Detoxification and body cleansing products and diets have been criticized for their unsound scientific basis, in particular their premise of nonexistent "toxins" and their appropriation of the legitimate medical concept of detoxification. According to the Mayo Clinic, the "toxins" typically remain unspecified and there is little to no evidence of toxic accumulation in patients treated.[18] According to a British Dietetic Association (BDA) Fact Sheet, "The whole idea of detox is nonsense. The body is a well-developed system that has its own builtin mechanisms to detoxify and remove waste and toxins."[3] It went on to characterize the idea as a "marketing myth",[3] while other critics have called the idea a "scam"[19] and a "hoax".[20] The organization Sense about Science investigated "detox" products, calling them a waste of time and money".[2][21][22] resulting in a report that concluded the term is used differently by different companies, most offered no evidence to support their claims, and in most cases its use was the simple renaming of "mundane things, like cleaning or brushing".[2]
The term "detox diet" is broad, divisive, and often conjures thoughts of cleanses featuring cayenne-laced lemon water that promise to curb cravings, boost energy, and help you lose weight. Many people are quick to say they’re all a hoax, too, since the body is more than capable of taking care of itself, thanks to our built-in detoxification system starring the liver.
Your tip Johnson was scared of carbs, she says, and working with a dietitian helped her get past her fears. If you've been detoxing to avoid carbohydrates, start slowly by adding two to three servings a day of the healthiest kinds—whole-grain breads and starchy vegetables, including peas, sweet potatoes, squash, and corn. Work your way up to the recommended three to five daily servings.

Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts contain sulfur-containing phytochemicals called glucosinolates, which are protective against cancer, anti-inflammatory, and may help the body remove toxins. One study found that a drink made with broccoli activated enzymes that helped pick up pollutants from the bloodstream and flush them out via urine. Cruciferous veggies are also high in fiber, which helps feed "good" probiotic gut bacteria and promote digestion. That’s critical, since a damaged (or leaky) gut allows various toxins and bacteria into the bloodstream, contributing to issues like systemic inflammation and autoimmune disease.

For much of history, clean living was a lifestyle focused on living a good and moral life. Clean meant abstaining from vices like alcohol, gambling, sexual acts that might be deemed perverse or unlawful, cursing, dishonesty, and, in general, things that just weren’t wholesome or appropriate. You can see a devotion to clean living in the spur of movements like Prohibition.
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