Common food intolerances include those to soy, gluten, corn, eggs, peanuts, shellfish, and dairy. If you have some of the symptoms above, consider eliminating potential trigger foods for a period of time (it usually takes a few weeks to notice a difference), preferably under the supervision of a doctor or registered dietitian. You’ll also want to eliminate alcohol since your body registers alcohol as a toxin and relies on your liver to process and eliminate it, which can put stress on the organ.
In the history of the United States, a clean living movement is a period of time when a surge of health-reform crusades, many with moral overtones, erupts into the popular consciousness. This results in individual, or group reformers such as the anti-tobacco or alcohol coalitions of the late twentieth century, to campaign to eliminate the health problem or to "clean up" society. The term "Clean Living Movement" was coined by Ruth C. Engs, a Professor of Applied Health Sciences at Indiana University in 1990.
It wasn’t all peaches and rainbows. At the beginning I wasn’t getting enough to eat. At times I lost hope of feeling better. There have been days this year when I craved a steak and gluten free bread. There have been days when I craved chocolate ice cream. But, there have been many more days when I craved spinach, green juice, banana smoothies, coconut milk, and cucumber noodles with cauliflower alfredo. On the regular I feel better; I sleep better; it’s easier for me to prioritize my time and evaluate what’s really important. In that way, I’ve already eaten my way clean. 🙂
Once you slice and sauté your way to a fabulous feast, you don't have to finish every bite. "We're conditioned to think that if we don't devour everything on our plate, we are misbehaving," McKenna says. But if you keep munching even after you're full, you are using your body as a storage unit. If there's enough left over for lunch tomorrow, pack it up and put it in the fridge. Otherwise, toss scraps in the trash. We promise we won't tell your mom.
Fast-forward two years, however, and the culinary landscape is unrecognisable; not only has Evans’s recent cooking tome Healthy Every Day (Pan Macmillan) emerged as one of 2014’s bestsellers, but similar books spruiking the clean-living message from the likes of Sarah Wilson (I Quit Sugar) and Luke Hines and Scott Gooding (Clean Living) are flying off the shelves at a rate of more than a million copies a year.
When you sit down to a meal, try to savor every bite. Especially the first few, because those are the bites you're going to enjoy most. "There is a toning down of taste buds after the first few bites," says Linda Bacon, Ph.D., professor of nutrition at City College of San Francisco. That's not the only reason to take it slow while eating. It takes your brain about 20 minutes to realize your stomach is full. If you're throwing back food like there's no tomorrow, odds are you're going to accidentally eat past the full and wind up totally stuffed.
These ruby-hued roots contain a type of antioxidant called betalains, which may help reduce chronic inflammation and repair cells in the liver thanks to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Beets also boast high amounts of dietary nitrates, which expand blood vessels and improve blood flow, and thus lower blood pressure. Consider blending your beets with a peeled orange, splash of seltzer, and some ice for a refreshing treat.
Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts contain sulfur-containing phytochemicals called glucosinolates, which are protective against cancer, anti-inflammatory, and may help the body remove toxins. One study found that a drink made with broccoli activated enzymes that helped pick up pollutants from the bloodstream and flush them out via urine. Cruciferous veggies are also high in fiber, which helps feed "good" probiotic gut bacteria and promote digestion. That’s critical, since a damaged (or leaky) gut allows various toxins and bacteria into the bloodstream, contributing to issues like systemic inflammation and autoimmune disease.

And while businesses and organizations assure us all of these new things are safe, how can we really be sure? It’s already known that long-term or concentrated exposure to a number of man-made chemicals and substances is unsafe; and while still unproven, there are suspected health hazards linked to many more. Some substances haven’t been around long enough for us to know the possible long-term effects on our health.

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