Capturing the simplicity found in sun-drenched Mediterranean cuisine, these chicken thighs hold up nicely in the slow cooker, surrendering rich juices that make this fiber-packed farro extra-satisfying. Castelvetrano olives are bright green and buttery; look for them at your grocery’s olive bar. Having trouble finding pearled farro? Pick some up here. 
Watch your portion sizes: Check to see what the recommended portion sizes of foods you eat looks like in the bowls, plates, and glasses you use at home. When dining out avoid "supersizing" your meal or buying "combo" meal deals that often include large-size menu items. Choose small-size items instead or ask for a take home bag and wrap up half of your meal to take home before you even start to eat.

Grocery and fresh food distributor SpartanNash has introduced a Clean Ingredient Initiative for its Our Family and Open Acres private label brands that focuses on simpler products with reduced ingredient lists and clean, easy-to-read labels. SpartanNash is joining a growing movement among private label product companies to tap into our Clean Living investing theme and to […]
Sesame shrimp is usually a dish that’s been fried and coated in a sticky-sweet sauce. Here we incorporate sesame seeds into a light, supercrisp panko coating. Brown sugar and Sriracha go into the egg white used in the breading—a brilliant way to achieve big flavor in little time and with less added sugar. We love a bit of crisp-tender stem with the broccoli, though you can save on prep by using two (12-ounce) packages of fresh broccoli florets instead.
Get your bowls out for this cleanse, also known as “souping.” While true you’ll be sipping from soups that are thick with antioxidant-rich veggies and fibre, it’s not three days of broth. Instead, these produce-packed soups come with a list of protein, healthy fat and energy-boosting grain add ins, which is what make these diets different from their juicing counterparts. The soups not only infuse your body with nutrients, but can fire up your metabolism, even if you only try it for a few days. “After three days you start to get some really good benefits from detox diets,” says Wasserman.
If pizza, salad, or pasta is your go-to solution for meatless dinners, switch it up and try a vegetable hash instead. Traditional hashes are often tossed together from various leftovers found languishing in the fridge, but we're bringing them back as stars of the dinner table, and for great reason. Here, a beautiful poached egg tops a bowl of hearty, fibrous vegetables to create a balanced vegetarian meal in a flash. Feeling the need for extra protein? Add an extra egg to your serving. Meatless meals have never been easier, or more colorful!
Nowadays I don’t get sick and my throat is a lot better than when I started. (Did you hear that? I don’t get sick anymore! I got sick once last year and it was after I decided to test going completely off-wagon. Victory Dance!!). I can’t remember the last time I lost my voice. I feel more rested these days, like my sleep is actually restorative. I’m less stressed and my cortisol levels are evening out.
In the history of the United States, a clean living movement is a period of time when a surge of health-reform crusades, many with moral overtones, erupts into the popular consciousness. This results in individual, or group reformers such as the anti-tobacco or alcohol coalitions of the late twentieth century, to campaign to eliminate the health problem or to "clean up" society. The term "Clean Living Movement" was coined by Ruth C. Engs, a Professor of Applied Health Sciences at Indiana University in 1990.
Endotoxins include compounds such as lactic acid, urea and waste products from microbes in the gut. Exotoxins include environmental toxins and pollutants, pesticides, mercury in seafood, lead from car exhaust and air pollution, chemicals in tobacco smoke, dioxin in feminine care products, phthalates from plastic and parabens from lotions and cosmetics.
Certain devices are promoted to allegedly remove toxins from the body. One version involves a foot-bath using a mild electric current, while another involves small adhesive pads applied to the skin (usually the foot). In both cases, the production of an alleged brown "toxin" appears after a brief delay. In the case of the foot bath, the "toxin" is actually small amounts of rusted iron leaching from the electrodes.[17] The adhesive pads change color due to oxidation of the pads' ingredients in response to the skin's moisture. In both cases, the same color-changes occur irrespective of whether the water or patch even make contact with the skin (they merely require water—thus proving the color-change does not result from any body-detoxification process).[15]
Colon cleansing involves giving an enema (colonic) containing some salt, and sometimes coffee or herbs to remove food that, according to proponents,[citation needed] remains in the colon, producing nonspecific symptoms and general ill-health. However, the colon usually does not require any help cleaning itself.[citation needed] The practice can be potentially dangerous if incorrectly practised.[15]
A new twist on an old favorite ― if your favorite recipe calls for frying fish or breaded chicken, try healthier variations using baking or grilling. Maybe even try a recipe that uses dry beans in place of higher-fat meats. Ask around or search the internet and magazines for recipes with fewer calories ― you might be surprised to find you have a new favorite dish!
Eat like a tourist in Greece. The sunset over your office park isn't as stunning as the one over an Aegean beach, but a plate of grilled fish and fresh vegetables and a glass of wine is as delicious in Athens, Georgia, as it is in Athens, Greece. All the heart-healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants in Mediterranean foods like hummus, olive oil, and feta can help lower your risk for heart disease, says Susan Mitchell, Ph.D., coauthor of Fat Is Not Your Fate (Fireside).
As found in nuts, seeds, fish, avocados, and plant oils. You should consume these high-fat foods in place of other high-calorie foods; otherwise, you’ll be adding excess calories to your diet. For instance, substitute olive or canola oil for butter, and nuts for chips. Fatty fish may reduce the risk of heart disease and have other benefits, attributed at least in part to their omega-3 polyunsaturated fats.

Sometimes the "toxins" that are making it more difficult for our bodies to function optimally are foods that we’re intolerant or allergic to, but we don’t know it yet. Allergies are more obvious and often involve swelling and trouble breathing. But intolerances and their symptoms are subtler and can trigger an inflammatory response in the gut that leads to full-body inflammation and symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating, eczema, joint aches, and migraines.
“The human body is about 60 percent water, and your body needs to be continually hydrated throughout the day in order to optimally function,” explains Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. “In addition to drinking H20 and water-rich, low-calorie beverages like tea, you can also prioritize eating foods that are full of water — including fruits, veggies, broth-based soups and even oatmeal. These foods are also full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that will benefit your body. In the summer, I love blending fruit into a breakfast smoothie and grilling peaches for dessert,” she says.
Excess sodium, found in many processed foods and restaurant meals, raises blood pressure in some people and can have other adverse effects. The Dietary Guidelines recommend a limit of 2,300 milligrams a day for the general population; people with hypertension or prehypertension can benefit from a further reduction to 1,500 milligrams per day. As you cut back on sodium, eat more potassium-rich foods, which help lower blood pressure. These include citrus fruits, bananas, beans, avocados, some fish, and dairy products.
Disclaimer: The information provided on this website, by MaxLiving, is for general use only. Any statement or recommendation on this website does not take the place of medical advice nor is meant to replace the guidance of your licensed healthcare practitioner. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. MaxLiving information is and products are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or provide medical advice. Decisions to use supplements to support your specific needs should be considered in partnership with your licensed healthcare practitioner.
“Surfaces in the home and kitchen are in contact with food preparation and ultimately your mouth,” Coviello says. Her recipe for an inexpensive homemade cleaner is simple: distilled vinegar diluted in water and scented with essential oil. She recommends Brooklyn-based Common Good all-purpose cleaners, the brand sells refillable bottles that minimize plastic waste. Chic glass containers and sleek branding are a plus.
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