Sometimes the "toxins" that are making it more difficult for our bodies to function optimally are foods that we’re intolerant or allergic to, but we don’t know it yet. Allergies are more obvious and often involve swelling and trouble breathing. But intolerances and their symptoms are subtler and can trigger an inflammatory response in the gut that leads to full-body inflammation and symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating, eczema, joint aches, and migraines.
The Clean Living movement has become pervasive across restaurant menus in recent years. According to the Natural Restaurant Association, in 2016 it was reported that more than 8 in 10 of their guests paid more attention to the nutrition content of food when compared to two years prior. We see restaurateurs responding with more farm-to-table menus and overhauls of recipes in favor of made-from-scratch and organic ingredients.

But while our liver is always detoxifying our bloodstream, it’s not necessarily working optimally. The truth is, our bodies aren’t necessarily equipped to deal with the burden they’re now facing. Today, more than ever, we’re bombarded with countless toxins—from pollution to chemicals in skin care products to (perhaps most of all) sugar and preservatives in the foods we eat. These can throw blood sugar totally out of whack, deplete nutrient stores, cause a buildup of dangerous substances in the body like heavy metals, and lead to chronic inflammation—all of which can make us tired and sick. And we’ll continue to feel this way unless we make a shift.


It’s no secret that nuts are great for your health. They’re high in fiber, antioxidants, protein, heart-healthy fats as well as an assortment of the key vitamins and minerals that your body needs to stay healthy. In addition to keeping you regular due to their high fiber content, including healthy nuts in your diet can also help optimize liver function as well. Studies show that eating more nuts is linked to a lower risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as well as enhanced liver enzyme levels to maximize your body’s detoxifying potential. (8, 9)
Scientific skeptic author Brian Dunning investigated the subject in 2008 and concluded that "Anyone interested in detoxifying their body might think about paying a little more attention to their body and less attention to the people trying to get their money... Why is it that so many people are more comfortable self-medicating for conditions that exist only in advertisements, than they are simply taking their doctor's advice? It's because doctors are burdened with the need to actually practice medicine. They won't hide bad news from you or make up easy answers to please you."[24]
For people who don’t have the time, energy or interest to plan, shop, and prepare meals, subscription meal-delivery plans may encourage healthier eating and sometimes weight loss. Some plans feature low-sodium or vegetarian meals, which may benefit people with heart disease. Meal-kit plans deliver pre-portioned, mostly fresh ingredients with detailed preparation instructions, which may help people become more comfortable trying new foods and cooking techniques. Plans geared toward weight loss provide microwavable meals and pre-packaged snacks so people don’t have think about portion size or count calories. (Locked) More »

If you’re experiencing digestive woes, consider parsley. This often-overlooked herb acts as a natural diuretic and helps prevent bloating. It also contains anti-inflammatory vitamin C. Cilantro is another great pick, as it can help remove heavy metals like mercury and lead from the body. Try adding both of these herbs to your morning smoothie. Want more of a kick? Go for ginger, an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant spice that promotes balanced blood sugar and optimal digestion. Or start using more garlic, which contains naturally detoxifying sulfur compounds (just like cruciferous veggies) and combats the growth of unfriendly bacteria in the gut.

If you want to make some changes in your food intake, it’s a good idea to talk to your health care provider (HCP). You may also want to ask your HCP for a referral to see a dietitian (a person who has studied nutrition and knows about healthy eating). Learning about nutrition can help you make healthier choices, but it’s important to think of food as just one important part of your life.
The concept has received criticism from scientists and health organizations for its unsound scientific basis and lack of evidence for the claims made.[1] The "toxins" usually remain undefined, with little to no evidence of toxic accumulation in the patient. The British organisation Sense About Science has described some detox diets and commercial products as "a waste of time and money",[2] while the British Dietetic Association called the idea "nonsense" and a "marketing myth".[3]

I've struggled with my weight and a gluten allergy for most of my life. If this sounds like you, let me help to dispel myths about health and beauty, and support you in cultivating a balanced approach to a healthy lifestyle. My delicious whole foods recipes include meats, gluten free grains and veggies. Watch pounds melt away, as you grow healthier with each nutrient-rich bite!
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