Why she cleansed When her Bikram yoga instructor began touting detox diets, VandeKerkhof was pregnant with her first child, and the idea resonated. "I started to think a lot about toxins," she tells SELF. "Everything you eat transfers to your baby." After weaning her second child, she was bloated, tired, and anxious, and she finally gave the trend a try, spending $300 for a 28-day Arise & Shine colon-cleanse program. "For three weeks, you eat only raw foods, then for one week you have only juice or water," she says.
Endotoxins include compounds such as lactic acid, urea and waste products from microbes in the gut. Exotoxins include environmental toxins and pollutants, pesticides, mercury in seafood, lead from car exhaust and air pollution, chemicals in tobacco smoke, dioxin in feminine care products, phthalates from plastic and parabens from lotions and cosmetics.
Certain devices are promoted to allegedly remove toxins from the body. One version involves a foot-bath using a mild electric current, while another involves small adhesive pads applied to the skin (usually the foot). In both cases, the production of an alleged brown "toxin" appears after a brief delay. In the case of the foot bath, the "toxin" is actually small amounts of rusted iron leaching from the electrodes.[17] The adhesive pads change color due to oxidation of the pads' ingredients in response to the skin's moisture. In both cases, the same color-changes occur irrespective of whether the water or patch even make contact with the skin (they merely require water—thus proving the color-change does not result from any body-detoxification process).[15]
From reducing salt and fats from its snack business to the introduction of Bulby, its own line of flavored seltzer waters, PepsiCo continues to transform its business in line with shifting consumer preferences that are reflected in our Clean Living investing theme. With the acquisition of SodaStream, Pepsico takes several steps forward as it not only […]
Detoxification (often shortened to detox and sometimes called body cleansing) is a type of alternative medicine treatment which aims to rid the body of unspecified "toxins" – substances that proponents claim have accumulated in the body and have undesirable short-term or long-term effects on individual health. Activities commonly associated with detoxification include dieting, fasting, consuming exclusively or avoiding specific foods (such as fats, carbohydrates, fruits, vegetables, juices, herbs, or water), colon cleansing, chelation therapy, and the removal of dental fillings containing amalgam.
Colon cleansing involves giving an enema (colonic) containing some salt, and sometimes coffee or herbs to remove food that, according to proponents,[citation needed] remains in the colon, producing nonspecific symptoms and general ill-health. However, the colon usually does not require any help cleaning itself.[citation needed] The practice can be potentially dangerous if incorrectly practised.[15]
The 3-Day Detox Diet. Don't have 2-weeks for a full detox? This 3-day detox is my own plan. It's easy, it's simple and there are no fancy foods required. In fact, it follows guidelines developed by the USDA's MyPlate nutritional program. This is the plan that I use when I need to reset my taste buds after a busy party season or a vacation full of indulgent foods.
Bone broth, a liquid made from the water left over after simmering bones for up to a day at a time, has been associated with a number of incredible benefits. Perhaps most impressive, however, is its potent effects on detoxification. Studies suggest that bone broth may help improve immune health by reducing inflammation, allowing your body to work more effectively at removing harmful toxins, bacteria and pathogens from the body. (10) Because it’s rich in collagen and an assortment of amino acids, it’s also believed to help seal the gut and protect against leaky gut syndrome, a condition that allows toxins and particles to seep from the gut into the bloodstream.
Brigitte Zeitlin, M.P.H., R.D., C.D.N., founder of the New York-based BZ Nutrition, tells SELF, "Eating regularly throughout the day keeps your metabolism running at full speed, prevents dips in your energy, keeps you alert and focused, and [can help keep] your weight steady by preventing overeating at later meals." She and other experts recommend eating every three to four hours. If you don't, there are a number of unpleasant symptoms you may encounter.

Sesame shrimp is usually a dish that’s been fried and coated in a sticky-sweet sauce. Here we incorporate sesame seeds into a light, supercrisp panko coating. Brown sugar and Sriracha go into the egg white used in the breading—a brilliant way to achieve big flavor in little time and with less added sugar. We love a bit of crisp-tender stem with the broccoli, though you can save on prep by using two (12-ounce) packages of fresh broccoli florets instead.
Her new eating plan Instead of detoxing to get more produce, Kelly needed to consume more whole fruit and vegetables as part of a balanced diet, Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D.N., in Chicago, tells SELF. "Dawn taught me ways to work them in, like adding lots of zucchini to pasta sauce," Kelly says. Kelly planned for treats, such as a small cup of ice cream, that she could enjoy without overdoing it. And she cut back on takeout by cooking big meals and saving half for later.
Detoxification is a process that the body performs around the clock utilizing important nutrients from the diet. It's the process that transforms molecules that need to be removed from the body, or "toxins." They fall into two main categories: molecules that are made in the body as byproducts of regular metabolism (endotoxins), and those that come from outside the body and are introduced to the system by eating, drinking, breathing or are absorbed through the skin (exotoxins).
Not all the nutrients and other substances that contribute to good health have been identified, so eating a wide assortment of healthy whole foods like fruits and vegetables helps ensure that you get all of the health-promoting benefits that foods can offer. If your diet, day after day, consists of the same half dozen foods, it could fall short. In addition, varying your food choices will limit your exposure to any pesticides or toxic substances that might be present in particular foods. 
During this era a focus on exercise, non-use of tobacco, and the elimination of coffee, tea, sugar, meat and spice from a diet, called "Grahamism," – named after reformer Sylvester Graham – was promoted. Eugenic or "hereditarian" concerns that masturbation would lead to insanity and that choosing sick or feeble spouses would lead to further degeneration was discussed. Out of this era Phrenology – the study of shapes and bumps on the head – used to select a healthy marriage partner was popular. New religions that promoted "pure" lifestyles such as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Seventh-day Adventists emerged.

That means one drink a day for women, two a day for men. People over 65 should drink even less. A drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1½ ounces of 80-proof spirits. While alcohol has potential heart benefits, it poses a variety of health risks, especially in excess amounts. And some people shouldn't drink at all, including pregnant women and those taking medications that interact with alcohol. People with liver disease, high trigylcerides, sleep apnea, and certain other conditions should ask their doctors about the advisability of drinking.
Why she cleansed "I was looking for focus," Kelly, who was traveling for work, studying for the bar, buying a home, and moving, tells SELF. She often ate meals out with friends and reached for Twix bars and fries on the road. Kelly's real estate agent suggested her frazzled client try the cleanse outlined in her favorite book, which called for days of only fruit followed by days of vegetable juices. "I needed energy, so I was willing to go along with the potential craziness."
"The front is all advertising," says Michelle K. Berman, R.D., of Fairfax, Virginia. Flip it around for the real story. The more ingredients, the more likely it has visited a few processing plants where something artificial was mixed in, says Lydia Zepeda, Ph.D., professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Plus, checking the label is a great way to find out if there are unnecessary ingredients in something seemingly healthy. Because, no, bread does not need added sugar.
Count carbohydrates – “ Carbs” are found in all kinds of foods, including breads, pastas, fruits, dairy products and sugary foods such as desserts. “Complex” carbohydrates, such as whole grain bread, provide more nutrition than others. Sweets such as cake aren’t as good for you as whole grains and vegetables, and often are high in fat and calories. That’s why it’s better to save them for a treat.
“When I need to give my diet a reboot, I focus on having two nourishing, planned snacks per day, like a pear and pecans, or grape tomatoes and string cheese, or berries and yogurt. And I put the snacks on a plate, sit down and enjoy them.” This part is especially key. When you graze or snack mindlessly, you don’t register those foods as well as when you plate them. No plate? No problem! Use a paper towel, napkin, cup or whatever is available to you to help you eat more mindfully.
At this point, you have a great base diet full of nourishing whole foods. But now it’s time to get more strategic and add in specific foods that have been shown to improve digestion, heal the gut (since a leaky gut can allow unwanted toxins into the bloodstream), and support the liver or assist your body’s detoxification processes in other ways. These 12 are a great place to start:
These ruby-hued roots contain a type of antioxidant called betalains, which may help reduce chronic inflammation and repair cells in the liver thanks to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Beets also boast high amounts of dietary nitrates, which expand blood vessels and improve blood flow, and thus lower blood pressure. Consider blending your beets with a peeled orange, splash of seltzer, and some ice for a refreshing treat.

Dawn Jackson Blatner, RDN, author of "The Superfood Swap," offers this tip: Swap grazing for plated snacks. “I have a tendency to graze mindlessly, and even if it’s on healthy stuff, it adds up,” she says. “Grabbing a spoonful of ‘this’ while standing in the kitchen, scooping a handful of ‘that’ while working at my desk, or eating just a few little bites of ‘something’ while watching TV.” Anyone else familiar with this scenario?


In between meals, go ahead and have a snack. "When you go too long in between meals without eating, it is difficult to go into your next meal in control and avoid overeating,” Julia Levine Axelbaum, R.D., L.D., Bariatric Dietitian at NewStart Clinic, tells SELF. Of course, you'll want to be thoughtful about the kind of snacks you opt for. She explains that those that are high in protein, fiber, and complex carbohydrates will give you the energy you need to get through the day and keep you satiated from one meal to the next. On the other hand, those that are high in refined carbs and sugar will give you a sudden blood sugar spike that will eventually cause you to crash and feel even more tired.


The Clean Living Movement around the turn of the twenty-first century was characterized by many crusades and counter crusades. Activities that surged in the earlier years of the era were often met with counter-movements about ten years later. For example, "women’s liberation" was countered by a "pro-family" movement; the use of marijuana and other drugs was followed by a "war on drugs"; lowering of the drinking age was followed by a raising of the drinking age; non-marital sexual activity was challenged by a new "purity" movement; and legal rights to obtaining abortions ("pro-choice") were met with agitation against abortion ("pro-life").

Eat like a tourist in Greece. The sunset over your office park isn't as stunning as the one over an Aegean beach, but a plate of grilled fish and fresh vegetables and a glass of wine is as delicious in Athens, Georgia, as it is in Athens, Greece. All the heart-healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants in Mediterranean foods like hummus, olive oil, and feta can help lower your risk for heart disease, says Susan Mitchell, Ph.D., coauthor of Fat Is Not Your Fate (Fireside).
Dawn Jackson Blatner, RDN, author of "The Superfood Swap," offers this tip: Swap grazing for plated snacks. “I have a tendency to graze mindlessly, and even if it’s on healthy stuff, it adds up,” she says. “Grabbing a spoonful of ‘this’ while standing in the kitchen, scooping a handful of ‘that’ while working at my desk, or eating just a few little bites of ‘something’ while watching TV.” Anyone else familiar with this scenario?

This is the one cleanse I can get behind! You’ve probably seen news reports that social media can heighten feelings of isolation and anxiety, but it can also increase feelings of body dissatisfaction. If certain accounts make you feel down about your body, your weight or the way you eat, it might be worth using the handy “unfollow” tool. Ditto for any accounts that recommend overly restrictive eating behaviors. There are healthy ways to lose weight that honor and respect your body so rid yourself of all the social noise that might be toxic to your overall wellbeing.


"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
Detoxification is a process that the body performs around the clock utilizing important nutrients from the diet. It's the process that transforms molecules that need to be removed from the body, or "toxins." They fall into two main categories: molecules that are made in the body as byproducts of regular metabolism (endotoxins), and those that come from outside the body and are introduced to the system by eating, drinking, breathing or are absorbed through the skin (exotoxins).
Detox diets can involve consuming extremely limited sets of foods (only water or juice, for example, a form of fasting[12] known as juice fasting), eliminating certain foods (such as fats) from the diet, or eliminating processed foods and alleged irritants.[13][unreliable source?] Detox diets are often high in fiber. Proponents claim that this causes the body to burn accumulated stored fats, releasing fat-stored "toxins" into the blood, which can then be eliminated through the blood, skin, urine, feces and breath. Proponents claim that things such as an altered body-odor support the notion that detox diets have an effect. The mainstream medical view is that the body has mechanisms to rid itself of toxins, and a healthy diet is best for the body.[14] Although a brief fast of a single day is unlikely to cause harm, prolonged fasting (as recommended by certain detox diets) can have dangerous health consequences or can even be fatal.[15][16]

Count carbohydrates – “ Carbs” are found in all kinds of foods, including breads, pastas, fruits, dairy products and sugary foods such as desserts. “Complex” carbohydrates, such as whole grain bread, provide more nutrition than others. Sweets such as cake aren’t as good for you as whole grains and vegetables, and often are high in fat and calories. That’s why it’s better to save them for a treat.

Fasting indeed has a long-standing spiritual tradition. "Almost every religion has some type of fasting ritual -- Lent, Ramadan, Yom Kippur ... the Hindus and Buddhists fast, too," says James Dillard, MD, assistant clinical professor at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. He's author of Alternative Medicinefor Dummies.

As health concerns arise with the chemicals in cleaning and household products, more natural, fragrance-free cleaning products have moved into the mainstream. Also, products that have high recycling content and environmentally friendly processes have gained favor, as well as clean energy products in the vein of solar, wind, LED lighting and electric vehicles. Other areas include low VOC furniture, mattresses, paint and flooring.
Toxic overload is an often-overlooked factor in obesity, and the right detoxification plan can provide the nutrients your body requires to help you heal and lose weight. While these strategies are a powerfully effective starting point, a chiropractor or other healthcare professional can help you design a custom-tailored detoxification plan based on your individual needs.

Hearty, flavorful and full of fiber, Brussels sprouts make an awesome addition to a healthy detox diet. Not only can they promote regularity to get things moving, but Brussels sprouts have also been shown to boost liver health and enhance detoxification. In fact, one study published in Carcinogenesis showed that eating just 300 grams of Brussels sprouts daily was able to amp up the levels of detox enzymes by a whopping 30 percent. (2)
Traditional Irish lamb stew is made with inexpensive shoulder or neck cuts of lamb, but for possibly the best Irish stew you'll ever make, give this version made with leg of lamb a try. Choose a bone-in cut to make the rich, flavorful broth for this healthy lamb stew. Requiring just a handful of ingredients and 35 minutes of active time, this lamb stew isn't just tasty--it's also easy!
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
We are seeing yet another shift in consumer products at the intersection of our Clean Living and Disruptive Innovators investing themes wherein the world’s biggest consumer brands are looking to provide their products to consumers in refillable containers so as to reduce waste. This creates a tailwind behind those providing the containers and the refilling […]

And Ian K. Smith, M.D. agrees. Dr. Ian is a Harvard graduate, founder of the SHRED Lifestyle, and the author several best-selling diet books. He explains that the liver, kidney, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal system remove toxins that accumulate in the body. But following a detox diet full of natural foods can enhance the body's ability to cleanse. He adds, however, that dieters should make no assumptions about health when choosing a detox diet. "Detoxes have gotten very trendy, and many of them are unhealthy and quite dangerous."
"Resolving to never eat a sweet again takes a lot of effort and can create a feeling of deprivation," Patricia Bannan, M.S., R.D.N., author of Eat Right When The Time Is Right, tells SELF. "A more realistic resolution would be to create an environment in which you can consume fewer sweets without having to rely solely on your willpower." If all you have to do is walk to your pantry, you'll grab a bag and attack it. But let's say you must put on your shoes, find your keys and drive to the store. Laziness will triumph. (Yes, sometimes sloth is a good thing!)

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Your tip When you detox, you define eating as unhealthy and starvation as virtuous. Instead of depriving yourself as a ritual, focus on each bite and appreciate its health benefits. "I've started keeping nuts and fruit near me when I work, and I'm taking breaks to sit down and eat," Kai says. "Not only do I like eating more, but [I'm] also getting some quiet time."
“Detox diets range from total starvation fasts to juice fasts to food modification approaches and often involve the use of laxatives, diuretics, vitamins, minerals and/or ‘cleansing foods,’” writes Hosen Kiat, Head of Cardiology at Macquarie University Hospital and the Australian School of Advanced Medicine, and Dr. Alice Klein from the Cardiac Health Institute, in a review about detoxification diets published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics.
The term "detox diet" is broad, divisive, and often conjures thoughts of cleanses featuring cayenne-laced lemon water that promise to curb cravings, boost energy, and help you lose weight. Many people are quick to say they’re all a hoax, too, since the body is more than capable of taking care of itself, thanks to our built-in detoxification system starring the liver.
Eggs offer high-quality protein at a low price. To keep calories at bay, make omelets, frittatas, and baked dishes with egg whites rather than yolks (a good ratio is two whites for every one yolk), but when it comes to quick meals or snacks a plain, a hard-cooked egg is hard to beat. These simple and classy deviled eggs make a great clean-eating appetizer for your next party, and the leftovers make delicious additions to your morning-after brunch
Several years ago, scientists discovered a brain detoxification process called the glymphatic system that occurs when you sleep. According to Andy R. Eugene and Jolanta Masiak, insufficient sleep impairs your glymphatic system, causing toxin build up. Without quality sleep in the right amounts on a consistent basis, your body cannot effectively detoxify.
Endotoxins include compounds such as lactic acid, urea and waste products from microbes in the gut. Exotoxins include environmental toxins and pollutants, pesticides, mercury in seafood, lead from car exhaust and air pollution, chemicals in tobacco smoke, dioxin in feminine care products, phthalates from plastic and parabens from lotions and cosmetics.
“Fragrance is a term protected under trade laws, and its legal for brands not to disclose the thousands of potentially toxic ingredients in their proprietary blend,” explains Coviello, who prefers using essential oils. Dryer sheets and laundry detergent also contain synthetic fragrances, so she recommends Common Good biodegradable and plant-based laundry detergent. “Wool dryer balls are a great substitute for dryer sheets and last several months,” she says.
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