But as certain taboos begin to disappear and groups become less socially conservative, we see a change in what clean living means. While our grandparents and great-grandparents, and great-great-grandparents may have been thinking about morality and the condition of their souls when they talked about clean living, today it’s becoming a movement more directly connected to health – a movement that’s overdue.
To gain weight safely in older age, eat several smaller meals and focus on nutrient-dense foods. Examples include oatmeal with berries and walnuts; a salad with spinach, tomatoes, cheese, beans, shelled sunflower seeds, and avocado dressing; brown rice with raisins, almonds, chicken chunks, and asparagus pieces; or simple meals and snacks such as scrambled eggs with cheese or whole-wheat crackers with peanut butter. A healthy weight gain should happen slowly. Aim for gaining 2 or 3 pounds per month. (Locked) More »
Your tip Johnson was scared of carbs, she says, and working with a dietitian helped her get past her fears. If you've been detoxing to avoid carbohydrates, start slowly by adding two to three servings a day of the healthiest kinds—whole-grain breads and starchy vegetables, including peas, sweet potatoes, squash, and corn. Work your way up to the recommended three to five daily servings.

Why she cleansed When her Bikram yoga instructor began touting detox diets, VandeKerkhof was pregnant with her first child, and the idea resonated. "I started to think a lot about toxins," she tells SELF. "Everything you eat transfers to your baby." After weaning her second child, she was bloated, tired, and anxious, and she finally gave the trend a try, spending $300 for a 28-day Arise & Shine colon-cleanse program. "For three weeks, you eat only raw foods, then for one week you have only juice or water," she says.

Some still consider fasting -- in any form -- to be "out there." "When I review diets that are not based on science, the question I ask myself is: Would I feed them to my family? In this case, the answer is a clear no," says Susan Roberts, PhD, chief of the Energy Metabolism Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and a professor of nutrition at Tufts University in Boston.


Health experts recommend two or three servings of a variety of seafood a week, but many “clean” eaters eat even more than that. Oily fish like tuna have the extra benefit of supplying good fats like the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA. These healthy fats reduce your risk of heart disease, enhance your immune system, and lower blood pressure. Here, we combined the classic Niçoise combo of haricots verts, potatoes, hard-cooked eggs, tuna, and olives with whole-grain rye berries, which have a nutty, faintly peppery-tangy flavor. If you can’t find them, use farro or wheat berries. 
Watch your portion sizes: Check to see what the recommended portion sizes of foods you eat looks like in the bowls, plates, and glasses you use at home. When dining out avoid "supersizing" your meal or buying "combo" meal deals that often include large-size menu items. Choose small-size items instead or ask for a take home bag and wrap up half of your meal to take home before you even start to eat.
Thematic investing looks to identify pain points by looking at the intersection of shifting economics, demographics, psychographics and technologies, mixed in with regulatory mandates and other forces. Such pain points result in a pronounced secular market shift that shapes and impacts behavior, forcing companies to make fundamental changes to their businesses to succeed.  Read More >>
“Add in some probiotics into your diet, as well as prebiotics,” she said. “Prebiotics help probiotics thrive and flourish and you can find them in bananas, Jerusalem artichoke, and a lot of high fiber foods. Probiotics are going to come from fermented foods like miso, tempeh, and sauerkraut as well as yogurts that contain ‘live and active cultures.’” 
Magkos, F., Fraterrigo, G., Yoshino, J., Luecking, C., Kirbach, K., Kelly, S. C., … Klein, S. (2016, April 12). Effects of moderate and subsequent progressive weight loss on metabolic function and adipose tissue biology in humans with obesity. Cell Metabolism, 23(4), 591–601. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413116300535
Purchasing organic local produce is better for both the environment and your health, but when the nearest farm is hours away, don't default to a package of Oreos. "Frozen, canned and fresh fruit all have comparable amounts of nutrients," says Christine M. Bruhm, Ph.D., director of the Center for Consumer Research at the University of California at Davis.
I’ve also gone on this amazing journey of self-reflection and introspection that I didn’t really anticipate. It was meant to be a physical journey for physical improvements, but it has become a spiritual journey as well. 1 year of clean eating became 1 year of clean living. Being less anxious and stressed lead to having more fun and being present in the moment. Daily journaling helps channel frustration and set intention and the daily gratitude exercises reframes my view of the world. and small obstacles I might face.
Most detoxification programs recommend removing processed foods and foods to which some people are sensitive, such as dairy, gluten, eggs, peanuts and red meat, and eating mostly organically grown vegetables, fruit, whole nonglutenous grains, nuts, seeds and lean protein. Other programs recommend fasting, a potentially risky practice for some people, which may actually suppress detoxification pathways in the body. This is why many health practitioners advise against this practice.
Sonya heard about detox diets from her yoga teacher. Sarah got the tip at a health food store. Kendell's real estate agent urged her to try one. All three were told detoxing would rid their body of toxins, give them energy, and help them lose weight—fast! You've probably heard it, too, from celebrities touting the perks of detoxing, or from ubiquitous ads for supplement regimens and juice-fasting kits.
Suspicions of the inefficacy of purging became widespread by the 1830s.[4] Biochemistry and microbiology appeared to support auto-intoxication theory in the 19th century, but by the early twentieth century detoxification-based approaches quickly fell out of favour.[5][need quotation to verify][6] Even though abandoned by mainstream medicine, the idea has persisted in the popular imagination and amongst alternative medicine practitioners.[7][8][9] Notions of internal cleansing had resurgence along with the rise of alternative medicine in the 1970s and following; it remains unscientific and anachronistic.[7] With the rise of the environmentalist movement, many detox diets use the diet format as a political platform to advocate for environmental ideas about pollution and toxic contamination.[10]
This little book is the perfect introduction and reference in clean eating. Sierra touches on the thoughts and science of clean eating, the sanity of living a cleaner lifestyle. I especially appreciated the food list and the pages on mindfulness and meditation. I do believe they are the best tools to eating clean. If you are looking for a wonderful, non-judgemental first guide to the CECL movement, this is a first step.
Juice diets do prevent your body from going into a state called ketosis, he says. Ketosis means your body has no carbohydrates to burn for energy, so it has to burn stored fat or whatever else is available, he tells WebMD. "You feel bad, even smell bad. That's what makes you feel like hell during a [water-only] fast. But is that because the toxins are coming out? No! You're going into ketosis. It's known physiology."

PepsiCo’s (PEP) recent acquisition of SodaStream (SODA) is but one of a long string of acquisitions in the “Natural” space as of late. J.M Smuckers, General Mills, Mondelez . . . they’ve all stocked their “pantries” with strategic acquisitions, not to mention recrafting of mainstay brands with updated versions that are Non-GMO, free of artificial flavors […]
Sonya heard about detox diets from her yoga teacher. Sarah got the tip at a health food store. Kendell's real estate agent urged her to try one. All three were told detoxing would rid their body of toxins, give them energy, and help them lose weight—fast! You've probably heard it, too, from celebrities touting the perks of detoxing, or from ubiquitous ads for supplement regimens and juice-fasting kits.
Many people are drawn to cleanses to reset their GI system, but there’s no evidence that the cleanses and detoxes you typically read about have any benefit. Instead of trying to flush out toxins, take measures to boost your gut health so it can do its job well. “A healthy gut is important for almost every aspect of wellness — from boosting your mood to helping you sleep, from weight management to preventing chronic diseases, the list goes on and on. To reboot your diet and reset your gut, remember to eat the three P's: prunes, pulses and pears,” says Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, nutrition and healthy cooking expert.
Sometimes the "toxins" that are making it more difficult for our bodies to function optimally are foods that we’re intolerant or allergic to, but we don’t know it yet. Allergies are more obvious and often involve swelling and trouble breathing. But intolerances and their symptoms are subtler and can trigger an inflammatory response in the gut that leads to full-body inflammation and symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating, eczema, joint aches, and migraines.
Why she cleansed "I was looking for focus," Kelly, who was traveling for work, studying for the bar, buying a home, and moving, tells SELF. She often ate meals out with friends and reached for Twix bars and fries on the road. Kelly's real estate agent suggested her frazzled client try the cleanse outlined in her favorite book, which called for days of only fruit followed by days of vegetable juices. "I needed energy, so I was willing to go along with the potential craziness."
Pesticides are toxins, "and I think there's good cause for worry about them," says Purdy. A new study in Food and Chemical Toxicology links pesticide-laced feed to tumors and early death in rats. Organic is ideal, but if that's not possible, pick produce with thick skins that peel off, because they're less likely to be contaminated. (Here's how to save money on organics.)
Sesame shrimp is usually a dish that’s been fried and coated in a sticky-sweet sauce. Here we incorporate sesame seeds into a light, supercrisp panko coating. Brown sugar and Sriracha go into the egg white used in the breading—a brilliant way to achieve big flavor in little time and with less added sugar. We love a bit of crisp-tender stem with the broccoli, though you can save on prep by using two (12-ounce) packages of fresh broccoli florets instead.
Toxic overload is an often-overlooked factor in obesity, and the right detoxification plan can provide the nutrients your body requires to help you heal and lose weight. While these strategies are a powerfully effective starting point, a chiropractor or other healthcare professional can help you design a custom-tailored detoxification plan based on your individual needs.
When companies ranging from PepsiCo and Coca-Cola add aggressively to their product portfolio it likely means we are at or near an inflection point in terms of consumer preference. That is what we are seeing with flavored seltzers given PepsiCo’s 2018 introduction of its bubly Sparkling Water, its more recent acquisition of SodaStream and Coca-Cola testing its Dasani […]
Hearty, flavorful and full of fiber, Brussels sprouts make an awesome addition to a healthy detox diet. Not only can they promote regularity to get things moving, but Brussels sprouts have also been shown to boost liver health and enhance detoxification. In fact, one study published in Carcinogenesis showed that eating just 300 grams of Brussels sprouts daily was able to amp up the levels of detox enzymes by a whopping 30 percent. (2)
The best way to begin a detox is by visiting your healthcare practitioner to discuss your plan and any symptoms you’re experiencing. “You might think that you have toxins but you may have something that’s more severe. It’s important to have someone assess that,” Vayali advises. Your doctor or naturopath can also recommend foods and lifestyle changes that are healthiest for you.

Step 1: The first step is to eliminate sugar and processed foods from your diet, Gooding says, adding that he believes sugar is the cause of many diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. “Processed foods predominantly use cheap, rancid oil, sugar and myriad additives and preservatives that aren’t suited for the human body,” he says. Also limit grain intake to nutrient-rich whole grains. Greely recommends buckwheat, spelt and quinoa.
×