Sweet potatoes are loaded with beta carotene (pre-Vitamin A), Vitamin C, and potassium, not to mention fiber and complex carbohydrates, making them a better choice than white potatoes in most cases. They regularly appear on clean menus alongside lean proteins like chicken, pork, and fish. Oven-frying cuts the fat and calories from these potatoes while still giving you a crisp, tender product. And making them yourself (as opposed to out of a frozen food bag) ensures you’re using unprocessed ingredients. Here, a sprinkling of grated orange peel adds a zesty note. Look for long, thin sweet potatoes; they make better oven fries than shorter, more squat ones.

Her new eating plan Instead of detoxing to get more produce, Kelly needed to consume more whole fruit and vegetables as part of a balanced diet, Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D.N., in Chicago, tells SELF. "Dawn taught me ways to work them in, like adding lots of zucchini to pasta sauce," Kelly says. Kelly planned for treats, such as a small cup of ice cream, that she could enjoy without overdoing it. And she cut back on takeout by cooking big meals and saving half for later.


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In the history of the United States, a clean living movement is a period of time when a surge of health-reform crusades, many with moral overtones, erupts into the popular consciousness. This results in individual, or group reformers such as the anti-tobacco or alcohol coalitions of the late twentieth century, to campaign to eliminate the health problem or to "clean up" society. The term "Clean Living Movement" was coined by Ruth C. Engs, a Professor of Applied Health Sciences at Indiana University in 1990.
Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes (such as beans and lentils), and nuts—and limit highly processed foods. If you eat animal foods, you can add in some dairy products, fish, poultry, and lean meat. Studies show that people who eat this way have a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes, and possibly cancer and other chronic diseases. Here are our guidelines for building a healthy diet.
Sugary drinks, such as soda and juice, are big sources of empty energy. This means that they contain a lot of energy (in the form of calories) but they don’t contain a lot of nutrients (vitamins, minerals, or fiber). Try sugar-free drink mixes, water (plain or you can add fruit to your water), and seltzer water instead of soda or juice. Even if labeled “natural” or “100% fruit juice,” juices are missing an important nutrient found in whole fruit: fiber. Without fiber, the sugar from the fruit will give you quick energy, but it won’t last long and you may find yourself feeling tired soon after drinking. If you are going to drink regular juice, try to limit the amount you drink to 4-8 ounces, one time per day and consider adding water to “dilute” it
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You are what you eat! What you eat can affect every aspect of your health, so make sure you’re eating the good stuff. You can learn more about clean eating from our blog series here, but, in a nutshell, clean eating means eating a diet of whole, organic and unprocessed foods – you know, real food. Avoid things with additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.
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