If you want to beat food guilt, think about why you have it in the first place. What triggers your guilt? It might be specific foods or it might be an internal feeling. Now think about why. Do you feel bloated after you eat it? Did someone once tell you that X food was healthier than Y food and now you feel bad after eating Y food? Once you find the root of your guilt, you can start to alleviate it.
I like how it also delves into using ingredients that are rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants protect us from aging helping our skin to stay youthful and radiant. Cocoa powder is one recommendation as it has a whopping ORAC score of 80,933 – about 14 times higher than blueberries. My all time favorite though is Clove oil where 1 drop is equal to about 400 cups of blueberries!

Never heard of PB2 before? You’re in for a treat! It’s peanut butter in powdered form, made by pressing peanuts to remove their natural oils and fat content. In the end, you get a powdered peanut butter that has about 85% to 90% fewer calories than traditional peanut butter! PB2 has become a go-to for the health conscious since it’s so easy to throw into meals, baked goods and post-workout smoothies. You still get the delicious flavour of peanut butter without all the calories!
Eat real food. That’s the essence of today’s nutrition message. Our knowledge of nutrition has come full circle, back to eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it. Based on a solid foundation of current nutrition science, Harvard’s Special Health Report Healthy Eating: A guide to the new nutrition describes how to eat for optimum health.
Dessert—quite possibly the eighth wonder of the world—sometimes gets a bad rap for packing on the calories. But here at Nutrisystem, we believe that dessert doesn’t have to demolish your healthy diet. In fact, we know there are plenty of ways to indulge without maxing out on calories or feeling the guilt that normally goes hand-in-hand with decadent treats.
Your use of this website constitutes and manifests your acceptance of our User Agreement, Privacy Policy, Cookie Notification, and awareness of the California Privacy Rights. Pursuant to U.S. Copyright law, as well as other applicable federal and state laws, the content on this website may not be reproduced, distributed, displayed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, without the prior, express, and written permission of Athlon Media Group. Ad Choices
Then we have a box of Cheetos and glass of soda. The glass of soda is a bunch of chemicals and pure sugar that has no nutrients. Just caloric energy (calories). The Cheetos are made from chemicals and wheat that has been stripped of its nutrients and processed down to flour. This process makes these foods more calorie dense and easier to consume more of.
Well, buckle up, because these healthy desserts are about to take you on an unexpected, yet truly exciting ride. This means we’re not talking about chocolate covered strawberries—as tasty as they are. From potassium-packed chocolate banana bread muffins to “clean” cookie dough (that’s totally safe to eat raw), these amazing healthy desserts prove that healthy eating doesn’t have to mean salads without dressing. What’s more, making healthy choices can mean actually looking forward to what you eat.
Your use of this website constitutes and manifests your acceptance of our User Agreement, Privacy Policy, Cookie Notification, and awareness of the California Privacy Rights. Pursuant to U.S. Copyright law, as well as other applicable federal and state laws, the content on this website may not be reproduced, distributed, displayed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, without the prior, express, and written permission of Athlon Media Group. Ad Choices
Jen Bateman, aka Dr. Jen, a food psychologist who specializes in diabetes and weight management, considers how that type of classification is a disservice to our health. “When we make foods ‘bad,’ we can set up a cycle of rebellion and craving them more,” she said. “It’s the inner teen inside us that doesn’t like to be told what to do. People feel ashamed and often feel hopeless or a sense of ‘what’s the point,’ and then they overeat to comfort.”
It's nearly the end of November, the traditional kick-off to holiday temptations. And it's a long season — Thanksgiving, family get togethers, office parties, New Year's Eve celebrations, right through to Superbowl Sunday. Many people find healthy eating difficult this time of year. Maybe you've settled into an exercise routine and eaten wisely for months and are worried about undoing all the good you've done. Or maybe you want to simply avoid adding pounds.

If you enjoy articles and recipes like these and want more, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App. For those that don’t have it, it’s a brilliant food app available for both Android and iPhone. It’s a great resource for anyone looking to cut out or reduce allergens like meat, dairy, soy, gluten, eggs, grains, and more find awesome recipes, cooking tips, articles, product recommendations and how-tos. The app shows you how having diet/health/food preferences can be full of delicious abundance rather than restrictions.

These vegan muffins prove you can whip up a delicious baked good when low on pantry staples. Switch up the pears and pecans in this recipe for whichever fruits and nuts you have on hand.

Get the recipe for Vegan Pear, Cranberry and Pecan Muffins


I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
Thanks Hilda! Good to know that 6.2 is the total carb count. My mother and I made these and they turned out delicious! We will make again. The batch ended up making 27 cookies though versus 16. We followed both wet and dry ingredients so not sure why the extra. The cookies ended up being about 1.5- 2 inches in diameter.I also found this recipe on my Senza app so tracking will be easy. 😁
Jen Bateman, aka Dr. Jen, a food psychologist who specializes in diabetes and weight management, considers how that type of classification is a disservice to our health. “When we make foods ‘bad,’ we can set up a cycle of rebellion and craving them more,” she said. “It’s the inner teen inside us that doesn’t like to be told what to do. People feel ashamed and often feel hopeless or a sense of ‘what’s the point,’ and then they overeat to comfort.”
It's nearly the end of November, the traditional kick-off to holiday temptations. And it's a long season — Thanksgiving, family get togethers, office parties, New Year's Eve celebrations, right through to Superbowl Sunday. Many people find healthy eating difficult this time of year. Maybe you've settled into an exercise routine and eaten wisely for months and are worried about undoing all the good you've done. Or maybe you want to simply avoid adding pounds.
A healthy fudge that takes ten minutes to make. Say what?! This rich fudge is the perfect combo of super food ingredients that will grab your hunger’s attention. With the calorie count low, make these into fudge bars with two servings worth. Change up the toppings each time you make these with some other nutrient dense foods (even try something like cayenne to give it a little kick)!
If you're from the South, you know all about chicken-fried steak: It's not chicken, it's steak—but it's deep-fried like fried chicken. Got it? Now make this brilliant version: Get some cube steak, cut it into fingers, and coat it in flour, saltine crackers and spices before giving it the deep-fry treatment. Make sure to dip the fingers in the mayo-mustard-sour cream mixture for extra decadence.
×