This book is all about clean eating diet. Many of us love food and there are times we don’t actually notice how much we are eating and how unhealthy it is for us which is one of the reason for obesity to increase around the world. A lot of problems develop in a human’s body when we eat way too much and it simply does no good. If you ask me, eating a clean healthy diet is the best option. This book will tell you about the different foods you can eat in order to maintain your weight and live a healthier and a happy life!

To help remind me of my focus, I made this wellness pyramid. It’s  visual depiction of what I will prioritize in my quest for balanced wellness. I think of it like a food pyramid or like Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs, but refocused on finding overall wellbeing. In both systems, the base is the foundation and the top priority.  It’s easier to achieve the higher levels of the pyramid if you satisfy the base layers. It’s a great visual reminder of what to prioritize if your short on time or resources. Here’s mine:
Opt for recipes with variety. Try to get a variety of vegetables on your plate, such as dark leafy greens, beets, artichokes, onions, carrots, and cucumbers. Add cooked chickpeas, avocado, brown rice, baked sweet potato, hemp seeds, extra-virgin olive oil, and other foods rich in protein, fiber, and fat. Better yet, look for recipes that combine a variety of plant-based ingredients like Sweet Potato and Red Cabbage Slaw.
Create an eating style that can improve your health now and in the future by making small changes over time. Consider changes that reflect your personal preferences, culture and traditions. Think of each change as a “win” as you build positive habits and find solutions that reflect your healthy eating style. Each change is a MyWin that can help you build your healthy eating style. Use the tips and links below to find little victories that work for you.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Juice diets do prevent your body from going into a state called ketosis, he says. Ketosis means your body has no carbohydrates to burn for energy, so it has to burn stored fat or whatever else is available, he tells WebMD. "You feel bad, even smell bad. That's what makes you feel like hell during a [water-only] fast. But is that because the toxins are coming out? No! You're going into ketosis. It's known physiology."
“When I need to give my diet a reboot, I focus on having two nourishing, planned snacks per day, like a pear and pecans, or grape tomatoes and string cheese, or berries and yogurt. And I put the snacks on a plate, sit down and enjoy them.” This part is especially key. When you graze or snack mindlessly, you don’t register those foods as well as when you plate them. No plate? No problem! Use a paper towel, napkin, cup or whatever is available to you to help you eat more mindfully.
During this era a focus on exercise, non-use of tobacco, and the elimination of coffee, tea, sugar, meat and spice from a diet, called "Grahamism," – named after reformer Sylvester Graham – was promoted. Eugenic or "hereditarian" concerns that masturbation would lead to insanity and that choosing sick or feeble spouses would lead to further degeneration was discussed. Out of this era Phrenology – the study of shapes and bumps on the head – used to select a healthy marriage partner was popular. New religions that promoted "pure" lifestyles such as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Seventh-day Adventists emerged.
A clean-eating diet, such as the Eat Clean Diet from fitness and health author Tosca Reno focuses on eating only clean, unprocessed whole foods. It’s similar to the elimination diet but takes it one step further by saying goodbye to all vices: sugar, caffeine, processed foods and more. “Once a year for a week or so I eat very clean and lighten things up,” says Wasserman. “I make sure I eat lighter grains such as quinoa, mostly veggies and watch my sugar intake.”
These foods—notably vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains—should supply about 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber a day, depending on your calorie needs. (Aim for 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories, as advised by the  Dietary Guidelines for Americans.) Fiber slows the absorption of carbohydrates, so they have less effect on insulin and blood sugar, and it provides other health benefits. Try to fill three-quarters of your plate with produce, legumes, and whole grains—leaving only one-quarter for meat, poultry, or other protein sources.
"The front is all advertising," says Michelle K. Berman, R.D., of Fairfax, Virginia. Flip it around for the real story. The more ingredients, the more likely it has visited a few processing plants where something artificial was mixed in, says Lydia Zepeda, Ph.D., professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Plus, checking the label is a great way to find out if there are unnecessary ingredients in something seemingly healthy. Because, no, bread does not need added sugar.
The 3-Day Detox Diet. Don't have 2-weeks for a full detox? This 3-day detox is my own plan. It's easy, it's simple and there are no fancy foods required. In fact, it follows guidelines developed by the USDA's MyPlate nutritional program. This is the plan that I use when I need to reset my taste buds after a busy party season or a vacation full of indulgent foods.
Creators of detox diets base their ideas on an incorrect theory that our bodies are being constantly bombarded by toxins such as cigarette smoke, pollution and pesticides, which it cannot handle. They say that these toxins “build up over time” and because of this cause weight gain, headaches, dull skin and bloating. However, everybody has a liver and kidneys, these organs work by filtering the blood and removing bad toxins from our body naturally - therefore these detoxing ideas are not true.
These include soda, candy, white bread, regular pasta, and many snack foods and baked goods. A high intake of added sugar increases inflammation and insulin resistance, increasing the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders—and it supplies “empty” calories that contribute to weight gain. Refined grain products have little dietary fiber and have been stripped of many nutrients; a high intake can cause many of the same health problems as added sugar.
This journey is all about the end-game: a long-term solution to feeling better and eating what makes me feel good –in moderation– forever. This isn’t about extreme restrictions one month of the year followed by slowly getting sick, tired and unhealthy throughout the next 11 months. I’m not saying the elimination diet and cleanse from last year was a bad idea or unproductive. It was an amazing experiment that changed the way I see my life and my health. I learned what my body likes and what it doesn’t; what gives me energy and what taketh away. I HAD to do that to learn what makes sense for my wellness journey. What I need now is not to repeat that journey. Instead I need time to practice maintained moderation and balance. Basically, I need to turn those lessons learned into every day habits.

“Surfaces in the home and kitchen are in contact with food preparation and ultimately your mouth,” Coviello says. Her recipe for an inexpensive homemade cleaner is simple: distilled vinegar diluted in water and scented with essential oil. She recommends Brooklyn-based Common Good all-purpose cleaners, the brand sells refillable bottles that minimize plastic waste. Chic glass containers and sleek branding are a plus.
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