When you sit down to a meal, try to savor every bite. Especially the first few, because those are the bites you're going to enjoy most. "There is a toning down of taste buds after the first few bites," says Linda Bacon, Ph.D., professor of nutrition at City College of San Francisco. That's not the only reason to take it slow while eating. It takes your brain about 20 minutes to realize your stomach is full. If you're throwing back food like there's no tomorrow, odds are you're going to accidentally eat past the full and wind up totally stuffed.
Mild and healthy, spinach is the perfect base to many meals and allows bold flavors to seep in and soak the leaves. Precooked lentils make this healthy lunch come together in 10 minutes (or less!). You can also roast the beets ahead of time—look for the golden variety in grocery stores. They're much less messy than red beets, which can stain your hands and your cutting board.
Eat like a tourist in Greece. The sunset over your office park isn't as stunning as the one over an Aegean beach, but a plate of grilled fish and fresh vegetables and a glass of wine is as delicious in Athens, Georgia, as it is in Athens, Greece. All the heart-healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants in Mediterranean foods like hummus, olive oil, and feta can help lower your risk for heart disease, says Susan Mitchell, Ph.D., coauthor of Fat Is Not Your Fate (Fireside).
According to data published by the NPD Group: Three out of five Americans say they want more protein in their diets; Fourteen percent of U.S. consumers, or more than 43 million people, regularly use plant-based products and 86 percent of them aren’t vegans or vegetarian. These figures are in sync with the growing influence of our Clean Living investing […]
And that’s exactly why I created the 10-Day Detox Diet — I wanted to teach you how easy, fast, and delicious it can be to lose weight and create health. Just follow this proven program, and in 10 days not only can you lose up to 10 pounds, but you may also turn the tide on chronic health problems including type 2 diabetes, asthma, joint pain, digestive problems, autoimmune disease, headaches, brain fog, allergies, acne, eczema, and even sexual dysfunction.

So, if you want, join me this January in honoring a healthy balance and striving for what you’ve found makes you feel goood!! For me that’s continuing a gluten free, dairy free and refined sugar free diet; getting cardio, weights and yoga into my routine; taking time to relax; reflecting on my days; and practicing no screens for at least 30 minutes before bed and 10 minutes after I wake up (baby steps here ok! I work in software for goodness sake)!


In this easy one-pan dinner, boneless pork loin roast is cooked over a bed of carrots and parsnips for an all-in-one dish that makes an impressive centerpiece for a holiday meal or Sunday dinner. Choose free-range heritage pork if you can--its flavor really shines with no more seasoning than a bit of thyme and a little sea salt. If you'd like, dress up the meal with a traditional Irish apple condiment--Ploughmans chutney or Bramley applesauce, which you can find in specialty stores and online.
At this point, you have a great base diet full of nourishing whole foods. But now it’s time to get more strategic and add in specific foods that have been shown to improve digestion, heal the gut (since a leaky gut can allow unwanted toxins into the bloodstream), and support the liver or assist your body’s detoxification processes in other ways. These 12 are a great place to start:
Opt for recipes with variety. Try to get a variety of vegetables on your plate, such as dark leafy greens, beets, artichokes, onions, carrots, and cucumbers. Add cooked chickpeas, avocado, brown rice, baked sweet potato, hemp seeds, extra-virgin olive oil, and other foods rich in protein, fiber, and fat. Better yet, look for recipes that combine a variety of plant-based ingredients like Sweet Potato and Red Cabbage Slaw.
"Staying well-hydrated helps your body function properly, and it also helps make sure you don’t overeat," Pam Bede, M.S., R.D. with Abbott’s EAS Sports Nutrition, tells SELF. But it's not just that staying hydrated keeps you from overeating. According to Maxine Yeung, M.S., R.D., owner of The Wellness Whisk, sometimes you may feel hungry when, in fact, you're actually thirsty. Basically, no harm can come from drinking a glass of water.
Diets that provide plenty of fiber (about 25 to 29 grams per day) may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke by as much as 30%. Consuming whole grains such as whole wheat and oatmeal seems to offer the most heart-protecting benefits. One reason for this benefit may be that people may substitute whole-grain foods for less-healthy refined grains, such as white rice and white bread, which raise blood sugar and have other harmful metabolic effects. More »
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Here's who won't tell you to detox: doctors and registered dietitians, most of whom agree the habit can become dangerous and lead to disordered eating—and that detoxes don't even deliver on the promise of bringing about long-term weight loss, either. Detoxing may make you shed water weight, but it quickly returns. Worse: A lack of nutrients can make your body eat into muscle for energy. Since lean muscle keeps your metabolism chugging smoothly along, this can wreck any strength and weight-loss goals you may have. It also becomes harder to burn calories because your body conserves what little energy it gets, Peter Pressman, M.D., an internist with the U.S. Navy Medical Corps and a fellow of the American College of Clinical Nutrition, tells SELF. "Clinical evidence shows that the notion of a nutritional scrub is nothing more than highly profitable fiction," he says.
Trans fat: Some trans fat is naturally in fatty meat and dairy products. Artificial trans fats  have been widely used in packaged baked goods and microwave popcorn. They're bad for heart health, so avoid them as much as possible. Look on the nutrition facts label to see how much trans fat is in an item. Know that something that says "0 g trans fat" may actually have up to half a gram of trans fat in it. So also check the ingredients list: If it mentions "partially hydrogenated" oils, those are trans fats.

Why she cleansed Everywhere she turned, Edwards felt enticed: She loved soda and butter, and a part-time job at the Cheesecake Factory meant she was often eating in a place where "one meal is enough calories for an entire day," she tells SELF. When she received a coupon for a BluePrint Cleanse—18 bottles of juice designed to be consumed in a specific order over the course of three days—it seemed like a chance to clean up her diet. "I'm fairly thin, but I'm not gonna say no to weight loss," she explains. "I doubt I would have tried it unless it was free, because it costs $195 for a three-day cleanse." Edwards lost six pounds in three days; not only was that more than doctors deem safe, but all the weight came back within a month.

Try a lower-calorie version. Use lower-calorie ingredients or prepare food differently. For example, if your macaroni and cheese recipe uses whole milk, butter, and full-fat cheese, try remaking it with non-fat milk, less butter, light cream cheese, fresh spinach and tomatoes. Just remember to not increase your portion size. For more ideas on how to cut back on calories, see Eat More Weigh Less.
If you’re experiencing digestive woes, consider parsley. This often-overlooked herb acts as a natural diuretic and helps prevent bloating. It also contains anti-inflammatory vitamin C. Cilantro is another great pick, as it can help remove heavy metals like mercury and lead from the body. Try adding both of these herbs to your morning smoothie. Want more of a kick? Go for ginger, an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant spice that promotes balanced blood sugar and optimal digestion. Or start using more garlic, which contains naturally detoxifying sulfur compounds (just like cruciferous veggies) and combats the growth of unfriendly bacteria in the gut.

These include soda, candy, white bread, regular pasta, and many snack foods and baked goods. A high intake of added sugar increases inflammation and insulin resistance, increasing the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders—and it supplies “empty” calories that contribute to weight gain. Refined grain products have little dietary fiber and have been stripped of many nutrients; a high intake can cause many of the same health problems as added sugar.
While things like cigarettes and alcohol could technically fit under our toxins category, most of us would probably agree that they’re not exactly in the same category as, say, household cleaners. These substances are meant to be consumed and alter your current state. Alcohol is a depressant and drugs exist as both depressants and stimulants. Caffeine is also a stimulant and can affect your mood, focus and more. Like many toxins, these substances tax your body’s natural detoxification systems and should be limited or avoided. (Skip the cigarettes, but there’s nothing wrong with a glass of wine now and again or a cup of coffee.)
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