Bone broth, a liquid made from the water left over after simmering bones for up to a day at a time, has been associated with a number of incredible benefits. Perhaps most impressive, however, is its potent effects on detoxification. Studies suggest that bone broth may help improve immune health by reducing inflammation, allowing your body to work more effectively at removing harmful toxins, bacteria and pathogens from the body. (10) Because it’s rich in collagen and an assortment of amino acids, it’s also believed to help seal the gut and protect against leaky gut syndrome, a condition that allows toxins and particles to seep from the gut into the bloodstream.

The latest Dietary Guidelines no longer give a daily cap for dietary cholesterol (previously it was 300 milligrams), because there’s abundant evidence that dietary cholesterol (found only in animal foods) has little if any effect on most people's blood cholesterol. Rather, saturated fats raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol more than dietary cholesterol does. But don't go overboard with cholesterol-rich foods, since many of them are also high in saturated fats. And if you have cardiovascular disease or diabetes, ask your doctor if you should limit dietary cholesterol.


As health concerns arise with the chemicals in cleaning and household products, more natural, fragrance-free cleaning products have moved into the mainstream. Also, products that have high recycling content and environmentally friendly processes have gained favor, as well as clean energy products in the vein of solar, wind, LED lighting and electric vehicles. Other areas include low VOC furniture, mattresses, paint and flooring.
Sonya heard about detox diets from her yoga teacher. Sarah got the tip at a health food store. Kendell's real estate agent urged her to try one. All three were told detoxing would rid their body of toxins, give them energy, and help them lose weight—fast! You've probably heard it, too, from celebrities touting the perks of detoxing, or from ubiquitous ads for supplement regimens and juice-fasting kits.
"The front is all advertising," says Michelle K. Berman, R.D., of Fairfax, Virginia. Flip it around for the real story. The more ingredients, the more likely it has visited a few processing plants where something artificial was mixed in, says Lydia Zepeda, Ph.D., professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Plus, checking the label is a great way to find out if there are unnecessary ingredients in something seemingly healthy. Because, no, bread does not need added sugar.
Check your diary and mark a week where you have a clean break from functions or events that might derail your detox, such as weddings, birthdays or special occasion meals. Some people may experience a 'cleansing' reaction in the first few days of detox, including headaches or loose bowel movements. This is due to the sudden withdrawal of certain foods, in addition to stimulation of detoxifying organs. These symptoms should subside in 24 to 48 hours.
Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts contain sulfur-containing phytochemicals called glucosinolates, which are protective against cancer, anti-inflammatory, and may help the body remove toxins. One study found that a drink made with broccoli activated enzymes that helped pick up pollutants from the bloodstream and flush them out via urine. Cruciferous veggies are also high in fiber, which helps feed "good" probiotic gut bacteria and promote digestion. That’s critical, since a damaged (or leaky) gut allows various toxins and bacteria into the bloodstream, contributing to issues like systemic inflammation and autoimmune disease.
A clean-eating diet, such as the Eat Clean Diet from fitness and health author Tosca Reno focuses on eating only clean, unprocessed whole foods. It’s similar to the elimination diet but takes it one step further by saying goodbye to all vices: sugar, caffeine, processed foods and more. “Once a year for a week or so I eat very clean and lighten things up,” says Wasserman. “I make sure I eat lighter grains such as quinoa, mostly veggies and watch my sugar intake.”
It’s true that most of us are exposed to a plethora of toxins, heavy metals and chemicals on a daily basis, found in everything from the air we breathe to the food on our plates. However, your body is equipped with a natural detox system that can help remove these dangerous compounds, and switching up your diet and lifestyle is the best way to maximize your body’s toxin-removing potential. Fortunately, you don’t need to shell out wads of cash or start munching on lettuce for weeks on end to see results.
"The front is all advertising," says Michelle K. Berman, R.D., of Fairfax, Virginia. Flip it around for the real story. The more ingredients, the more likely it has visited a few processing plants where something artificial was mixed in, says Lydia Zepeda, Ph.D., professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Plus, checking the label is a great way to find out if there are unnecessary ingredients in something seemingly healthy. Because, no, bread does not need added sugar.
Can’t stomach drinking cayenne pepper or maple syrup-spiked lemon water for a week? Thankfully detox diets don’t have to be that way. “Detox diets don’t have to be these scary diets,” says Marni Wasserman, a Toronto-based culinary holistic nutritionist. “You can find a way to do it that it fits you and your lifestyle.” Here are five detox diets worth doing.
Avoid alcoholic drinks (such as wine, beer, and spirits) during the cleanse. Alcohol is metabolized in the body mainly by the liver. It is broken down briefly to acetaldehyde, a chemical that has the potential to damage liver cells and body tissues, before it is further broken down and eliminated from the body. Besides lightening the load on your liver, avoiding alcohol (and caffeine) for the week can help to shift habits you've cultivated.
Trans fat: Some trans fat is naturally in fatty meat and dairy products. Artificial trans fats  have been widely used in packaged baked goods and microwave popcorn. They're bad for heart health, so avoid them as much as possible. Look on the nutrition facts label to see how much trans fat is in an item. Know that something that says "0 g trans fat" may actually have up to half a gram of trans fat in it. So also check the ingredients list: If it mentions "partially hydrogenated" oils, those are trans fats.

In this week’s issue, we dig into the latest shareholder letter from Warren Buffett, examine the growing number of dividend cuts and other factors make the year to date melt up in the stock market something of a head-scratcher. That best performance in 20+ years hinges on a successful trade deal with China, but there are other factors that we need to examine so we don’t fall prey to a “buy the rumor, sell the news” scenario. We recap the sharp move in Universal Display shares following its latest earnings report and touch on favorable news emanating from Mobile World Congress 2019 for Nokia.
Last week’s economic data confirms the global economy continues to slow, and for now, the US remains the best economy on the block. Through the first two months of 2019, the domestic stock market has been on fire even as earnings expectations and dividends continue to be cut. As earnings season fades, time to watch insider selling activity to gauge what lies ahead. Following last week’s earnings report and subsequent drop, we’re doubling down on a Digital Infrastructure Thematic Leader.
Trans fat: Some trans fat is naturally in fatty meat and dairy products. Artificial trans fats  have been widely used in packaged baked goods and microwave popcorn. They're bad for heart health, so avoid them as much as possible. Look on the nutrition facts label to see how much trans fat is in an item. Know that something that says "0 g trans fat" may actually have up to half a gram of trans fat in it. So also check the ingredients list: If it mentions "partially hydrogenated" oils, those are trans fats.
At least half your grains should be whole grains, such as whole wheat, oats, barley, or brown rice. Whole grains retain the bran and germ and thus all (or nearly all) of the nutrients and fiber of the grain. One sure way of finding whole grains is to look for a product labeled “100% whole wheat” or “100%" of some other whole grain. You can also look for a whole grain listed as the first ingredient, though there still may be lots of refined wheat in the product. Another option is to look for the voluntary “Whole Grain Stamp” from the Whole Grains Council. Or try this tip: Look for less than a 10-to-1 ratio of “total carbohydrates” to “fiber” on the nutrition label. 
Grocery and fresh food distributor SpartanNash has introduced a Clean Ingredient Initiative for its Our Family and Open Acres private label brands that focuses on simpler products with reduced ingredient lists and clean, easy-to-read labels. SpartanNash is joining a growing movement among private label product companies to tap into our Clean Living investing theme and to […]
The easiest way to make sure your inter-meal nibbling stays on track is to have healthy snacks on hand for when hunger strikes. You can keep these nonperishable goodies in your desk drawers, or these energy-boosting nibbles in your gym bag. Simply keeping a bowl of fresh fruit on your kitchen counter will bring your snacking to the next healthy level.
Detoxification is a process that the body performs around the clock utilizing important nutrients from the diet. It's the process that transforms molecules that need to be removed from the body, or "toxins." They fall into two main categories: molecules that are made in the body as byproducts of regular metabolism (endotoxins), and those that come from outside the body and are introduced to the system by eating, drinking, breathing or are absorbed through the skin (exotoxins).

Simple, high quality ingredients are the key to putting nutritious, “clean” meals on the table fast. Beef tenderloin is naturally high in protein and is a good source of iron, B12, B6, and niacin. Small amounts of protein eaten throughout the day build lean muscle mass, promote satiety, and keep blood glucose levels stable so you don’t feel sluggish. Ask your butcher for the Chateaubriand cut, which is an evenly sized portion taken from the heart of the tenderloin. Serve it with our recipe for a simple Roasted Broccolini, pictured above.
Create an eating style that can improve your health now and in the future by making small changes over time. Consider changes that reflect your personal preferences, culture and traditions. Think of each change as a “win” as you build positive habits and find solutions that reflect your healthy eating style. Each change is a MyWin that can help you build your healthy eating style. Use the tips and links below to find little victories that work for you.
Food processing isn’t always a bad thing: Cooking and preparing raw ingredients at home is also processing them. But the word “processed” is almost always reserved for commercial foods, usually packaged. Highly processed foods are industrially formulated mixtures that are no longer recognizable as their original plant or animal sources—everything from hot dogs and margarine to ice cream, candy, and many packaged snack foods. Such foods, which supply more than half the daily calories in most U.S. households, lack key nutrients and fiber and are high in sugars and sodium. 
A body cleanse or detox diet that involves cutting out junk foods and increasing your intake of nutritious whole foods along with a few powerful detox foods can be an easy way to help your body detox and hit the reset button. Best of all, unlike on other detox diets, this kind of natural cleanse won’t drain your energy levels or leave you feeling worn down. Instead, it can boost energy, restore motivation and help you feel your best.
Vayali generally recommends that her patients cut out processed foods from their diets. These include things like store-bought pastries, microwave dinners, candies – many of the pre-prepared products you find in the middle aisles of your grocery store. Instead of relying on these convenience items, fill up on whole foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats and fish.
Our clean living archive has grown so much over the past few years (yay!) that we decided it was time to create a roundup of our favorite clean DIY projects, along with a few tips. We’re passionate about replacing toxic products with clean alternatives, using essential oils daily, and educating our readers about little changes that can make a big difference in your health and overall well-being. Ready to see what made the list?
This one should come as no surprise. An active body is a healthy body. Staying active isn’t just good for burning fat and keeping your heart healthy, but it’s also important for dealing with toxins. Physical activity gets your blood pumping and your lymphatic system, too, allowing it to expel the icky stuff it’s been collecting. Think of your body like water. Which is cleaner, a stagnant pond or a flowing stream?
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