. when most people hear this there gunna be like yes! and eat a lot of junk food, but you can still get diabetes and stuff and by the time you stop its too late, and b. gaining weight is important to health if you don't you die :p (red is still better cuz fav food is prob bad for you eat anything you can vary so die either way but watevs)

This easy, no-churn vegan ice cream is going to become your new go-to treat this summer; it’s creamy, minty, refreshing and totally dairy-free.

Get the recipe for Vegan Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream


This delicious and decadent vegan salted caramel apple crumble tart is absolutely perfect for fall, but definitely one to add to your arsenal year round!

Get the recipe for Vegan Apple Crumble Tart with Salted Caramel


In the past few years, the term “guilt-free comfort food” has been circulating on the internet and becoming prevalent in the marketing of food. Halo Top and the ilk advertise a guilt-free experience and Fitness magazine, The Daily Meal and Food Network have published roundup articles on guilt-free recipes. Many of these recipes substitute baked for fried, or they feature swaps like mac and cheese made with reduced-fat cheese or “ice cream” made with yogurt and vegan protein powder.

I've made so far: The chocolate chip pancakes. Amazing tasting, speedy and a great breakfast. Breakfast nachos! Better than expected and took all of 5 minutes. Sausage Biscuit, a more time intensive meal but I found the end result great. I actually used the leftovers to make things other than sausage biscuits such as a reasonably sized sausage sub for lunch as well. The biscuits were so good that I ate a couple on their own!
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