“The human body is about 60 percent water, and your body needs to be continually hydrated throughout the day in order to optimally function,” explains Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. “In addition to drinking H20 and water-rich, low-calorie beverages like tea, you can also prioritize eating foods that are full of water — including fruits, veggies, broth-based soups and even oatmeal. These foods are also full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that will benefit your body. In the summer, I love blending fruit into a breakfast smoothie and grilling peaches for dessert,” she says.
Use a stainless steel pan instead of a nonstick here, if possible. A stainless surface will better collect fond (also known as browned bits) from the pork, which is then deglazed to lend rich flavor to the mushrooms and onions as they cook. Cook pork tenderloin on the stovetop instead of oven-roasting it; this gives it a delicious brown crust. Medium heat is key: It browns the pork without burning or toughening the surface before the middle reaches the right temp.
Traditional Irish lamb stew is made with inexpensive shoulder or neck cuts of lamb, but for possibly the best Irish stew you'll ever make, give this version made with leg of lamb a try. Choose a bone-in cut to make the rich, flavorful broth for this healthy lamb stew. Requiring just a handful of ingredients and 35 minutes of active time, this lamb stew isn't just tasty--it's also easy!
During this era a focus on exercise, non-use of tobacco, and the elimination of coffee, tea, sugar, meat and spice from a diet, called "Grahamism," – named after reformer Sylvester Graham – was promoted. Eugenic or "hereditarian" concerns that masturbation would lead to insanity and that choosing sick or feeble spouses would lead to further degeneration was discussed. Out of this era Phrenology – the study of shapes and bumps on the head – used to select a healthy marriage partner was popular. New religions that promoted "pure" lifestyles such as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Seventh-day Adventists emerged.
There are plenty of reasons to consider adding beets to your diet. Not only are they vibrant and full of color, but they’re also high in an array of vitamins, minerals and micronutrients that can boost detoxification. One animal study found that drinking beetroot juice regularly helped increase the levels of several key enzymes involved in detoxification. (5) Similarly, another animal study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showed that beetroot juice decreased lipid peroxidation, a marker used to measure cell damage, in the liver by 38 percent. (6)

Fast-forward two years, however, and the culinary landscape is unrecognisable; not only has Evans’s recent cooking tome Healthy Every Day (Pan Macmillan) emerged as one of 2014’s bestsellers, but similar books spruiking the clean-living message from the likes of Sarah Wilson (I Quit Sugar) and Luke Hines and Scott Gooding (Clean Living) are flying off the shelves at a rate of more than a million copies a year.


Her new eating plan VandeKerkhof made a big discovery when Dara Godfrey, M.S., R.D., a dietitian in New York City, asked her to keep a food diary. "Turns out, I was a saltaholic," she says. When she wasn't fasting, she snacked regularly on chips and salsa, pickles, and olives. "I started eating salsa with cucumber slices or high-fiber crackers instead. Right away, I lost five pounds." VandeKerkhof also took Godfrey's suggestion that she eat more dairy and protein to keep her feeling fuller longer and that she stabilize her blood sugar levels so she'd feel less moody and less captive to cravings. Godfrey also encouraged VandeKerkhof to eat a high-fiber breakfast (like Kashi Go Lean cereal) and a filling yet portion-controlled lunch (such as vegetable soup and a turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread), as it was the afternoon crash that typically sent her reaching for salty snacks.

Get your bowls out for this cleanse, also known as “souping.” While true you’ll be sipping from soups that are thick with antioxidant-rich veggies and fibre, it’s not three days of broth. Instead, these produce-packed soups come with a list of protein, healthy fat and energy-boosting grain add ins, which is what make these diets different from their juicing counterparts. The soups not only infuse your body with nutrients, but can fire up your metabolism, even if you only try it for a few days. “After three days you start to get some really good benefits from detox diets,” says Wasserman.


When celebrity chef and My Kitchen Rules host Pete Evans bravely revealed his clean-eating diet in a national paper two years ago, the backlash was immediate. “Muffins made of carob, goji berries and stevia?” we exclaimed, spraying croissant crumbs everywhere. “Who on Earth snacks on activated nuts?” Within 24 hours, “activated almonds” was trending on Twitter with 4320 mentions, and Evans took to social media to defend his unholy, nutrient-dense eating habits.
In our increasingly modern and fast-paced world focusing on lives of convenience, our health is suffering. Obesity, heart disease and cancer rates have skyrocketed. Couples struggle with infertility and children struggle with serious behavior issues at younger and younger ages.  We’ve all heard the old line, “Must be something in the water.” Well, it’s become more like there must be something in everything.
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