Glutathione is an antioxidant concentrated in the liver that helps bind toxins and escort them out of the body via urine or bile. Glutathione may also boost the absorption of various nutrients in the foods you eat. Glutathione can be obtained directly from a few foods, including raw spinach, avocado, and asparagus; and it can also be produced by your body from the amino acids glutamine, glycine, and cysteine. Foods containing the building blocks of glutathione include bone broth and sulfur-containing foods such as cruciferous veggies and garlic. Getting enough vitamin C, vitamin D, and minerals like zinc and selenium are also important for glutathione production.
“Prunes help maintain good digestive health and can positively affect the bacteria living in the gut, potentially reducing the risk of colon cancer. And pulses (which include lentils, beans, chickpeas and peas) can improve gut health by strengthening the gut barrier and reducing the risk of gut-associated diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Pears contain prebioitic fiber that helps promote intestinal health by providing food for beneficial probiotic bacteria.” The point is, you need a variety of fiber sources to optimize your gut health so make sure to include these foods, as well as others rich in fiber (such as whole grains and an array of fruits and veggies), often.
During the Jacksonian era and out of the second great awakening a crusade against "Demon rum" and other spirits ensued in states east of the Mississippi River and north of the Mason–Dixon line. This resulted in statewide prohibition of alcohol in this region beginning in the state of Maine in 1851. However, rampant smuggling across the Ohio River and down from Canada soon ended these state laws as they were unenforceable. Various ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities such as Irish immigrants and Roman Catholics were held up as moral examples during the period, thought to be responsible for both excessive drinking and the spread of diseases such as cholera.
In this week’s issue, we dig into the latest shareholder letter from Warren Buffett, examine the growing number of dividend cuts and other factors make the year to date melt up in the stock market something of a head-scratcher. That best performance in 20+ years hinges on a successful trade deal with China, but there are other factors that we need to examine so we don’t fall prey to a “buy the rumor, sell the news” scenario. We recap the sharp move in Universal Display shares following its latest earnings report and touch on favorable news emanating from Mobile World Congress 2019 for Nokia.

Dark leafy greens such as dandelion greens, arugula, spinach, and kale (and even algaes like chlorella) contain plant chlorophylls, which help remove chemicals, pesticides, and heavy metals from the bloodstream. Specifically, early research shows that chlorophyll may reduce the risk of liver damage caused by aflatoxins (dangerous compounds produced by fungi that may be present on a variety of foods, including peanuts) by increasing the activity of certain enzymes and removing toxins.

Dark leafy greens such as dandelion greens, arugula, spinach, and kale (and even algaes like chlorella) contain plant chlorophylls, which help remove chemicals, pesticides, and heavy metals from the bloodstream. Specifically, early research shows that chlorophyll may reduce the risk of liver damage caused by aflatoxins (dangerous compounds produced by fungi that may be present on a variety of foods, including peanuts) by increasing the activity of certain enzymes and removing toxins.
Eating clean may sound like an “out there” buzz term, but the basic principles behind this movement are founded on sound nutrition. Once you get used to it, cooking and eating clean recipes is a snap, even during busy weeknights. To make life easier, plan your menu ahead of time and keep your pantry stocked with healthy “clean” foods. All of these “clean” dishes come together in less than an hour and all of them use simple ingredients most people have on hand or can be quickly picked up at the grocery store. For those strictly following a clean-eating diet, these Cooking Light recipes fit the bill. For those who are just interested in what “clean eating” is all about, see how easy (and delicious) it can be.
As part of our Clean Living investment theme, we’ve seen case volumes of not only sugary beverages but also those laced with artificial sweeteners come under pressure as consumers shift to healthier alternatives, including a variety of waters both still and sparkling. Existing soda giants, such as Coca-Cola have been expanding their beverage offering in […]
I’ve been keeping a close watch on the shares of Chipotle Mexican Grill (CMG. The company was previously part of what we now refer to as our Clean Living investment theme given its use of fresh, high-quality raw ingredients including meats that are raised without the use of non-therapeutic antibiotics or added hormones and none of the ingredients in the food (excluding beverages) in U.S. restaurants contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs). 
The Clean Living movement has become pervasive across restaurant menus in recent years. According to the Natural Restaurant Association, in 2016 it was reported that more than 8 in 10 of their guests paid more attention to the nutrition content of food when compared to two years prior. We see restaurateurs responding with more farm-to-table menus and overhauls of recipes in favor of made-from-scratch and organic ingredients.

As health concerns arise with the chemicals in cleaning and household products, more natural, fragrance-free cleaning products have moved into the mainstream. Also, products that have high recycling content and environmentally friendly processes have gained favor, as well as clean energy products in the vein of solar, wind, LED lighting and electric vehicles. Other areas include low VOC furniture, mattresses, paint and flooring.
Cycles of social reforms have been observed in religion, politics, the economy and other areas of human endeavor. Reforms to clean up society in regard to issues related to health also appear to come in cycles. Reform campaigns during Clean Living Movements include temperance (anti-alcohol), social purity (sexuality), diet, physical exercise, eugenics (heredity), public health, and anti-tobacco and drug campaigns. Interest in these issues rise and fall more or less simultaneously and often follow a religious awakening in which both evangelical sentiments and the development of new sects emerge. The movements also coincide with episodes of xenophobia or moral panic in which various minorities are targeted as undesirable influences for medical or moral reasons.

As health concerns arise with the chemicals in cleaning and household products, more natural, fragrance-free cleaning products have moved into the mainstream. Also, products that have high recycling content and environmentally friendly processes have gained favor, as well as clean energy products in the vein of solar, wind, LED lighting and electric vehicles. Other areas include low VOC furniture, mattresses, paint and flooring.
Proponents of detox diets often recommend cleansing several times a year to improve your health and prevent disease. When repeating your detox, try integrating different eating patterns and actions than you did on your last diet. Testing out new wellness strategies during your seven-day detox diet can give you powerful clues on how to achieve optimal health all year round.
^ Compare: Wanjek, Christopher (8 August 2006). "Colon Cleansing: Money Down the Toilet". LiveScience. Retrieved 10 November 2008. Colon cleansing refers to a more invasive procedure of water and hoses stuck you-know-where. It's not clear when this practice started. [...] The golden age of the colon in America was in the late 19th century when—perhaps influenced by a new emphasis on hygiene and proper sewage removal—serious-minded doctors developed the theory of colonic autointoxication. [...] The idea was that the intestines were a sewage system and that constipation, although never specifically defined, resulted in a cesspool within the body where food wastes would putrefy, become toxic, and get reabsorbed through the intestines. Some scientists also claimed that constipation caused fecal matter to harden onto the intestinal walls for months or years, blocking the absorption of nutrients (yet somehow not blocking toxins). [...] The beginning of the end of the (first) era of autointoxication came with a 1919 article in Journal of the American Medical Association by W.C. Alvarez, 'Origin of the so-called auto-intoxication symptom.' Soon after, and still to this day, direct observations of the colon through surgery and autopsy find no hardening of fecal matter along the intestinal walls. There's no cesspool either. Cesspools form from copious amounts of feces from entire neighborhoods, which is why crowded cities with inadequate sewage systems smelled so awful and why autointoxication made sense. [...] By the 1920s, colon cleansing was relegated to the realm of quackery.
Side effects often experienced while on a detox diet include feeling tired, headaches, light-headedness and nausea. These symptoms are often usually caused by a lack of food as detox diets are often low in calories. This lack of food can lead to cravings for high sugar and high fat foods, which can knock you off your diet and do a lot of damage in a short space of time

Endotoxins include compounds such as lactic acid, urea and waste products from microbes in the gut. Exotoxins include environmental toxins and pollutants, pesticides, mercury in seafood, lead from car exhaust and air pollution, chemicals in tobacco smoke, dioxin in feminine care products, phthalates from plastic and parabens from lotions and cosmetics.
An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

When it comes down to it, clean living is a lifestyle focused on leading a healthy and natural life – and a healthy life is the first step toward a happy life. Skip the bad and risky stuff, and stick to the stuff you know is good. Avoid chemicals and artificial or synthetic things, and go for what’s real. Your body is your home, so take care of it! It’s the only one you get.
×