For those seeking something sweet without dunking into the decadence of chocolate, these energy balls are for you! What a fun and healthy way to enjoy the taste of homemade Snickerdoodle cookies! These delicious energy balls are loaded with oats, cashews, dates, vanilla and cinnamon to keep you enjoying the taste of homemade sweets, while treating your body right. What a classic, with a twist… well, technically a roll. Love the idea of energy balls? Check out our round-up of 4 Lip-Smacking Energy Balls for a Tastier Snack Time >
2. MELT the butter in a medium saucepan on medium heat. Stir in the sugars and reduce the heat to low. Heat the mixture (avoid simmering), stirring often, until the sugar is partially dissolved, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in the cocoa, vanilla and 1⁄2 tsp salt. Beat the eggs lightly in a small bowl. Add to the cocoa mixture, stirring until just combined. Add the flour and stir until just combined. Stir in the chopped walnuts.
If there are certain foods that you really love and don't want to miss — like those creamy mashed potatoes or the dessert that's just calling your name — then limit ordinary foods like corn or a dinner roll to save calories where you won't miss them. Keep in mind that this isn't your only chance to eat these favorites. You can have pumpkin pie in March if you want to.
What else? There is never ‘guilt’ as an ingredient. I promise. Go check the back of your favorite “guilty” food, it won’t be listed. When we label foods as ‘guilt free’ it makes it seem like we should feel guilt about foods that aren’t labeled guilt free. Yikes. What’s really happening is that the labeling of this product is using basic psychology and marketing principles to make you buy their product - but it’s also changing how you feelings and thoughts about food.
I’ve also worked for startups - food, beverage and grocery store - so have been involved in the crafting of actual products and their messaging as well as seeing how customers react to them. When I worked in a boutique grocery in downtown NYC some customers wouldn’t buy products UNLESS they had calorie labels on them - even if they were made fresh from a restaurant next door. Others, would pick up $70+ worth of trendy supplements, weekly, and admit to not knowing what they were but that they recognized the name from Goop. Then there are the health-ified foods - that have added ‘protein’ or ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt free’ written into the brand name to let us know they’re okay to have! Thanks, marketing!
This year, a French grocery chain created a video for Ad Week showing how customers were tricked into thinking popsicles and yogurts were different flavors based on their coloring alone. They were actually all the same flavor but red ones were guessed to be cherry or strawberry and orange ones were guessed to be apricot or orange - coloring can trick our brain into assuming taste! Similarly, when we are told that one food product is superior to another or no longer ‘off limits’ since it’s labeled ‘healthy’ or ‘guilt-free’ it can change our sensory experience with the food, making it taste better. Our positive assumptions about how healthy or good a food is for us, can also make us find it more palatable and enjoyable but if we were to step back and objectively compare them - we might not be so convinced. 

“Food is not morally good or bad,” said Alyssa Pike, a registered dietician and the nutrition communications coordinator for the International Food Information Council Foundation. “It’s only when you categorize it that way when feelings of shame or guilt become associated with certain foods. Once we stop labeling foods as good or bad, we can stop feeling guilty about them.”
Don’t get angry. If you become angry at yourself after eating more than planned, think about why. You know one or two “out-of-the-ordinary” meals won’t reverse all of your progress. If you let minor setbacks get to you, you could be getting into a dangerous mindset. If you try to restrict and lower your calories below what Noom has set for you, you are likely to binge later on. This binge-restrict pattern is very difficult to get out of once it’s become habit. The best thing you can do for yourself after overeating is to continue as planned. Don’t try to account for the extra food, and don’t be angry at yourself. Everyone slips up in dieting, even those who have done it countless times. Forgive yourself and move on.
It's not uncommon to be doing well on a diet but also think from time to time, "I would do anything for a giant slice of cake." Cravings for sugary, sweet, and all around indulgent desserts seem to spike and stick around whenever we've gotten used to a healthy routine, and that can feel especially true if you've decided to try the keto diet. Since the whole point of this regimen is to rely on healthy fats and oils to burn fat, plunging a fork into a dessert seems strictly off limits.
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I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.

Well, buckle up, because these healthy desserts are about to take you on an unexpected, yet truly exciting ride. This means we’re not talking about chocolate covered strawberries—as tasty as they are. From potassium-packed chocolate banana bread muffins to “clean” cookie dough (that’s totally safe to eat raw), these amazing healthy desserts prove that healthy eating doesn’t have to mean salads without dressing. What’s more, making healthy choices can mean actually looking forward to what you eat.
For all you dip lovers out there, here’s your next favorite snack perfect for dipping fruit and veggies in! Swap the chocolate chips out for a more natural form, cacao nibs, and use plain greek yogurt instead for an added source of protein, a lower carb intake, and less sugar. Get your dippers ready because this treat is something you won’t stop coming back to!
Oh....my.....GOSH!!! I loved this!!!! This was so delicious. Amazingly, delightfully, spoon-and-plate-lickingly good! No one will ever guess that it is reasonably healthy. Wow! It tastes like you bought it at a high-end pastry shop. If you or your guests are chocolate fans you HAVE TO make this!!!! It's one of the best things that I've ever made. A couple tips: if you can find them, bittersweet chocolate chips will make your life easier so you don't have to chop up the chocolate. Use good quality chocolate. Bittersweet isn't the same as semisweet. If you do use semisweet, you'll probably want to cut down on the sugar. I used Camino organic bittersweet chips and they were fantastic. If you want the cake to have the right height: 1. beat the heck out of the egg whites. They need to be STIFF. It will take several minutes. 2. Make sure to fold, not stir in the eggwhites. If you're not sure how to do either of these, just google it. I used a 9" pan and it rose to the top of the pan and looked just like the photo. The cake is VERY intense, rich and chocolaty. I cut it into 8 pieces but I think at that size it was almost too intense. I'd suggest that you stick to what the recipe says and cut into 12 pieces. The piece will be small but very satisfying. Then if anyone wants more, they can go ahead (One of my guests left about 1/4 of her piece and then threw it in the garbage. I wanted to cry!) I lined the bottom AND the sides with 2 pieces of parchment paper that hung over the sides

These crunchy cookie bars are packed with dried cranberries and creamy chunks of sweet white chocolate. Coat them in a citrusy orange yogurt glaze and sprinkle with chopped cranberries for added texture and sweetness.

Get the recipe for White Chocolate Cranberry Cookie Bars


This is one of my go-to guilt-free desserts. It is easy, perfect for the warmer months when those ice cream cravings kick in, and it only requires a handful of ingredients. Banana ice cream has also gained some serious popularity after people started to realize just how delicious it can be and how whipped bananas closely resemble soft serve ice cream.

These crunchy cookie bars are packed with dried cranberries and creamy chunks of sweet white chocolate. Coat them in a citrusy orange yogurt glaze and sprinkle with chopped cranberries for added texture and sweetness.

Get the recipe for White Chocolate Cranberry Cookie Bars


No oven? No problem! This berry tasty treats go into the freezer where the cashew, strawberry and coconut oil filling will solidify into a cool and creamy treat.

Get the recipe for Vegan Strawberry Cheesecake Bites


Well, buckle up, because these healthy desserts are about to take you on an unexpected, yet truly exciting ride. This means we’re not talking about chocolate covered strawberries—as tasty as they are. From potassium-packed chocolate banana bread muffins to “clean” cookie dough (that’s totally safe to eat raw), these amazing healthy desserts prove that healthy eating doesn’t have to mean salads without dressing. What’s more, making healthy choices can mean actually looking forward to what you eat.
If you have any doubt about whether or not the content of program is actually useful for you, and if you really want to get a concrete and strong guarantee mechanism for your purchase, you should not miss this section of the Guilt Free Desserts review but read it carefully. Now, for just a very low price (as you can see in the cost section above), you will no longer have to worry about how to keep fit while still enjoying sweet and tasty desserts because the healthy effect of the dessert recipes that Kelley Herring promises is actually proven by a lot of customers all over the world. So, go straight ahead and enjoy the tasty and healthy dessert recipes and the precious knowledge that this cookbook provides. If you are not happy for any reason, just let the producer know within 60 days, and they will give you a prompt refund without any question asked. 

Thick Icelandic yogurt, skyr, is made into a creamy no-bake cheesecake that’s naturally high in protein and calcium, and is also gluten-free with a nut and date crust. This recipe is free of refined sugar, using maple syrup to sweeten everything up instead. Blueberries add drama and big flavour to this impressive dessert.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Blueberry Skyr Cheesecake


Research has found that the antioxidant capacity of cacao in comparison to green tea, black tea, and red wine has the greatest activity and most potential for health benefits. If you don’t know, antioxidants are those fabulous things that slow down those unwanted changes that come with aging, reduce the risk of cancer and help decrease the chances of heart disease. At only 108 calories a pop, feel free to have two or three of these eye-pleasing little bliss balls.
Why would you have plain old sweet-potato fries when you can wrap them in bacon? This recipe calls for just two ingredients: sweet potatoes and bacon. The only trick is twirling the bacon around the sweet potato fries, but it's pretty darn easy. What you end up with is a surprisingly attractive party hors d'oeuvre (if you don't devour them all yourself, of course).  
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