Brigitte Zeitlin, M.P.H., R.D., C.D.N., founder of the New York-based BZ Nutrition, tells SELF, "Eating regularly throughout the day keeps your metabolism running at full speed, prevents dips in your energy, keeps you alert and focused, and [can help keep] your weight steady by preventing overeating at later meals." She and other experts recommend eating every three to four hours. If you don't, there are a number of unpleasant symptoms you may encounter.
Our clean living archive has grown so much over the past few years (yay!) that we decided it was time to create a roundup of our favorite clean DIY projects, along with a few tips. We’re passionate about replacing toxic products with clean alternatives, using essential oils daily, and educating our readers about little changes that can make a big difference in your health and overall well-being. Ready to see what made the list?

“The US has made it illegal to use thirty chemicals in personal care products, compared to other countries which have outlawed up to 1100,” she says. Kosås lipsticks are a favorite of Coviello’s: “it’s an incredible line of really good color, which can be hard to find in non-toxic makeup". She also recommends Beautycounter’s body lotion, which contains no toxic chemicals. Her secret weapon? Sunflower oil. “It’s similar to the skin’s natural oil, and can be used as a moisturizer and cleanser for the face and hair, replacing four different products,” she says, adding that coconut oil is a suitable alternative for people with non-oily skin.

This one should come as no surprise. An active body is a healthy body. Staying active isn’t just good for burning fat and keeping your heart healthy, but it’s also important for dealing with toxins. Physical activity gets your blood pumping and your lymphatic system, too, allowing it to expel the icky stuff it’s been collecting. Think of your body like water. Which is cleaner, a stagnant pond or a flowing stream?


Tematica Research provides equity research, economic insights, and investment ideas based upon its proprietary thematic perspective of the world and financial markets. The thematic discipline utilized by Tematica across its research and economic commentary, as well as its index and portfolio construction efforts, is the culmination of the more than 20 years Chief Investment Office Chris Versace spent analyzing industries and companies.  Read More >>
This little book is the perfect introduction and reference in clean eating. Sierra touches on the thoughts and science of clean eating, the sanity of living a cleaner lifestyle. I especially appreciated the food list and the pages on mindfulness and meditation. I do believe they are the best tools to eating clean. If you are looking for a wonderful, non-judgemental first guide to the CECL movement, this is a first step.
As part of our Clean Living investment theme, we’ve seen case volumes of not only sugary beverages but also those laced with artificial sweeteners come under pressure as consumers shift to healthier alternatives, including a variety of waters both still and sparkling. Existing soda giants, such as Coca-Cola have been expanding their beverage offering in […]

“One of the best ways to reboot your diet is to rethink your fruits and vegetables. Both fruits and vegetables provide fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (natural plant chemicals that help fight and prevent disease),” Toby Amidor, MS, RD, author of "Smart Meal Prep for Beginners," says. Most Americans aren’t anywhere close to meeting their needs. (90 percent fall short of vegetable recommendations and 85 percent aren’t meeting their fruit quota.) To help you boost your intake and your overall health, Amidor offers these suggestions: “Add sliced strawberries to your oatmeal at breakfast, opt for a vegetable salad topped with lean protein at lunch, and fill half your dinner plate with a steamed vegetable medley. And don’t forget snacks! Enjoy sliced carrots, celery and jicama with hummus or top your Greek yogurt with sliced strawberries.”

Dinner? That's miso soup with some chopped sea vegetables (like the Japanese nori, used to make sushi) snipped over top. Or you might choose a cup of brown rice with a few chopped vegetables mixed in. "Brown rice gives your body plenty of B vitamins, which is a stress reducer. It's very high fiber, will fill you up, will help you sleep, and will flush you out in the morning."

Colon cleansing involves giving an enema (colonic) containing some salt, and sometimes coffee or herbs to remove food that, according to proponents,[citation needed] remains in the colon, producing nonspecific symptoms and general ill-health. However, the colon usually does not require any help cleaning itself.[citation needed] The practice can be potentially dangerous if incorrectly practised.[15]
Your tip Restricting food in stressful times with a detox is counterproductive because it deprives your body of energy. You can get plenty of immune-bolstering vitamin C by filling half your plate with bright produce such as broccoli, bell peppers, kiwifruit, tomatoes, and strawberries at every meal, including in restaurants. "The lure of detox is that it's a quick fix," Blatner says. "But whatever you do for a few days will never make up for how you treat your body the other 362 days a year."
If you have a well balanced diet and include all food groups as recommended in the food pyramid there is no need for detox diets.In reality, people often use them as a kick-start to a new healthy lifestyle, maybe as a new year's resolution. If you want to use a detox diet as a means to healthier you, then short-term use is fine, anything longer may lead to low levels of important nutrients in your body. Check out our food pyramid information sheet as well as the numerous fact sheets on improving the overall quality and balance of your diet in the factsheet section on our website.
“Detox diets range from total starvation fasts to juice fasts to food modification approaches and often involve the use of laxatives, diuretics, vitamins, minerals and/or ‘cleansing foods,’” writes Hosen Kiat, Head of Cardiology at Macquarie University Hospital and the Australian School of Advanced Medicine, and Dr. Alice Klein from the Cardiac Health Institute, in a review about detoxification diets published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics.
That means one drink a day for women, two a day for men. People over 65 should drink even less. A drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1½ ounces of 80-proof spirits. While alcohol has potential heart benefits, it poses a variety of health risks, especially in excess amounts. And some people shouldn't drink at all, including pregnant women and those taking medications that interact with alcohol. People with liver disease, high trigylcerides, sleep apnea, and certain other conditions should ask their doctors about the advisability of drinking.
At least half your grains should be whole grains, such as whole wheat, oats, barley, or brown rice. Whole grains retain the bran and germ and thus all (or nearly all) of the nutrients and fiber of the grain. One sure way of finding whole grains is to look for a product labeled “100% whole wheat” or “100%" of some other whole grain. You can also look for a whole grain listed as the first ingredient, though there still may be lots of refined wheat in the product. Another option is to look for the voluntary “Whole Grain Stamp” from the Whole Grains Council. Or try this tip: Look for less than a 10-to-1 ratio of “total carbohydrates” to “fiber” on the nutrition label. 
Hearty, flavorful and full of fiber, Brussels sprouts make an awesome addition to a healthy detox diet. Not only can they promote regularity to get things moving, but Brussels sprouts have also been shown to boost liver health and enhance detoxification. In fact, one study published in Carcinogenesis showed that eating just 300 grams of Brussels sprouts daily was able to amp up the levels of detox enzymes by a whopping 30 percent. (2)
It’s true that most of us are exposed to a plethora of toxins, heavy metals and chemicals on a daily basis, found in everything from the air we breathe to the food on our plates. However, your body is equipped with a natural detox system that can help remove these dangerous compounds, and switching up your diet and lifestyle is the best way to maximize your body’s toxin-removing potential. Fortunately, you don’t need to shell out wads of cash or start munching on lettuce for weeks on end to see results.
Turns out that lemon water really is a great way to start the day. Lemons—along with other forms of citrus such as tangerines and oranges—contain a compound called D-limonene, which has been shown to help reverse oxidative damage caused to the liver as a result of a high-fat diet. Sipping on lemon water throughout the day is also a great way to stay hydrated, which helps promote the movement of toxins out of the body.
Get your bowls out for this cleanse, also known as “souping.” While true you’ll be sipping from soups that are thick with antioxidant-rich veggies and fibre, it’s not three days of broth. Instead, these produce-packed soups come with a list of protein, healthy fat and energy-boosting grain add ins, which is what make these diets different from their juicing counterparts. The soups not only infuse your body with nutrients, but can fire up your metabolism, even if you only try it for a few days. “After three days you start to get some really good benefits from detox diets,” says Wasserman.
Detoxification also is the process by which medications are metabolized, then excreted. Because toxins are potentially dangerous to human health, they need to be transformed and excreted from the body through urine, feces, respiration or sweat. Each person's ability to detoxify varies and is influenced by environment, diet, lifestyle, health status and genetic factors, suggesting some people could require more detoxification support than others. But if the amount of toxin to which a person is exposed exceeds his or her body's ability to excrete them, the toxins may be stored in fat cells, soft tissue and bone, negatively affecting health. This is the rationale that supports the use of practices that support the body's own detoxification capabilities.

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One extra note here: Chewing your produce has benefits over sipping it. It could take two heads of romaine lettuce to produce one cup of juice, and while two heads of romaine would leave you satisfied, a small cup of green juice probably won’t put a dent in hunger. Though you’ll get many of the same vitamins and minerals, juicing removes the fiber, which not only helps you fill up, but also provides important nourishment on its own.
Juice diets do prevent your body from going into a state called ketosis, he says. Ketosis means your body has no carbohydrates to burn for energy, so it has to burn stored fat or whatever else is available, he tells WebMD. "You feel bad, even smell bad. That's what makes you feel like hell during a [water-only] fast. But is that because the toxins are coming out? No! You're going into ketosis. It's known physiology."
Purchasing organic local produce is better for both the environment and your health, but when the nearest farm is hours away, don't default to a package of Oreos. "Frozen, canned and fresh fruit all have comparable amounts of nutrients," says Christine M. Bruhm, Ph.D., director of the Center for Consumer Research at the University of California at Davis.

Healthy eating should be about positive choices, focusing on foods that provide the nutrients you need to maintain good health. Unfortunately, much of the dietary advice available today focuses on what you “cannot” or “should not” eat. Our nutrition education resources and healthy eating articles will help you determine what you can do to make healthy eating decisions.
Her new eating plan Dietitian Sandon calculated that Johnson was eating only 800 calories a day—so few that she was slowing her metabolism and unable to build muscle. She created a plan to raise Johnson to 1,500 calories a day, enough to get nutrients without causing weight gain. Working with Sandon, Johnson began eating three meals a day, including a breakfast of eggs, fruit, and whole-grain toast, which is high in fiber, to keep foods moving through the body. At each meal, Johnson added a nutritious bonus, such as a yogurt smoothie for calcium. Finally, Sandon urged Johnson to share in the meals she cooked for her family to make eating a positive experience for her and to set a good example for her daughters.

Once you select a location of interest, a knowledgeable member our admissions team will guide you through the enrollment process from start to finish. The admissions process at Eudaimonia Recovery Homes is fast and easy and our goal is to make it a simple and stress-free experience for all of our applicants. Simply click the “Apply Today” button and fill out an online application. You may also visit our admissions page to download and email/fax us your application to reserve a spot today.


Shaving raw root veggies into a side-dish salad is a fantastic approach. They're ready in just a few minutes, their earthy flavors stay vibrant, and a simple vinaigrette tenderizes them while retaining some crunch. Toss the salad with ample vinaigrette, which does double duty: It lightly softens and "cooks" the raw veggies, and its tangy, zesty flavor complements the meaty tuna so that the fish doesn't need a sauce of its own.

These include soda, candy, white bread, regular pasta, and many snack foods and baked goods. A high intake of added sugar increases inflammation and insulin resistance, increasing the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders—and it supplies “empty” calories that contribute to weight gain. Refined grain products have little dietary fiber and have been stripped of many nutrients; a high intake can cause many of the same health problems as added sugar.
Fresh, Frozen, or Canned Fruits ― don’t think just apples or bananas. All fresh, frozen, or canned fruits are great choices. Be sure to try some “exotic” fruits, too. How about a mango? Or a juicy pineapple or kiwi fruit! When your favorite fresh fruits aren’t in season, try a frozen, canned, or dried variety of a fresh fruit you enjoy. One caution about canned fruits is that they may contain added sugars or syrups. Be sure and choose canned varieties of fruit packed in water or in their own juice.
Another way to be a good role model is to serve appropriate portions and not overeat. Talk about your feelings of fullness, especially with younger children. You might say, "This is delicious, but I'm full, so I'm going to stop eating." Similarly, parents who are always dieting or complaining about their bodies may foster these same negative feelings in their kids. Try to keep a positive approach about food.
The Center for Young Women’s Health (CYWH) is a collaboration between the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an educational entity that exists to provide teen girls and young women with carefully researched health information, health education programs, and conferences.
The products and/or claims made about specific products found on this website have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent disease. The information presented on this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information found on any product label or packaging. You should always consult with a qualified health care professional before starting any exercise, diet or supplement regimen.
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