“There are an abundance of messages that tell overweight people it should be easy to lose or maintain a healthy weight,” she said. “For instance, ‘just eat less and move more.’ There are a lot of negative and shaming words and phrases around food: ‘I shouldn’t,’ ‘it’s naughty,’ ‘it’s a treat,’ ‘I’ve been good, so I’ll have one.’ We are wired to move away from pain, so the term ‘guilt-free’ likely provides a sense of relief that comes from reading a ‘guilt-free’ message before buying, and it helps marketers sell their products.”
17. Heavenly Blueberry and Cream Dessert: Heavenly is the absolute right word to describe this dessert. Use a store-bought angel food cake to save yourself some time and layer it with homemade whipped cream and fresh blueberries. Stick the completed trifle in the fridge and try to distract yourself for the next two hours while it chills. (via Mel’s Kitchen Cafe)
What is it about these foods that make us feel guilty? It’s different for everyone. Generally speaking, American society’s obsession with healthy eating can make it seem “better” to opt for a salad (nutritious, lower in calories, green) rather than a burger (oily, higher in calories, processed). In some cases, people have arbitrarily decided (perhaps after reading a misguided article or two) what foods are “good” or “bad” and feel guilty after eating a “bad’ food as a result of this categorization.
Potatoes or any other vegetable cooked with or dressed with butter/healthy oils -  As long as you aren’t eating reconstituted fries from a drive-thru, potatoes in the form of wedges, baked with sour cream and bacon, mashed, or boiled are all full of the many vitamins and minerals that potatoes have to offer such as Vitamin C, B-6, iron, potassium and fibre. Potatoes also have ⅓ of the carbs and calories that pasta and bread have, so they shouldn’t be put in the same category as these more carb/starch dense foods. Dress other vegetables in a salad with plenty of olive oil, and bake or saute vegetables with butter, coconut oil, avocado oil or canola oil.

Thick Icelandic yogurt, skyr, is made into a creamy no-bake cheesecake that’s naturally high in protein and calcium, and is also gluten-free with a nut and date crust. This recipe is free of refined sugar, using maple syrup to sweeten everything up instead. Blueberries add drama and big flavour to this impressive dessert.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Blueberry Skyr Cheesecake


Food guilt is something a lot of people struggle with daily and it’s no wonder since the messages around us are constantly telling us to eat less red meat, that eggs are high in cholesterol, that all carbs are bad, that you must eat non-GMO and 100% organic, that saturated fat is bad and too much fruit is bad - it’s no wonder the population is confused and feeling guilty! Not only that, but many of us are trying to lose a few extra pounds, so even if healthy food is being consumed, there is still a lot of guilt experienced around the amount of calories one has probably eaten.
Oh....my.....GOSH!!! I loved this!!!! This was so delicious. Amazingly, delightfully, spoon-and-plate-lickingly good! No one will ever guess that it is reasonably healthy. Wow! It tastes like you bought it at a high-end pastry shop. If you or your guests are chocolate fans you HAVE TO make this!!!! It's one of the best things that I've ever made. A couple tips: if you can find them, bittersweet chocolate chips will make your life easier so you don't have to chop up the chocolate. Use good quality chocolate. Bittersweet isn't the same as semisweet. If you do use semisweet, you'll probably want to cut down on the sugar. I used Camino organic bittersweet chips and they were fantastic. If you want the cake to have the right height: 1. beat the heck out of the egg whites. They need to be STIFF. It will take several minutes. 2. Make sure to fold, not stir in the eggwhites. If you're not sure how to do either of these, just google it. I used a 9" pan and it rose to the top of the pan and looked just like the photo. The cake is VERY intense, rich and chocolaty. I cut it into 8 pieces but I think at that size it was almost too intense. I'd suggest that you stick to what the recipe says and cut into 12 pieces. The piece will be small but very satisfying. Then if anyone wants more, they can go ahead (One of my guests left about 1/4 of her piece and then threw it in the garbage. I wanted to cry!) I lined the bottom AND the sides with 2 pieces of parchment paper that hung over the sides

This year, a French grocery chain created a video for Ad Week showing how customers were tricked into thinking popsicles and yogurts were different flavors based on their coloring alone. They were actually all the same flavor but red ones were guessed to be cherry or strawberry and orange ones were guessed to be apricot or orange - coloring can trick our brain into assuming taste! Similarly, when we are told that one food product is superior to another or no longer ‘off limits’ since it’s labeled ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt-free’ it can change our sensory experience with the food, making it taste better. Our positive assumptions about how healthy or good a food is for us, can also make us find it more palatable and enjoyable but if we were to step back and objectively compare them - we might not be so convinced.
What else? There is never ‘guilt’ as an ingredient. I promise. Go check the back of your favorite “guilty” food, it won’t be listed. When we label foods as ‘guilt free’ it makes it seem like we should feel guilt about foods that aren’t labeled guilt free. Yikes. What’s really happening is that the labeling of this product is using basic psychology and marketing principles to make you buy their product - but it’s also changing how you feelings and thoughts about food.
“Food is not morally good or bad,” said Alyssa Pike, a registered dietician and the nutrition communications coordinator for the International Food Information Council Foundation. “It’s only when you categorize it that way when feelings of shame or guilt become associated with certain foods. Once we stop labeling foods as good or bad, we can stop feeling guilty about them.”

Zucchini adds moisture and a bit of sneaky nutrition in this classic quick bread, while chopped pecans add a crunchy twist. Make a double batch and stick a loaf in the freezer for when a craving strikes.

Get the recipe for Zucchini Bread with Pecans


Never heard of PB2 before? You’re in for a treat! It’s peanut butter in powdered form, made by pressing peanuts to remove their natural oils and fat content. In the end, you get a powdered peanut butter that has about 85% to 90% fewer calories than traditional peanut butter! PB2 has become a go-to for the health conscious since it’s so easy to throw into meals, baked goods and post-workout smoothies. You still get the delicious flavour of peanut butter without all the calories!

If you find yourself craving something sweet try one of these quick, simple, and delicious guilt-free desserts instead. You will find that healthy eating doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the occasional sweet treat it just means that there are healthier ways to enjoy them. Give these recipes a try, and you may be surprised at how much they satisfy that sweet tooth craving. Plus, you won’t have to worry about feeling guilty after eating them. It’s a win, win!


Step aside grocery store brands, these homemade snack bars are the ultimate midday fix. The sweet but sour flavor from the dried cherries is a game changer. These can be wrapped individually just like the ones bought at the store and taken to eat daily. Cherries are a low-calorie fruit with anti-inflammatory properties as well as high in vitamins and nutrients.

Vegans and non-vegans alike will love this creamy cheesecake. Top with fresh berries or a fresh lemon curd for a light finish to any meal.

Get the recipe for Raw Vanilla Cheesecake with Chocolate Almond Crust


This basic (and delicious) vegan cookie recipe can be used in a variety of tasty ways. Try peanut butter and peanuts in place of chocolate chips, or adding mini vegan marshmallows on top and broiling for a torched effect.

Get the recipe for Vegan Chocolate Cookies


In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer analyzed 19 studies on indoor tanning and the risk for melanoma. It concluded that people who started indoor tanning before age 35 had a 75% greater risk of developing melanoma. Since 2003, UV radiation from any source has been listed by the U.S. National Toxicology Program as a known carcinogen (cancer-causing substance). Currently, many government agencies caution against tanning.

In the past few years, the term “guilt-free comfort food” has been circulating on the internet and becoming prevalent in the marketing of food. Halo Top and the ilk advertise a guilt-free experience and Fitness magazine, The Daily Meal and Food Network have published roundup articles on guilt-free recipes. Many of these recipes substitute baked for fried, or they feature swaps like mac and cheese made with reduced-fat cheese or “ice cream” made with yogurt and vegan protein powder.

Here is the best possible review I can give: I make items for people from this book, and they have no idea it's low fat or low calorie or anything! They love it! Haha! I always wait until they are done eating and then I say.. You know that was only 200 calories. They are always shocked and amazed. I've read a few reviews that say that ..oh this book isn't special it only replaces items that are fattening with their low fat counterparts. I don't think that's true. It's how they are combined with other ingredients that helps them taste like the real thing. I know I have tried many a time to just substitute low fat ingredients for full fat ones, and then it doesn't taste anywhere near the real thing. Devin has a way of making all the ingredients combine so well that the end result is just perfect! I highly recommend this book.
×