Detoxification (often shortened to detox and sometimes called body cleansing) is a type of alternative medicine treatment which aims to rid the body of unspecified "toxins" – substances that proponents claim have accumulated in the body and have undesirable short-term or long-term effects on individual health. Activities commonly associated with detoxification include dieting, fasting, consuming exclusively or avoiding specific foods (such as fats, carbohydrates, fruits, vegetables, juices, herbs, or water), colon cleansing, chelation therapy, and the removal of dental fillings containing amalgam.
Not into green tea? Try sipping on dandelion root tea, sometimes called dandelion coffee, which is caffeine-free and tastes somewhat similar to actual coffee. Dandelion is famous for its cleansing properties, and one study found that it helped rid the body of reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress, which reduced risk of atherosclerosis (deposits of plaque within arteries). Dandelion greens are great too, as they can help stimulate bile production and promote healthy digestion.

Vayali generally recommends that her patients cut out processed foods from their diets. These include things like store-bought pastries, microwave dinners, candies – many of the pre-prepared products you find in the middle aisles of your grocery store. Instead of relying on these convenience items, fill up on whole foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats and fish.
Check your diary and mark a week where you have a clean break from functions or events that might derail your detox, such as weddings, birthdays or special occasion meals. Some people may experience a 'cleansing' reaction in the first few days of detox, including headaches or loose bowel movements. This is due to the sudden withdrawal of certain foods, in addition to stimulation of detoxifying organs. These symptoms should subside in 24 to 48 hours.
Create an eating style that can improve your health now and in the future by making small changes over time. Consider changes that reflect your personal preferences, culture and traditions. Think of each change as a “win” as you build positive habits and find solutions that reflect your healthy eating style. Each change is a MyWin that can help you build your healthy eating style. Use the tips and links below to find little victories that work for you.

Fresh, Frozen, or Canned Vegetables ― try something new. You may find that you love grilled vegetables or steamed vegetables with an herb you haven’t tried like rosemary. You can sauté (panfry) vegetables in a non-stick pan with a small amount of cooking spray. Or try frozen or canned vegetables for a quick side dish—just microwave and serve. When trying canned vegetables, look for vegetables without added salt, butter, or cream sauces. Commit to going to the produce department and trying a new vegetable each week.


For much of history, clean living was a lifestyle focused on living a good and moral life. Clean meant abstaining from vices like alcohol, gambling, sexual acts that might be deemed perverse or unlawful, cursing, dishonesty, and, in general, things that just weren’t wholesome or appropriate. You can see a devotion to clean living in the spur of movements like Prohibition.
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