According to data published by the NPD Group: Three out of five Americans say they want more protein in their diets; Fourteen percent of U.S. consumers, or more than 43 million people, regularly use plant-based products and 86 percent of them aren’t vegans or vegetarian. These figures are in sync with the growing influence of our Clean Living investing […]
To help remind me of my focus, I made this wellness pyramid. It’s  visual depiction of what I will prioritize in my quest for balanced wellness. I think of it like a food pyramid or like Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs, but refocused on finding overall wellbeing. In both systems, the base is the foundation and the top priority.  It’s easier to achieve the higher levels of the pyramid if you satisfy the base layers. It’s a great visual reminder of what to prioritize if your short on time or resources. Here’s mine:
You are what you eat! What you eat can affect every aspect of your health, so make sure you’re eating the good stuff. You can learn more about clean eating from our blog series here, but, in a nutshell, clean eating means eating a diet of whole, organic and unprocessed foods – you know, real food. Avoid things with additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.
Common food intolerances include those to soy, gluten, corn, eggs, peanuts, shellfish, and dairy. If you have some of the symptoms above, consider eliminating potential trigger foods for a period of time (it usually takes a few weeks to notice a difference), preferably under the supervision of a doctor or registered dietitian. You’ll also want to eliminate alcohol since your body registers alcohol as a toxin and relies on your liver to process and eliminate it, which can put stress on the organ.
The baby boom generation of the post World War II era had experimented with different behaviors not tolerated by the older generation. By the mid 1970s more conservative Americans began to react against what they perceived as immoral behaviors. They coalesced into political action that included campaigns against the use of drugs, alcohol, sexual, and other activities. A secular health-reform movement, that to some became a "religion," also surged out of the youthful generation. Fitness and exercise, diet, alternative religions and medicine, consumers rights, smoke-free environments, and other health reforms became prime concerns of the day.
Detoxification also is the process by which medications are metabolized, then excreted. Because toxins are potentially dangerous to human health, they need to be transformed and excreted from the body through urine, feces, respiration or sweat. Each person's ability to detoxify varies and is influenced by environment, diet, lifestyle, health status and genetic factors, suggesting some people could require more detoxification support than others. But if the amount of toxin to which a person is exposed exceeds his or her body's ability to excrete them, the toxins may be stored in fat cells, soft tissue and bone, negatively affecting health. This is the rationale that supports the use of practices that support the body's own detoxification capabilities.
Her new eating plan Kai wasn't getting enough calories or nutrients, especially calcium, iron, and B12, she learned from Ruth Frechman, M.A., R.D.N., C.P.T., in Los Angeles, tells SELF. So Frechman encouraged Kai to incorporate nutrient-rich vegetarian foods such as yogurt, tofu, and edamame. Kai also ate almost no fat, so Frechman prescribed avocados, nuts, and olive oil, all rich in omega-3 fatty acids.
Detoxification is a process that the body performs around the clock utilizing important nutrients from the diet. It's the process that transforms molecules that need to be removed from the body, or "toxins." They fall into two main categories: molecules that are made in the body as byproducts of regular metabolism (endotoxins), and those that come from outside the body and are introduced to the system by eating, drinking, breathing or are absorbed through the skin (exotoxins).
All frozen desserts like ice cream, gelato, or frozen yogurt are treats with varying amounts of calories, fat, and sugar. Dairy-free options aren’t necessarily healthier. To make the healthiest choice, one must read Nutrition Facts labels and ingredients lists, and look for a treat with the lowest amounts of sugar, fat, calories, and sodium. It’s also important to remember that the amount of nutrients one consumes in a frozen treat should fit into the food intake for the day, not just one meal. (Locked) More »
You are what you eat! What you eat can affect every aspect of your health, so make sure you’re eating the good stuff. You can learn more about clean eating from our blog series here, but, in a nutshell, clean eating means eating a diet of whole, organic and unprocessed foods – you know, real food. Avoid things with additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.
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