What else? There is never ‘guilt’ as an ingredient. I promise. Go check the back of your favorite “guilty” food, it won’t be listed. When we label foods as ‘guilt free’ it makes it seem like we should feel guilt about foods that aren’t labeled guilt free. Yikes. What’s really happening is that the labeling of this product is using basic psychology and marketing principles to make you buy their product - but it’s also changing how you feelings and thoughts about food.
Hilda Solares holds a BA in Theology from the Latin University of Theology. She has worked in a variety of positions in education with close to 30 years of experience. Hilda also has an extensive ministry background with over 25 years of service. She is the founder of Fit To Serve Group, a church community group that combines the Christian faith with that of a low carb keto diet. The group was formed in 2014 and it’s where she and her husband Randy Solares teach the community how to combine Biblical principles with healthy eating habits for greater health and wellness. Hilda was awarded top 25 Christian Cooking and Food Blog by Feedspot, and recognized by WegoHealth for her inspiring writing. Her lifework aims to encourage people to be whole in spirit, mind, and body.
To serve: Soak the blade of a thin knife in a cup of very hot water until warm. Slide the knife around the sides of the pan to release the cake. Place a piece of wax paper on top of the cake. Invert a plate over the wax paper and invert the pan onto the plate. Remove the pan and peel away the paper liner. Place a serving plate over the cake and turn the cake right-side up again; remove the wax paper. Dip a sharp knife in hot water and wipe it dry before cutting each slice. Serve with Candied Orange Peel, if desired.
Some of the ingredients in real ice cream - like fat and milk - are what make ice cream creamy, smooth, and satisfying! Those are also the things that make you naturally stop eating ice cream when you do feel satisfied and are allowing yourself to enjoy it. When we restrict ourselves of certain foods, it makes the sensory reward of those foods increase. All these effects of food marketing and diet culture make it hard to believe that you aren’t just a bottomless pit who can’t control yourself around certain foods - but you aren’t. Eating foods - especially ones that you like and taste good - doesn’t make you guilty of anything.  
Research has found that the antioxidant capacity of cacao in comparison to green tea, black tea, and red wine has the greatest activity and most potential for health benefits. If you don’t know, antioxidants are those fabulous things that slow down those unwanted changes that come with aging, reduce the risk of cancer and help decrease the chances of heart disease. At only 108 calories a pop, feel free to have two or three of these eye-pleasing little bliss balls.
Oh....my.....GOSH!!! I loved this!!!! This was so delicious. Amazingly, delightfully, spoon-and-plate-lickingly good! No one will ever guess that it is reasonably healthy. Wow! It tastes like you bought it at a high-end pastry shop. If you or your guests are chocolate fans you HAVE TO make this!!!! It's one of the best things that I've ever made. A couple tips: if you can find them, bittersweet chocolate chips will make your life easier so you don't have to chop up the chocolate. Use good quality chocolate. Bittersweet isn't the same as semisweet. If you do use semisweet, you'll probably want to cut down on the sugar. I used Camino organic bittersweet chips and they were fantastic. If you want the cake to have the right height: 1. beat the heck out of the egg whites. They need to be STIFF. It will take several minutes. 2. Make sure to fold, not stir in the eggwhites. If you're not sure how to do either of these, just google it. I used a 9" pan and it rose to the top of the pan and looked just like the photo. The cake is VERY intense, rich and chocolaty. I cut it into 8 pieces but I think at that size it was almost too intense. I'd suggest that you stick to what the recipe says and cut into 12 pieces. The piece will be small but very satisfying. Then if anyone wants more, they can go ahead (One of my guests left about 1/4 of her piece and then threw it in the garbage. I wanted to cry!) I lined the bottom AND the sides with 2 pieces of parchment paper that hung over the sides
Well, buckle up, because these healthy desserts are about to take you on an unexpected, yet truly exciting ride. This means we’re not talking about chocolate covered strawberries—as tasty as they are. From potassium-packed chocolate banana bread muffins to “clean” cookie dough (that’s totally safe to eat raw), these amazing healthy desserts prove that healthy eating doesn’t have to mean salads without dressing. What’s more, making healthy choices can mean actually looking forward to what you eat.

Best served the day they're made, these bright and beautiful tarts are packed with a yummy maple and almond filling, and topped with a sweet orange-infused cranberry compote.

Get the recipe for Gluten-Free, Vegan Cranberry-Almond Tartlets


Inspired by the old-school, ultra-rich, mousselike chocolate cake that usually called for a whole pound of chocolate, half a dozen eggs and lots of butter, this enlightened rendition has deep bittersweet chocolate flavor and dense melt-in-your-mouth texture. No one will guess it's healthier. The secret is excellent natural cocoa powder and good-quality bittersweet chocolate, preferably with 70% cacao. Although the cake can be eaten once it's completely cool, it comes out of the pan much easier and even tastes better if it has been chilled at least overnight.

Oh. Wow. Never would I have thought that a Diet Soda + Cake Mix = a decadent, yet low fat CAKE! Consider my mind blown. Just by nixing the eggs and oil, you deduct many calories from the cake. But who would have thought that adding a can of my favorite diet soda to it instead of the eggs and oil would make such a divine, diet-friendly dessert! Not me!!!!! Gotta be honest. I was truly skeptical. I decided I would give it a go but not have high expectations. And honestly, it was really delicious!


The traditional tomato soup with a little spunk! Soup is not your conventional snack but as long as you remember portions were thinking this soup will change your mind. This low sugar soup combines potatoes, which are high in B6 and have a rich flavor, crunchy bacon, and white beans to make it a complete snack to warm your belly and satisfy your hunger until your next meal. Tomato soup alone comes packed with essential minerals and vitamins but with the addition of white beans you are also adding a source of protein.
I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.
Don't feel guilty if you need your daily chocolate fix. Dark chocolate that is 70 to 85 percent cacao offers around 90 calories per half-ounce serving. In 2011, Boston-based researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted a review of the benefits of dark chocolate. Published in the "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition," the study reported that consuming dark chocolate on a daily basis for two to 12 weeks improves blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol. This is the harmful cholesterol that hardens arteries and increases your risk of heart disease. Although dark chocolate can be beneficial for your heart, keep your serving size to a half-ounce to avoid consuming a high amount of calories.

If you’re looking for an alternative to cream and sugar-based ice creams, a can of coconut milk perked up with espresso beans is just the ticket. The healthy fats in coconut butter (similar to peanut butter, but made with coconut flakes instead of nuts) rounds things out.

Get the recipe for Vegan Vanilla Faux Ice Cream


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Baby carrots are a guilt-free food you can enjoy at your desk or while on the road. A 1-cup serving of raw baby carrots has a minimal 25 calories and about 3 grams of fiber to make you feel full. The orange color of carrots is due to beta-carotene, a vitamin A compound essential for vision health. Women need 2,333 international units of vitamin A compounds and men require 3,000 IU daily, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Carrots provide nearly 1,800 IU of vitamin A compounds in the form of beta-carotene per half-cup serving.

Important Disclaimer: The information contained on Happy Body Formula is intended for informational and educational purposes only. Any statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the FDA and any information or products discussed are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent any disease or illness. Please consult a healthcare practitioner before making changes to your diet or taking supplements that may interfere with medications.
For all you dip lovers out there, here’s your next favorite snack perfect for dipping fruit and veggies in! Swap the chocolate chips out for a more natural form, cacao nibs, and use plain greek yogurt instead for an added source of protein, a lower carb intake, and less sugar. Get your dippers ready because this treat is something you won’t stop coming back to!
Research has found that the antioxidant capacity of cacao in comparison to green tea, black tea, and red wine has the greatest activity and most potential for health benefits. If you don’t know, antioxidants are those fabulous things that slow down those unwanted changes that come with aging, reduce the risk of cancer and help decrease the chances of heart disease. At only 108 calories a pop, feel free to have two or three of these eye-pleasing little bliss balls.
Baby carrots are a guilt-free food you can enjoy at your desk or while on the road. A 1-cup serving of raw baby carrots has a minimal 25 calories and about 3 grams of fiber to make you feel full. The orange color of carrots is due to beta-carotene, a vitamin A compound essential for vision health. Women need 2,333 international units of vitamin A compounds and men require 3,000 IU daily, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Carrots provide nearly 1,800 IU of vitamin A compounds in the form of beta-carotene per half-cup serving.
I  just purchased Guilt-Free-Desserts, and to be very frank , I still have not tried all of the recipes myself yet. Just to let you know my first impression, I see that the ebook does  contain a lot of helpful information about guilt free baking, healthy sweeteners and healthy flours and a lot of desserts I am sure will taste awesome and be healthier than ever! The book is essentially a way for you to bake your favorite desserts and recipes while doing so in a way that is healthy and still tasty. It has all the information about the latest baking ingredients that can be used to boost your health and immune system and keep you looking slim.
Using the peanut paste, you can smear it on apples, bananas, or rice crackers. You can also replace the peanut butter in your favourite Thai noodle sauce with PB2, or use it in its powdered form in baked goods. If you go the baked goods route, make sure to swap out about ¼ of flour the recipe calls for since you’ll be adding extra powder with the PB2.
Don’t risk breaking your ketosis, and causing a backslide in your progress, just to try something new! Be sure to think carefully about what your Ketogenic Diet Goals are before making any changes. If you are not a high-intensity athlete, a body builder, have specific dietary restrictions, or are practicing the Keto Diet for medical reasons, oftentimes the best option for you is the SKD.

The Standard Ketogenic Diet Plan is the plan that you will learn the most about. When the “Keto Diet” is referenced, this is the plan being referenced. This diet plan consists of a 75% fat intake, 20% protein intake, and 5% carbohydrate intake. As with all diets, you should keep in mind that fat intake is different for everyone, so you can tweak it to your optimal consumption point.
This sandwich involves waffles, but it's more of a lunch than a breakfast thing. Want it for breakfast? No judgments. The idea is basically this: Take some greasy fried chicken and turn it into a sandwich by stuffing it between two slices of bacon-and-cheese-spiked waffles. Hard to get greasier than that. PS: This recipe calls for homemade waffles and home-fried chicken, but you can easily adapt it by using storebought frozen wafles and picking up some fried chicken from your favorite local source.
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