In this easy one-pan dinner, boneless pork loin roast is cooked over a bed of carrots and parsnips for an all-in-one dish that makes an impressive centerpiece for a holiday meal or Sunday dinner. Choose free-range heritage pork if you can--its flavor really shines with no more seasoning than a bit of thyme and a little sea salt. If you'd like, dress up the meal with a traditional Irish apple condiment--Ploughmans chutney or Bramley applesauce, which you can find in specialty stores and online.
While Americans fall short on fruits and veggies, we’re overdoing it on sugar, consuming close to 20 teaspoons a day. Health authorities suggest capping added sugars at 6 teaspoons (equivalent to about 25 g) a day for women and 9 teaspoons (or about 36 g) for men. Challenge yourself to cut back on added sugar from sweetened yogurts, cereals and granola bars, as well as the usual suspects (soda, cookies, ice cream, cookies and other baked goods). You’ll appreciate the natural sweetness of fruit so much more when you cut unnecessary added sweeteners from your diet.
The easiest way to make sure your inter-meal nibbling stays on track is to have healthy snacks on hand for when hunger strikes. You can keep these nonperishable goodies in your desk drawers, or these energy-boosting nibbles in your gym bag. Simply keeping a bowl of fresh fruit on your kitchen counter will bring your snacking to the next healthy level.
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Her new eating plan Instead of detoxing to get more produce, Kelly needed to consume more whole fruit and vegetables as part of a balanced diet, Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D.N., in Chicago, tells SELF. "Dawn taught me ways to work them in, like adding lots of zucchini to pasta sauce," Kelly says. Kelly planned for treats, such as a small cup of ice cream, that she could enjoy without overdoing it. And she cut back on takeout by cooking big meals and saving half for later.
How is that possible? Because what makes you sick can make you fat, and what makes you fat can make you sick. It’s all connected. You know when your computer freezes up? What do you do? You reboot. Well, the 10-Day Detox can do the same thing for your metabolism — by following my diet and lifestyle practices, we can reset your metabolism to factory settings. You can lose weight without going hungry, and possibly even clear up a whole list of health symptoms. And all it takes is 10 days.
Her new eating plan VandeKerkhof made a big discovery when Dara Godfrey, M.S., R.D., a dietitian in New York City, asked her to keep a food diary. "Turns out, I was a saltaholic," she says. When she wasn't fasting, she snacked regularly on chips and salsa, pickles, and olives. "I started eating salsa with cucumber slices or high-fiber crackers instead. Right away, I lost five pounds." VandeKerkhof also took Godfrey's suggestion that she eat more dairy and protein to keep her feeling fuller longer and that she stabilize her blood sugar levels so she'd feel less moody and less captive to cravings. Godfrey also encouraged VandeKerkhof to eat a high-fiber breakfast (like Kashi Go Lean cereal) and a filling yet portion-controlled lunch (such as vegetable soup and a turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread), as it was the afternoon crash that typically sent her reaching for salty snacks.
The results At the end of the month, Johnson was shocked to find that, even after eating nearly twice as much, she felt less bloated and her clothes fit better. She had also lost eight pounds. "I couldn't believe how great I felt. I no longer had that midday drag. I realized I hadn't been kind to my body by eating as little as possible," Johnson says. "I've felt better in the past 30 days than I have in a long time. I get out of the shower and look at myself in the mirror and feel so great. I'm getting off the roller coaster."

Many people find cleanses and detoxes appealing as a way to reaffirm a commitment to healthy eating. While I certainly understand the desire dial down cravings for sweets and processed foods and create a pathway toward eating well over the long haul, the trouble I see with juicing and other similar cleanses is that too often, they leave people hangry, sluggish and distracted by constant thoughts of food. Cleansing can also lead to unwanted issues, like constipation (from lack of fiber) and bloating (due to excess fructose from juice cleanses).


Trans fat: Some trans fat is naturally in fatty meat and dairy products. Artificial trans fats  have been widely used in packaged baked goods and microwave popcorn. They're bad for heart health, so avoid them as much as possible. Look on the nutrition facts label to see how much trans fat is in an item. Know that something that says "0 g trans fat" may actually have up to half a gram of trans fat in it. So also check the ingredients list: If it mentions "partially hydrogenated" oils, those are trans fats.


This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Diets that provide plenty of fiber (about 25 to 29 grams per day) may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke by as much as 30%. Consuming whole grains such as whole wheat and oatmeal seems to offer the most heart-protecting benefits. One reason for this benefit may be that people may substitute whole-grain foods for less-healthy refined grains, such as white rice and white bread, which raise blood sugar and have other harmful metabolic effects. More »
Fasting indeed has a long-standing spiritual tradition. "Almost every religion has some type of fasting ritual -- Lent, Ramadan, Yom Kippur ... the Hindus and Buddhists fast, too," says James Dillard, MD, assistant clinical professor at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. He's author of Alternative Medicinefor Dummies.
At least half your grains should be whole grains, such as whole wheat, oats, barley, or brown rice. Whole grains retain the bran and germ and thus all (or nearly all) of the nutrients and fiber of the grain. One sure way of finding whole grains is to look for a product labeled “100% whole wheat” or “100%" of some other whole grain. You can also look for a whole grain listed as the first ingredient, though there still may be lots of refined wheat in the product. Another option is to look for the voluntary “Whole Grain Stamp” from the Whole Grains Council. Or try this tip: Look for less than a 10-to-1 ratio of “total carbohydrates” to “fiber” on the nutrition label. 
Turns out that lemon water really is a great way to start the day. Lemons—along with other forms of citrus such as tangerines and oranges—contain a compound called D-limonene, which has been shown to help reverse oxidative damage caused to the liver as a result of a high-fat diet. Sipping on lemon water throughout the day is also a great way to stay hydrated, which helps promote the movement of toxins out of the body.

Diets that provide plenty of fiber (about 25 to 29 grams per day) may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke by as much as 30%. Consuming whole grains such as whole wheat and oatmeal seems to offer the most heart-protecting benefits. One reason for this benefit may be that people may substitute whole-grain foods for less-healthy refined grains, such as white rice and white bread, which raise blood sugar and have other harmful metabolic effects. More »
An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.
The Center for Young Women’s Health (CYWH) is a collaboration between the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an educational entity that exists to provide teen girls and young women with carefully researched health information, health education programs, and conferences.
Frequently touted as a superfood, chia seed benefits range from enhanced digestion to better blood sugar control. Not surprisingly, chia seeds may also aid in detoxification as well. They pack in tons of fiber, which can help keep things moving through the digestive system, allowing waste products to be excreted efficiently. Plus, they’re high in antioxidants to fight off free radicals and protect your liver against damage and disease. (7)
Many noncredentialed people claim to be experts in detoxification, and many seasoned health professionals are not well versed in detoxification protocols. Because detoxification programs can vary widely and may pose a risk for some people (such as people with multiple maladies, those who take multiple medications and pregnant or breast-feeding women), it is important to work with a credentialed health professional who understands your health status and goals and who is able to evaluate detoxification programs for safety and effectiveness. Consider working with an integrative and functional medicine dietitian.
Many people are drawn to cleanses to reset their GI system, but there’s no evidence that the cleanses and detoxes you typically read about have any benefit. Instead of trying to flush out toxins, take measures to boost your gut health so it can do its job well. “A healthy gut is important for almost every aspect of wellness — from boosting your mood to helping you sleep, from weight management to preventing chronic diseases, the list goes on and on. To reboot your diet and reset your gut, remember to eat the three P's: prunes, pulses and pears,” says Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, nutrition and healthy cooking expert.
Supplements can't substitute for a healthy diet, which supplies other potentially beneficial compounds besides vitamins and minerals. Foods also provide the synergy that many nutrients require to be efficiently used in the body. Still, for many people a basic multivitamin/mineral pill can provide some of the nutrients they may fall short on. Certain people may also need supplements of folic acid, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D (see next slide).
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
Dinner? That's miso soup with some chopped sea vegetables (like the Japanese nori, used to make sushi) snipped over top. Or you might choose a cup of brown rice with a few chopped vegetables mixed in. "Brown rice gives your body plenty of B vitamins, which is a stress reducer. It's very high fiber, will fill you up, will help you sleep, and will flush you out in the morning."
Why she cleansed Everywhere she turned, Edwards felt enticed: She loved soda and butter, and a part-time job at the Cheesecake Factory meant she was often eating in a place where "one meal is enough calories for an entire day," she tells SELF. When she received a coupon for a BluePrint Cleanse—18 bottles of juice designed to be consumed in a specific order over the course of three days—it seemed like a chance to clean up her diet. "I'm fairly thin, but I'm not gonna say no to weight loss," she explains. "I doubt I would have tried it unless it was free, because it costs $195 for a three-day cleanse." Edwards lost six pounds in three days; not only was that more than doctors deem safe, but all the weight came back within a month.
In between meals, go ahead and have a snack. "When you go too long in between meals without eating, it is difficult to go into your next meal in control and avoid overeating,” Julia Levine Axelbaum, R.D., L.D., Bariatric Dietitian at NewStart Clinic, tells SELF. Of course, you'll want to be thoughtful about the kind of snacks you opt for. She explains that those that are high in protein, fiber, and complex carbohydrates will give you the energy you need to get through the day and keep you satiated from one meal to the next. On the other hand, those that are high in refined carbs and sugar will give you a sudden blood sugar spike that will eventually cause you to crash and feel even more tired.

Cycles of social reforms have been observed in religion, politics, the economy and other areas of human endeavor. Reforms to clean up society in regard to issues related to health also appear to come in cycles. Reform campaigns during Clean Living Movements include temperance (anti-alcohol), social purity (sexuality), diet, physical exercise, eugenics (heredity), public health, and anti-tobacco and drug campaigns. Interest in these issues rise and fall more or less simultaneously and often follow a religious awakening in which both evangelical sentiments and the development of new sects emerge. The movements also coincide with episodes of xenophobia or moral panic in which various minorities are targeted as undesirable influences for medical or moral reasons.
Eat like a tourist in Greece. The sunset over your office park isn't as stunning as the one over an Aegean beach, but a plate of grilled fish and fresh vegetables and a glass of wine is as delicious in Athens, Georgia, as it is in Athens, Greece. All the heart-healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants in Mediterranean foods like hummus, olive oil, and feta can help lower your risk for heart disease, says Susan Mitchell, Ph.D., coauthor of Fat Is Not Your Fate (Fireside).
Much like planning out your meals, doing meal prep saves you a lot of time—which is super helpful when the going gets busy as hell. When it comes to meal prepping, there are a few things you'll need to get yourself started: The right storage containers (AKA a sturdy set of BPA-free Tupperware), a well stocked pantry, fridge, and freezer, and a couple hours to spare on Sunday night.
Our bodies are exposed to more toxins than ever, and a detox can be a healthy way to halt the damage. But contrary to popular belief, the best detoxes aren’t restrictive or unsustainable. One that involves eliminating packaged foods and including a variety of antioxidant-rich vegetables, fruits, whole grains, quality proteins, and some of the nutrient-rich foods mentioned above is a safe, long-term approach to living a more vibrant life.
Besides being delicious and incredibly versatile, berries are a great source of both fiber and antioxidants, two important components of a well-balanced detox diet. Fiber moves slowly through the gastrointestinal tract and helps bulk up the stool to support regularity and excrete waste more efficiently. (3) Antioxidants, on the other hand, have been shown in animal models to protect the liver against oxidative stress while simultaneously preserving immune cell function. (4) Berries like blueberries and strawberries also have a high water content and can promote hydration as well as proper elimination.
If you have a well balanced diet and include all food groups as recommended in the food pyramid there is no need for detox diets.In reality, people often use them as a kick-start to a new healthy lifestyle, maybe as a new year's resolution. If you want to use a detox diet as a means to healthier you, then short-term use is fine, anything longer may lead to low levels of important nutrients in your body. Check out our food pyramid information sheet as well as the numerous fact sheets on improving the overall quality and balance of your diet in the factsheet section on our website.
At least half your grains should be whole grains, such as whole wheat, oats, barley, or brown rice. Whole grains retain the bran and germ and thus all (or nearly all) of the nutrients and fiber of the grain. One sure way of finding whole grains is to look for a product labeled “100% whole wheat” or “100%" of some other whole grain. You can also look for a whole grain listed as the first ingredient, though there still may be lots of refined wheat in the product. Another option is to look for the voluntary “Whole Grain Stamp” from the Whole Grains Council. Or try this tip: Look for less than a 10-to-1 ratio of “total carbohydrates” to “fiber” on the nutrition label. 
The first regulation of narcotic drugs were enacted during this period, regulating the contents of patent medicines. The first Pure Food and Drug Act, regulating the labelling of patent medicines and the claims made in their advertising, was passed in 1906. The smoking of opium was prohibited by the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914 as an exotic vice imported with immigration from China. In addition to these drug prohibitions, further immigration from East Asia was sharply curtailed by the Asian Exclusion Act of 1924. Likewise, the prohibition of cocaine during this period was associated with anecdotes about African Americans committing crimes under the influence of the drug.
Toxic overload is an often-overlooked factor in obesity, and the right detoxification plan can provide the nutrients your body requires to help you heal and lose weight. While these strategies are a powerfully effective starting point, a chiropractor or other healthcare professional can help you design a custom-tailored detoxification plan based on your individual needs.
Why she cleansed "Cleansing is spiritual for me," Kai tells SELF. "It's like cleaning out the debris in my consciousness." While studying in Europe during college, she got sick and her face broke out. After a friend suggested the master cleanse (water, maple syrup, cayenne pepper, and lemon juice), Kai's face cleared up. She'll never know if it was the detox or time that healed her. Still, she has done two herbal-supplement detoxes or juice fasts every year since. In between, she eats a raw vegetarian diet. Once she sits down at her desk to work, she becomes so focused that she often forgets to eat. As a result of her skimpy diet, Kai weighs too little. "My goal is to gain because I do want to have a child in a couple of years," she says.
"The front is all advertising," says Michelle K. Berman, R.D., of Fairfax, Virginia. Flip it around for the real story. The more ingredients, the more likely it has visited a few processing plants where something artificial was mixed in, says Lydia Zepeda, Ph.D., professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Plus, checking the label is a great way to find out if there are unnecessary ingredients in something seemingly healthy. Because, no, bread does not need added sugar.
Avoid alcoholic drinks (such as wine, beer, and spirits) during the cleanse. Alcohol is metabolized in the body mainly by the liver. It is broken down briefly to acetaldehyde, a chemical that has the potential to damage liver cells and body tissues, before it is further broken down and eliminated from the body. Besides lightening the load on your liver, avoiding alcohol (and caffeine) for the week can help to shift habits you've cultivated.

Suspicions of the inefficacy of purging became widespread by the 1830s.[4] Biochemistry and microbiology appeared to support auto-intoxication theory in the 19th century, but by the early twentieth century detoxification-based approaches quickly fell out of favour.[5][need quotation to verify][6] Even though abandoned by mainstream medicine, the idea has persisted in the popular imagination and amongst alternative medicine practitioners.[7][8][9] Notions of internal cleansing had resurgence along with the rise of alternative medicine in the 1970s and following; it remains unscientific and anachronistic.[7] With the rise of the environmentalist movement, many detox diets use the diet format as a political platform to advocate for environmental ideas about pollution and toxic contamination.[10]


The Center for Young Women’s Health (CYWH) is a collaboration between the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an educational entity that exists to provide teen girls and young women with carefully researched health information, health education programs, and conferences.
Gastrointestinal issues will create or exacerbate a faulty detoxification system. Improving your digestive system requires removing obstacles that create dysbiosis (gut imbalances) and other problems, but also incorporating the right gut-supporting foods and nutrients. Talk to your chiropractor or other healthcare professional if you suspect intestinal permeability (leaky gut) or other digestive problems.
During this era a focus on exercise, non-use of tobacco, and the elimination of coffee, tea, sugar, meat and spice from a diet, called "Grahamism," – named after reformer Sylvester Graham – was promoted. Eugenic or "hereditarian" concerns that masturbation would lead to insanity and that choosing sick or feeble spouses would lead to further degeneration was discussed. Out of this era Phrenology – the study of shapes and bumps on the head – used to select a healthy marriage partner was popular. New religions that promoted "pure" lifestyles such as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Seventh-day Adventists emerged.
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