Great, super rich,vven taking short cuts with recipe! We loved this cake. I took a couple of shortcuts and it still came out great. First, I made this in a cheesecake springform pan without the water bath around it ( these pans would leak) so it would be easier to get out of the pan without inverting. Baked fine without the water bath around it and came out of pan. Secondly, I did not do the sugar, flour mixture in a pan as I thought I might burn it. I melted the chocolate in a double boiler and added the sugar and milk right to it in the double boiler. Thirdly, I did not make the topping but thought I might serve it with thaws frozen raspberries. S all in all, I made the recipe easier and it was rich and delicious. Pros: Delicious Cons: None

It's easy to make room after a large meal for this light and airy mousse. Made with creamy avocado, ripe banana, coconut milk and cacao with a hint of maple syrup. Top with jewels of pomegranate or fresh berries before serving.

Get the recipe for Raw Vegan Chocolate Avocado Mousse with Pomegranates


I like how it also delves into using ingredients that are rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants protect us from aging helping our skin to stay youthful and radiant. Cocoa powder is one recommendation as it has a whopping ORAC score of 80,933 – about 14 times higher than blueberries. My all time favorite though is Clove oil where 1 drop is equal to about 400 cups of blueberries!
I just read through this whole exchange and I understand both (all three, rather) sides of the point. As someone who has trudged my way through binge eating disorder-turned-bulemia-turned binge again, a few short years ago, my goal was reduced to the smallest nutshell of wanting freedom with food–not freedom from it. I have been through layer after layer of motives, belief systems regarding food and exercise, victory and despair. I currently find myself in a place of peace. On the way, I was the person who could not forgive herself for her poor decisions, learning the hard way that my unforgiveness only compounded those choices and led to further destructive behavior. I think folks who identify with that mindset are the author’s intended audience. As far as Mandy’s point about tough love, I had many points at which I would have given many things to have had someone in my life offer some accountability. If I got it, I certainly did not recognize it. I married a beautiful man who had no grid for my struggles. He wrestled competitively for most of his life, a crazy high metabolism and no problems with eating whatever he wanted. His weight has not fluctuated more than 5 pounds in the 11 years I’ve known him and he has no ailments outside of a bum knee from an old injury. He does not go work out and never thinks twice about what he eats despite having a sizeable sweet tooth. His version of tough love was to tell me to put up with the trigger foods because my choices were my own. I had to climb a steep mountain to keep foods in the house that I considered triggers. There is a great chance that I would be much slimmer now if I had been feeding only myself and had total jurisdiction over the pantry’s contents. However, if not for that scenario, I may not have been nudged into deeper freedom. I found myself with an opportunity to take advantage of a rigorous situation: how do I get myself to make good choices in an environment over which I did not have total control? I learned that there is an idealism in me which is strong enough to override impulses and bad habits. I don’t even know how to articulate what it was, but the notion was implemented with the question, “would I be happier if I did eat “x” or if I did not eat “x?” Sometimes the answer has been yes, sometimes it’s been no. I had to repeatedly search deep within myself to discover what is really important to me. Asking myself this question turned a new page in my life. It isn’t my focal point anymore, but from time to time I find myself asking it again. I transitioned into a different stage where my internal dialog became “You are a grown-a!$ woman and can make a decision you’re willing to stand by,” haha. This question has not been limited to regarding my food choices, either. I have had to find my own unorthodox inspiration to pursue joy in my life. Along these lines, I learned some other things about myself. It turns out movement, not merely exercise, is something I cherish, so I make it a priority in my day. I discovered that the only reason I was so concerned with my body image was because other people made it their business to criticize me (I went through a season of heavy criticism at a sensitive age. Not all had to do with my body, but much of it did). Once I moved past being so self-conscious, I didn’t mind being a little chubby. In fact, I like my curves and they do not get in my way! Something I never expected began to occur as soon as my attitude settled into contentment. Every couple of weeks I think to weigh myself. And you know what? I am a few ounces less each time! I know that this rate of progress is not for everybody, but for me it is golden. It simply confirms that if in my mind I am free, the rest really does take care of itself. My greatest motivator is, has been and will always be joy. It doesn’t matter if there are chips, kale, cookies or quinoa in the kitchen; what matters is that neither healthy nor unhealthy food control me. Also, I have learned that it is wise to be okay whether or not those around me are.

Then we have a box of Cheetos and glass of soda. The glass of soda is a bunch of chemicals and pure sugar that has no nutrients. Just caloric energy (calories). The Cheetos are made from chemicals and wheat that has been stripped of its nutrients and processed down to flour. This process makes these foods more calorie dense and easier to consume more of.

Best served the day they're made, these bright and beautiful tarts are packed with a yummy maple and almond filling, and topped with a sweet orange-infused cranberry compote.

Get the recipe for Gluten-Free, Vegan Cranberry-Almond Tartlets


Thick Icelandic yogurt, skyr, is made into a creamy no-bake cheesecake that’s naturally high in protein and calcium, and is also gluten-free with a nut and date crust. This recipe is free of refined sugar, using maple syrup to sweeten everything up instead. Blueberries add drama and big flavour to this impressive dessert.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Blueberry Skyr Cheesecake


Too often we are focused on calories, fat, carbs and protein and we aren’t eating food for its vitamin, mineral and phytochemical content. Eating whole foods, including healthy fats and protein, help to keep us feeling satiated, balance our energy and mood and keep carb cravings down, all of which aid in maintaining or achieving a healthy weight. So, not only does a diet full of whole foods alleviate food guilt, it also eliminates the need to count calories.
Don’t risk breaking your ketosis, and causing a backslide in your progress, just to try something new! Be sure to think carefully about what your Ketogenic Diet Goals are before making any changes. If you are not a high-intensity athlete, a body builder, have specific dietary restrictions, or are practicing the Keto Diet for medical reasons, oftentimes the best option for you is the SKD.

Coated in cinnamon-sugar and finished with melted dark or white chocolate, these delicious churro-style doughnuts — hold the deep fryer — can be made in under an hour, and are the perfect party snack. Swap regular chocolate for a dairy-free variety to make this fully vegan.

Get the recipe for Vegan Churro Doughnuts


Don't feel guilty if you need your daily chocolate fix. Dark chocolate that is 70 to 85 percent cacao offers around 90 calories per half-ounce serving. In 2011, Boston-based researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted a review of the benefits of dark chocolate. Published in the "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition," the study reported that consuming dark chocolate on a daily basis for two to 12 weeks improves blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol. This is the harmful cholesterol that hardens arteries and increases your risk of heart disease. Although dark chocolate can be beneficial for your heart, keep your serving size to a half-ounce to avoid consuming a high amount of calories.

You don’t need eggs and butter to make this homey classic. Featuring ingredients like spelt flour, flax and chocolate chips, it’s a suitable (and super tasty!) breakfast option.

Get the recipe for Vegan Chocolate Chip Banana Bread


Before you start singing T. Swift’s “Bad Blood” to your favorite foods that might not be doing any favors for your waistline, why not try these slimming swaps instead? Peanut butter, chocolate, and bacon are all very different choices for what you love to indulge in, but they’re also three of the most popular cravings in America. So keep that mad love going—without the belly fat—with these easy ideas. We’ve sorted them by category, so look for your favorites (no judgments if it’s a three-way tie for the #1 spot in your heart) and then check out these 9 Foods That Shut Off Your Hunger Hormones—Fast!
Dinners; Chinese pepper steak, was delicious. Smashed potatoes were very good. Grilled corn was yummy. Deserts, I've had the Not only in your dreams cake. Sooooo gooood! I'm planning on making the Carrot cake soon! I honestly can't say enough good things about this book. It's been great for me and so far my husband has loved everything. I have to sometimes make a few more servings so he can take them to work the next day! The recipes have been fairly easy to double up or even reduce.
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